Current Projects

DOT generally presents projects at community board meetings where the public can ask questions and provide feedback. To find out more about these meetings check the DOT Events Calendar or contact your local community board. See older projects from recent years: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013 Contact DOT if you have a question, comment or concern about a project

Complete Streets

West End Avenue Traffic Calming and Pedestrian Safety Improvements

DOT is proposing safety improvements for W 72nd St to W 106th St on West End Avenue. The proposal will remove excess road capacity, add left turn bays in a painted center median, and add a wide parking stripe to calm traffic and reduce unnecessary lane changes. The left turns off of West End Avenue at W 95th and W 97th Streets would be banned and replaced with pedestrian safety islands that provide safer crossings for pedestrians and require traffic turning on to West End Ave from side streets to make slower safer turns around the islands. Four islands are included in the proposal: two at each intersection, in the north and south crosswalks across West End Avenue. These changes will better organize traffic and improve safety for everyone using the street. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Manhattan Community Board 7 Transportation Committee in August 2014) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Manhattan Community Board 7 Town Hall in July 2014)

Safety Enhancements for Myrtle and Wyckoff Avenues at Palmetto Street

At the request of former Council Member Reyna and the local community, DOT developed a plan to enhance safety for all street users at the complex intersection of Myrtle and Wyckoff Avenues at Palmetto Street. The proposal shortens crossing distances for pedestrians with painted sidewalk extensions along this six-legged intersection. The installation of a new crosswalk and upgraded high visibility crosswalks further enhance safety. The design also creates a safer environment for all street users by eliminating low-volume turns. This helps create more predictable movements by vehicles, thereby improving safety for everyone using the roadway. All together, these adjustments will streamline traffic flow through this intersection, which is heavily used by pedestrians and serves as a key transit hub at the Brooklyn-Queens border. Download a slideshow on an updated version of the proposal (pdf) (presented to Queens Community Board 5 in May 2014) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (April 2014) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 4 in June 2014)

Flatbush Avenue Extension at Myrtle Avenue Intersection Safety Improvements

In response to requests from the community, DOT is proposing pedestrian safety improvements for the intersection of Flatbush Avenue Extension and Myrtle Avenue. These changes will reduce conflicts between pedestrians and vehicles while improving the conditions for turning vehicles, including the buses on the B54 route. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in February 2014) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in June 2014)

White Plains Road Traffic Calming

DOT is proposing a set of changes to White Plains Road between Birchall Avenue and Soundview Avenue. DOT will install left turn bays and add parking stripes to narrow moving lanes. These changes will organize traffic and discourage speeding, improving safety for everyone using the street. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 11 in June 2014) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 9 in June 2014)

South End Avenue Pedestrian Safety Improvements

After working with the community, DOT developed safety improvements for South End Avenue and West Thames Street in Battery Park City. Safety improvements include new pedestrian islands and crosswalks that will calm traffic and provide pedestrians with designated crossing locations along the corridor. Download a slideshow on the original proposal (pdf) Download a slideshow on an updated version of the proposal (pdf) (presented to Manhattan Community Board 1 Battery Park City Committee in June 2014)

Richmond Avenue Corridor Safety Improvements

DOT is proposing a set of safety improvements to Richmond Avenue between Forest Avenue and Victory Boulevard. DOT will install a modified painted center median and a parking lane stripe to standardize and better define moving lanes in order to calm traffic and reduce speeding along this designated High Crash Corridor. In addition, a planted, concrete center median will be installed in key locations along the corridor. The new concrete median will also include pedestrian safety islands at three locations, including at Richmond Avenue and Morani Street, which is a designated High Pedestrian Crash Location. DOT's proposed changes will calm traffic and discourage speeding, better organize traffic, and provide for safer pedestrian crossings, improving safety for all road users. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Staten Island Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in June 2014)

Franklin Avenue Transportation Improvements

Based on community input from an April 2, 2014 workshop, DOT is proposing safety and mobility enhancements to Franklin Avenue including improved signal operation and traffic flow, widened parking and travel lanes, a dedicated bicycle lane, parking regulation changes, and concrete pedestrian islands on Atlantic Avenue. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 8 in May 2014)

Hillside and Metropolitan Pedestrian Safety Improvements

DOT is proposing pedestrian safety improvements to the complicated intersections of Hillside Avenue with Metropolitan Avenue and with Kew Gardens Road. The pedestrian safety improvements include concrete sidewalk extensions, shorter and safer pedestrian crossings, an improved traffic network with more efficient signal timing, turn restrictions to improve traffic flow, and the elimination of dangerous pedestrian and vehicle conflicts at the intersection of Hillside and Metropolitan Avenues. This proposal will enhance pedestrian safety and mobility while improving traffic flow through the complex intersections along Hillside Avenue. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014)

Foster Avenue Traffic Calming & Pedestrian Safety Improvements

DOT is proposing a set of changes to Foster Avenue between Kings Highway and Remsen Avenue. DOT will install left turn bays and add a parking stripe to narrow moving lanes. In addition, new pedestrian space will be added and one lane in each direction will be removed between East 81st Street & East 88th Street. These changes will organize traffic and discourage speeding, improving safety for everyone using the street. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 18 in May 2014)

St. Nicholas Place & West 155th Street Street Intersection Safety Improvements

In response to several requests from the community for safety improvements at the complicated intersection of 155th Street with St. Nicholas Place, Edgecombe Avenue and Harlem River Driveway, DOT is proposing sidewalk extensions for shorter, safer pedestrian crossings and turn restrictions for improved traffic flow and reduced conflict points. Improvements are also proposed on St. Nicholas Place between 151st Street and 155th Street, including a new pedestrian crossing at 152nd Street and several pedestrian safety islands. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014)

Park Avenue Traffic Calming

Incorporating recommendations from a community-led safety study, DOT is proposing traffic calming treatments for Park Avenue between Navy Street and Flushing Avenue in Brooklyn. The proposal will remove excess road capacity and add a wide parking stripe to eastbound Park Avenue and add a wide parking stripe to narrow westbound Park Avenue. Signal timing will be optimized on Park Avenue to provide more crossing time for pedestrians, reduce speeding and provide smoother traffic flow. The parking areas under the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, which divide the eastbound and westbound sections of Park Avenue, will have their entrances improved. All these treatments will better organize traffic, discourage speeding and remove dangerous pedestrian and vehicle conflicts, improving safety for everyone using the street. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014)

Redesign of Northern Boulevard, 62nd Street to 102nd Street

In response to a request from Council Member Daniel Dromm to conduct a traffic safety study along Northern Boulevard, DOT is proposing traffic safety improvements on the arterial. This portion of Northern Boulevard is a high crash corridor, ranking in the top 10% of all Queens corridors for traffic injuries. The proposal will add 9 pedestrian islands, which will provide safer pedestrian crossings, create simpler, safer left turns from cross streets, and reduce motor vehicle and pedestrian conflict. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Queens Community Board 3 in May 2014)

Astoria Boulevard Safety Improvements

In response to community requests and NYPD concerns, DOT is proposing to split the I-278 exit ramp from Astoria Boulevard North between 33rd Street and 31st Street in Astoria. This proposal will reduce collisions caused by weaving and cross over traffic. Turn restrictions will be implemented at 31st Street to further improve safety. West of 31st Street, traffic will be able to merge as needed, maintaining access to the local street network and the RFK Bridge. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Queens Community Board 1 Transportation Committee in May 2014)

Third Avenue Bus Lane Improvements

The current curbside bus lane on Third Avenue in Manhattan is persistently obstructed by trucks and other vehicles, forcing the bus to operate in the adjacent lane with mixed-flow traffic. This results in poor travel times and reliability for the 59,000 daily riders who use the M98, M101, M102, and M103 buses, in addition to the dozen express routes utilizing the corridor. The Third Avenue Bus Lane Improvement project will move the bus lane to an “offset” position, one lane away from the curb, while restoring daytime commercial vehicle loading along the eastern curb. The new design will accommodate the demand for commercial loading, allowing the bus lane to stay clear to expedite bus speeds. Additionally, DOT is studying a potential new bus stop at 57th Street via a boarding island. The goal is to accommodate a much needed stop at a major destination while working to improve pedestrian safety at Third Avenue and 57th Street, a high crash intersection. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014)

Broadway from Northern Boulevard to 65th Street Corridor Safety Improvements

Following a recent fatality at the intersection of Broadway with 34th Avenue and 58th Street, and in response to community requests to reduce speeding, DOT proposes corridor traffic safety improvements along Broadway in Woodside, Queens between 65th Street and Northern Boulevard. In addition to addressing speeding, the proposed changes will better organize traffic, create safer crossings for pedestrians, and create a safer merge at 34th Avenue-58th Street. These improvements will help to reduce crashes for everyone on the road. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Queens Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in April 2014)

Edward L. Grant Safety Improvements

Edward L. Grant Highway near the Washington Bridge on- and off-ramps is a critical node in the bus network. Five bus routes use the highway to travel between the Bronx and Manhattan. The high volume of buses, mixed with heavy pedestrian and general traffic, must navigate a wide roadway that includes long pedestrian crossings and a three-lane merge for the buses. In 2014, DOT will reshape the roadway to increase pedestrian safety, reduce conflicts between buses and other vehicles, and improve bus stops. The project includes a bus boarding island, a one-block bus lane, a pedestrian refuge island, and two sidewalk extensions. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (April 2014)

Albany Crescent and Bailey Avenue Intersection Improvements

Albany Crescent and Bailey Avenue is a designated high pedestrian crash location. DOT is proposing to install a pedestrian safety island in the east crosswalk to shorten crossing distances and to relocate the south crosswalk to minimize pedestrian/vehicle conflict, reduce crossing distance, and provide conflict-free space for Fire Department vehicles. DOT also proposes reversing Albany Crescent between Bailey Avenue and West 231st Street to reduce conflicts in the intersection, and install parking lane stripes to reduce speeding and calm traffic. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Community Board 8 in March 2014)

Hunter Street-Crescent Area Pedestrian Network Improvements

This Long Island City area proposal emerged from several community requests for pedestrian network improvements. The proposed improvements include widening sidewalks, constructing pedestrian islands and clarifying the traffic network to enhance safety and mobility for all users. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to the Queens Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in March 2014)

Pedestrian Improvements at Riverside Drive and West 72nd and 79th Streets

DOT is proposing shorter, safer pedestrian crossings, tightened intersections, and simplified vehicle movements at the intersections of Riverside Drive and West 72nd and 79th Street. Signals will be added to the Henry Hudson Parkway exit ramp at 79th Street and bike markings will be added between East 77th Street and the Henry Hudson Greenway for improved bicycle connections in the bicycle network. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to the Community Board 7 Transportation Committee in March 2014) Download an updated slideshow with more detail on the intersection of Riverside Drive and West 72nd Street (pdf) (presented to the Community Board 7 Transportation Committee in May 2014)

Park Avenue and 125th Safety Improvements

As an early action item of an on-going plan for Park Avenue and 125th Street by the NYC Economic Development Corporation, DOT is proposing three painted neckdowns on Park Ave at 125th St. These neckdowns will contain landscaped planters maintained in partnership with New Harlem East Merchants Association, and provide shorter crossings, pedestrian visibility, and traffic calming for the heavy pedestrian volumes. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Community Board 11 in February 2014)

Willis Avenue Connections

To improve bicycle and pedestrian access to the Willis Avenue Bridge, DOT will improve markings and signage on the bridge and its approaches. In addition, the agency will implement pedestrian enhancements, such as curb extensions and new pedestrian crossings of RFK Bridge on-ramps at East 124th and 125th Streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (March 2014)

Park Avenue Corridor Safety Improvements (96th–111th Streets)

In response to requests from the community, DOT is proposing safety improvements along Park Avenue between 96th and 111th Streets. The proposal includes new concrete neckdowns along the Park Avenue viaduct at each pedestrian tunnel opening, signal modifications, new markings, and new lighting within the tunnels. The plan will help shorten pedestrian crossings, improve pedestrian visibility, and calm traffic, and improve pedestrian lighting. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Bowery and Delancey Street Intersection Improvements

The intersection of Bowery and Delancey Street suffers from heavy vehicle volumes travelling to and from the Williamsburg Bridge. This volume mixed with a large amount of pedestrian traffic and an inefficient use of roadway space causes congestion and creates an unwelcoming crossing condition for pedestrians. In 2014, DOT will be reshape this intersection to improve traffic flow, increase pedestrians safety, and enhance the street scape by adding a new southbound through travel lane, reshaping and shifting the existing pedestrian safety islands, planting two trees, adding a pedestrian-only signal phase and modifying parking regulations. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (February 2014)

Burke Avenue Traffic Calming

DOT is proposing a set of changes to Burke Avenue between Bronx Park East and East Gun Hill Road. DOT will install left turn bays and add a parking stripe to narrow moving lanes. These changes will organize traffic, reduce congestion and discourage speeding, improving safety for everyone using the street. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (February 2014)

Broadway at West 96th Street Pedestrian Safety Improvements

DOT proposed safety improvements at the intersection of Broadway and West 96th St at a special meeting of Community Board 7. The proposal will reduce conflicts between pedestrians and motor vehicles at the busy intersection while increasing pedestrian crossing options and reducing wait time. Download a presentation about the project (pdf) (January 2014)

Third Avenue at East 60th Street Pedestrian Safety Improvement Project

In response to a recent pedestrian fatality and community concern, DOT is proposing safety improvements for the intersection of Third Avenue and East 60th Street. The project includes a shorter pedestrian crossing distance with painted neckdowns, a left-turn-only lane on Third Avenue and the extension of the right-turn-only lane on East 60th Street. These proposals will ease congestion and reduce weaving through the intersection. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (January 2014)

Broadway and Dyckman Street-Riverside Drive Safety and Mobility Improvements

DOT is proposing several left turn restrictions at this complex intersection to improve pedestrian safety. As a result of the turn restrictions, there will be two conflict-free crossings for pedestrians and overall, traffic will flow better. Download a presentation about the project (pdf)

East Tremont Pedestrian Safety Improvements

This high crash corridor is unsafe and challenging for pedestrians to cross due to its width and high percentage of speeding vehicles. In response to community requests these new improvements include clearly defining and narrowing moving lanes, constructing neckdowns and safety islands, adding crosswalks, reconfiguring the signals for through and left turning traffic and adding landscaping. Download a presentation about the project (pdf)

Hillside Avenue and Homelawn Street Pedestrian Improvements

DOT is proposing pedestrian safety imrpovements for the busy intersection of Hillside Avenue and Homelawn Street in Queens, which ranks in the top 1% of intersections in the borough for crashes. The plan provides safer, shorter crossings as well as new sidewalk space and landscaped safety islands to enhance the pedestrian network and clarify traffic movements. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (September 2013)

Hyatt Street Pedestrian Improvements

Hyatt Street connects downtown St. George with the ferry and bus terminal. It is a vibrant pedestrian street, but is also in the top ten corridors for crashes in Staten island. This proposal from DOT will add crosswalks and landscaped pedestrian space to the two blocks betwen St. Marks Place and Bay Street while rationalizing the street for all users. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (October 2013)

Ralph Avenue & Ditmas Avenue Intersection Safety Improvements

In response to community requests for vehicular and pedestrian safety improvements at the intersection of Ralph Avenue, Ditmas Avenue, East 83rd Street, Canarsie Lane and Clarendon Road, the DOT developed a plan to better organize and simplify the intersection, eliminate two dangerous left turns, provide two new crosswalks, one left turn signal and continuous sidewalk on the east curb of Ralph Avenue. Download a presentation about the project (pdf)

Morningside Avenue Safety Improvements

At the request of community groups and the Police Department, DOT has developed a proposal to improve traffic safety on Morningside Avenue from 116th Street to 126th Street. The plan will create pedestrian islands and left turn lanes, shorten pedestrian crosswalks, reduce speeding and crashes and improve connections to Morningside Park. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Lefferts Boulevard Safety Improvements

In an effort to improve safety along Lefferts Boulevard, DOT proposes removing one travel lane in each direction from 149th Avenue to Rockaway Boulevard to reduce speeding, installing left turn bays to organize traffic and keep through traffic moving, installing a parking stripe to narrow moving lanes and contain double parking, and upgrading crosswalks to increase pedestrian visibility. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (October 2012)

Columbus Avenue Parking-Protected Bicycle Path

Following a feasibility study requested by Community District 7, DOT is installing a parking-protected bicycle path on Columbus Avenue between West 96th and West 77th to improve safety for all road users along the corridor. Improvements include a "floating" parking lane on the east side of the street to retain parking and loading capacity, concrete pedestrian refuge islands and dedicated left-turn vehicle lanes installed at wide two-way intersecting streets to shorten crossing distances for pedestrians and channel vehicle traffic, mixing zone safety treatments at narrow one-way intersecting eastbound streets. The project will retain all existing vehicle travel lanes. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) Download a preliminary assessment of the project (pdf) (October 2011) Download the post-implementation presentation (pdf) (November 2012)

Bicycle Route Projects

DOT's goal is to accelerate the growth of safe cycling by providing a system of bicycle routes that traverse and connect all five boroughs, while also creating a dense, fine-grained network of bike lanes in communities where cycling is already a popular mode of transportation. Learn more

Bay Ridge Bicycle Network Extension

In response to a request from Brooklyn Community Board 10, representing the neighborhoods of Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights, DOT is proposing new connections between existing bicycle facilities and neighborhood cycling destinations. The project includes bike lanes on 68th Street, 72nd Street and Fort Hamilton Parkway as well as shared lanes on 6th Avenue, 7th Avenue and Marine Avenue. This would add 7.6 miles to the citywide bicycle network, connect with existing east-west facilities on 68th Street and 72nd Street, and connect with existing north-south facilities on 5th Avenue and 7th Avenue. The Community Board and DOT will continue to work together studying intersections and developing safety improvements for a planned implementation in 2015. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (June 2014)

Brownsville & East New York Community Bicycle Network Phase II

For the second phase of the Brownsville and East New York Bicycle Network, DOT proposes to further increase bicycle connectivity for the two neighborhoods by adding 14.5 lane miles to the bicycle network on Blake Avenue, Dumont Avenue, Hinsdale Street, Pitkin Avenue, Saratoga Avenue, Snediker Avenue, and Thomas Boyland Street. DOT will install a mix of shared lanes and bicycle lanes to these streets. In addition to adding bicycle connects, these changes will organize traffic and improve safety for all road users. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 16 in June 2014)

Flushing Avenue Bicycle Route

The proposed Flushing Avenue project offers an important east-west bicycle route between the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway, Downtown Brooklyn, the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges with the developing Ridgewood bicycle network. This facility would add 5.1 miles to the existing network and connect the north-south routes on Classon, Franklin, Bedford, Thompkins, and Throop Avenues. The design treatment for the corridor consists primarily of shared lanes. Where feasible, bike lanes are proposed. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 1 Transportation Committee in May 2014)

Franklin Avenue Transportation Improvements

Based on community input from an April 2, 2014 workshop, DOT is proposing safety and mobility enhancements to Franklin Avenue including improved signal operation and traffic flow, widened parking and travel lanes, a dedicated bicycle lane, parking regulation changes, and concrete pedestrian islands on Atlantic Avenue. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 8 in May 2014)

East 106th Street to Randalls Island: Street Safety and Improved Access

In response to community requests for improved access to Randalls Island, DOT is proposing new connections between the recreational amenities of Central Park, the East River Greenway and the 103th Street Pedestrian Bridge to Randalls Island. This project will calm traffic on East 106th Street by reducing the number of travel lanes from four to two, adding a striped median with left turn bays, and installing a bike lane in each direction from Fifth Avenue to the FDR Service Road. Two pedestrian islands are proposed at Second Avenue and Third Avenue to reduce crossing distance. A two-way bike connection on East 102nd Street, combined with the existing bike routes on 1st and 2nd Avenues, will connect the new bike lanes on East 106th Street to the 103rd Street Bridge to the Greenway and Randalls Island. A new curb cut and bike stamps will facilitate cyclist access to the bridge.

The route for this project was revised based on community input. The initial proposal was to connect East 106th Street to the 103rd Street Bridge via a two-way path on the FDR Service Road. In response to community concerns about using the FDR Service Road, DOT modified the design to install a two-way connection on East 102nd Street instead. Download a slideshow about the revised project (pdf) (presented to Manhattan Community Board 11 in May 2014) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Manhattan Community Board 11 in April 2014)

Manhattan Waterfront Greenway - East 37th Street Connector

This project will improve access to and from the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway at East 37th Street, where there is currently a break in the Greenway before it resumes at East 60th Street. There is increased need for improved Greenway access at this location due to the East River Ferry, Citibike station, and upcoming improvements to Glick Park. The existing Greenway connection lacks sufficient visibility, wayfinding, and pavement markings. The proposal includes improvements to the exsting path from East 34th Street to East 37th Street, installation of a two-way path on East 37th Street between the FDR Service Road and connections to Second Avenue through shared lanes on East 38th Street and East 35th Street and a two-way path on First Avenue between East 38th Street and East 37th Street. These routes increase safety by enabling cyclists to use routes that avoid the FDR Service Road and the entrance to the Midtown Tunnel. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014)

Kent Avenue South Improvements

In response to community concerns about speeding, this project narrows Kent Avenue between Williamsburg Street West and Clymer Street and calms through traffic in both directions. Parking will be moved from the west curb to the east side of the center median to improve the street alignment with Kent Avenue south of the Brooklyn Queens Expressway and north of Clymer. On the west side of the street, the northbound bike lane will be moved from the sidewalk onto the roadway, easing the transition along the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway for both pedestrians and bicycles. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 1 in December 2013)

Washington Heights Bicycle Network, Phase I

Following a two year planning effort with Community Board 12, this project is the first of a multi-phase installation of bicycle facilities in Washington Heights. The project will provide 5.4 lane miles of new bicycle facilities. This includes bike lanes on West 177th and 180th Streets and Ft George Avenue and a two-way parking-protected path on Ft. George Hill. Amsterdam Avenue, a high crash corridor, will be redesigned with new left turn lanes and a mix of shared and bicycle lanes. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (April 2014)

Hudson Street Parking-Protected Bicycle Path

In response to a community request for a parking-protected bicycle path on Hudson Street, DOT proposes to improve the existing buffered bike lanes between West Houston Street and Bleecker Street, and between West 14th Street and Eighth Avenue by upgrading them both to parking protected-bicycle paths. The proposed paths would improve safety for cyclists, shorten pedestrian crossing distances, and provide simpler and safer left turns, all while retaining the existing vehicular capacity. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Manhattan Community Board 2 in April 2014)

High Bridge and Bridge Park Access – Pedestrian and Bicycle Connections

In response to community requests for better access to the High Bridge—scheduled to reopen in 2014—and the recently completed Bridge Park on the Harlem River, DOT plans to install a series of bicycle and pedestrian improvements in the High Bridge neighborhood of the Bronx. This project will establish West 170th Street as a highly visible pedestrian and bicycle corridor leading up to the High Bridge. It will enhance safety, particularly at challenging intersections such as Edward L. Grant Highway and West 170th Street. The project will also complete connections between the High Bridge and the existing bicycle network, create new bicycle routes to and from the waterfront, designate a temporary greenway path along the waterfront to Bridge Park. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 4 in April 2014)

Lafayette Street and Fourth Avenue Parking Protected Bicycle Path

This project will improve the existing buffered bike lane between Prince Street and East 12th Street by upgrading it to a parking protected bike path. In addition, a bike lane on both sides of Fourth Avenue between East 12th and 14th Streets will provide cyclists with safer options for turning onto East 14th or continuing on Park Avenue. The bicycle route on Lafayette Avenue between Spring and Prince Streets will remain as a buffered bike lane to accommodate operations of the firehouse. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Canarsie Park Connector

The Canarsie Park Connector is a proposed two-way recreational, multi-use trail along the east side of Paerdegat Basin, from Flatlands Avenue to Seaview Avenue on East 76th Street and Paerdegat Avenue North. The project will create new recreational space, simplify alignment along the entire corridor, and connect the surrounding neighborhood to parks and the new path with new crossings. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (February 2014)

Bond Street Bicycle Route

The proposed Bond Street project offers an important northbound bike route connection between Gowanus, Cobble Hill and Downtown Brooklyn. This facility would add 0.9 miles to the existing network and connect with the east-west routes on 3rd Street, Union Avenue, Bedford Avenue, Bergen Street, Dean Street, and Schermerhorn Street. The design treatment for the corridor consists primarily of shared lanes. Where feasible, bike lanes are proposed. No parking will be removed. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (February 2014)

Jamaica Bay Greenway

The Jamaica Bay Greenway is a proposed 28-mile path for active transportation and recreation serving communities surrounding Jamaica Bay. More than ten miles of Greenway, including sections in Canarsie, Broad Channel, and Marine Park, are already in place and welcoming large numbers of visitors. The Greenway provides direct access to more than 10,000 acres of parkland and beaches, including regional destinations such as Jacob Riis Park and the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. Beginning in March, 2014, DOT will lead a community-based planning process to develop an implementation plan to complete and enhance the Greenway. The planning process will take place in partnership with the National Park Service, the Department of Parks & Recreation, and the Regional Plan Association, and will build upon previous studies and planning efforts. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (February 2014) Download slides from public workshops conducted in March and April, 2014 (pdf)

Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian and Bicycle Improvements

In response to community requests for bicycle and pedestrian improvements on the Pulaski Bridge, DOT proposes building a new bicycle path on the bridge adjacent to the existing shared path. The design includes a new barrier to protect bicyclists from motor vehicles. This proposed path would double the space on the bridge dedicated to bicyclists and pedestrians, enhance safety by separating those two modes and improve access to Long Island City subway stations for Brooklyn residents. Download a presentation about the project (pdf)

Queens Community Board 2 Bike Routes

In early 2012, Queens Community Board 2 and Council Member Van Bramer approached DOT to co-host public forums to solicit community input on proposed bicycle routes throughout the Community District. Following two forums and an online survey, DOT proposed routes that expand the bike network with new east-west and north-south connections, as well as safe routes directing cyclists to the East River Ferry and Pulaski and Queensboro Bridges. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Community Board 2 in November 2013) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to the Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in October 2013) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to bike forum in July 2012) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to the Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in June 2013)

South Street-Battery Maritime Buliding Shared Bicycle and Pedestrian Path

DOT proposes creating a missing and vital link in the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway by connecting the bike paths on East River Esplanade to the north and Peter Minuit Plaza to the south. The design will improve bicycle and pedestrian circulation and safety in front of the Battery Maritime Building on South Street by creating painted curb extensions; cyclists and pedestrians will share the space. In addition, queuing space will be created on the southbound direction side of South Street for vehicles servicing Governors Island. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Second Avenue Parking Protected Bicycle Path Upgrade

DOT proposes upgrading the existing curbside buffered bike lane on Second Avenue between 14th and 23rd Streets to a parking protected bike path similar to the design located uptown and downtown of the project area. The proposed buffered lane adds parking back to the east side of the street to make the bike path parking-protected. The project will also provide simpler, safer left turns, shorten pedestrian crossing distances, and will improve the safety for all road users. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

West Broadway and Church Street Bicycle Facilities

DOT proposes a new bicycle route connecting Greenwich Village to Lower Manhattan. The route will consist of a mix of bicycle lanes and shared lanes on Church Street, Sixth Avenue, West Broadway, LaGuardia Place, Washington Square South, Washington Square East, Washington Square North, Broome Street and Varick Street. The routes will help organize the street, support short local trips by bike. No parking spaces will be removed as part of this project. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Columbus Avenue Parking-Protected Bicycle Path

Following a feasibility study requested by Community District 7, DOT is installing a parking-protected bicycle path on Columbus Avenue between West 96th and West 77th to improve safety for all road users along the corridor. Improvements include a "floating" parking lane on the east side of the street to retain parking and loading capacity, concrete pedestrian refuge islands and dedicated left-turn vehicle lanes installed at wide two-way intersecting streets to shorten crossing distances for pedestrians and channel vehicle traffic, mixing zone safety treatments at narrow one-way intersecting eastbound streets. The project will retain all existing vehicle travel lanes. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) Download a preliminary assessment of the project (pdf) (October 2011) Download the post-implementation presentation (pdf) (November 2012)

Neighborhood Slow Zones

Neighborhood Slow Zones are a community-based program that reduces the speed limit from 30 mph to 20 mph and adds safety measures within a select area in order to change driver behavior. The goal of the Neighborhood Slow Zone program is to lower the frequency and severity of crashes. Slow Zones also seek to enhance quality of life by reducing cut-through traffic and traffic noise in residential neighborhoods. DOT creates slow zones in response to applications from communities. Learn more

Brownsville-East New York Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Brooklyn neighborhood of Brownsville-East New York applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in May, 2013. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Brooklyn Community Board 16 in June 2014)

Jackson Heights Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Queens neighborhood of Jackson Heights applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in May, 2013. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014) Download a fact sheet about the slow zone (pdf) (September 2013)

Norwood Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Norwood applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in May, 2013. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (March 2014) Download a fact sheet about the project (pdf) (September 2013)

Elmhurst Neighborhood Slow Zone

P.S. 89 (the Elmhurst School) applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February of 2012. The application was accepted due to a high crash rating, a large amount of schools and daycare centers, good natural boundaries and a strong residential character. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Auburndale Neighborhood Slow Zone

The neighborhood of Auburndale, Queens applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Rosebank Neighborhood Slow Zone

The neighborhood of Rosebank, Staten Island applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in January, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Boerum Hill Neighborhood Slow Zone

The neighborhood of Boerum Hill, Brooklyn applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Riverdale Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Riverdale applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in November, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 8 in October 2012)

Eastchester Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Eastchester applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 11 in September 2012)

East Elmhurst/Jackson Heights Slow Zone

City Council Member Daniel Dromm applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February of 2012. The application was accepted due to a high crash rating, an ideal size, good natural boundaries and a strong residential character. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Dongan Hills Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Staten Island neighborhood of Dongan Hills applied for a Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed Zones high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

NYC Plaza Program

DOT works with selected not-for-profit organizations to create neighborhood plazas throughout the City to transforming underused streets into vibrant, social public spaces. The NYC Plaza Program is a key part of the City's effort to ensure that all New Yorkers live within a 10-minute walk of quality open space. Learn more

Lowery and Bliss Plazas

Sunnyside Shines BID applied to Round 6 of the plaza program to revitalize the existing public spaces under the elevated 7 Train at the 40th Street-Lowery Street and 46th Street-Bliss Street stations. If approved, concrete will be used the infill the former roadway at 46th Street creating a consistent and level public space in keeping with 40th Street and other stations along this section of the 7 train. The plazas will be furnished with moveable tables and chairs, planters and granite blocks. The community outreach stage of this project included a community workshop. Sunnyside Shines BID will be responsible for the maintenance of these spaces once implemented. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Queens Community Board 2 Transportation Committee in May 2014)

Select Bus Service

Select Bus Service is a program to improve bus speed, reliability, and convenience, implemented as a partnership between DOT and the MTA. Select Bus Service is New York City’s brand of bus rapid transit, a system implemented around the world to provide a cost effective approach to transit improvements. Select Bus Service improves bus service through features such as dedicated bus lanes, off-board fare payment systems, and transit signal priority, as well as pedestrian access improvements to bus stops. Learn more

Safe Routes To Schools

The Safe Routes to School initiative focuses safety improvements around city schools with the highest crash rates nearby. Each of schools in the program receives an individualized planning study which determines both short-term and long-term measures to improve safety. Learn more

Safety Improvements for PS 347, Manhattan

To address high crash rates near PS 347, located at Second Avenue and East 23rd Street in Manhattan, DOT proposes curb extensions and neckdowns. Download the presentation

Safe Streets For Seniors

Safe Streets for Seniors is a pedestrian safety initiative for older New Yorkers. The Safe Streets for Seniors program studies crash data, and then develops and implements mitigation measures to improve the safety of seniors and other pedestrians, as well as all road users in New York City. Learn more

Capital Projects

Capital street projects are major street reconstruction projects, ranging from milling and repaving to full reconstruction of the roadbed, sidewalks, sewer and water pipes, and other utilities. Learn more

Brooklyn Bridge Gateway: Tillary-Adams Reconstruction

The intersection of Tillary and Adams Streets, the to Brooklyn from the Brooklyn Bridge, is currently being redesigned by DOT and the Department of Design and Construction as part of a capital reconstruction project. Construction is expected to begin in 2014 with a multi-million dollar budget, encompassing all of Tillary Street and portions of Adams Street. Learn more

Broadway and Nagle Avenue Pedestrian Safety Improvements

DOT proposes concrete sidewalk extensions at the intersection of Broadway with Nagle and Hillside Avenues. This improvement will help to normalize this complex intersection, making crossing distances significantly shorter and easier to navigate for pedestrians. By closing existing slip turn lanes and creating a four corner intersection with right angle turns, movements will be clarified and made safer for all users. These improvements will take place through the capital process, in collaboration with the Department of Design and Construction. Download a presentation about the project (pdf)

Astor Place–Cooper Square Improvements

Astor Place and Cooper Square serve as the gateway to the East Village and have a high level of pedestrian traffic due to the presence of a number of important institutions and transportation connections. This project will improve pedestrian mobility and community quality of life. The project brings a number of improvements to the street network and creates large areas of pedestrian space. Traffic will be realigned along Fourth Avenue creating additional open space adjacent to Peter Cooper Park, the pedestrian island housing the northbound 6 train will roughly double in size, and Astor Place between Lafayette Street and Fourth Avenue will be pedestrianized. In an effort to increase safety and shorten crossing distances. Medians will be constructed in the center of Third Avenue between 4th and 9th Streets.

North Flatbush Streetscape

Flatbush Avenue is a busy retail and transportation corridor surrounded by thriving neighborhoods with multiple subway stations and bus stops to serve these land uses, resulting in significant pedestrian volumes. Flatbush Avenue accommodates high volumes of local and through vehicles, however, the impacts of these vehicles on the pedestrian experience can be negative. This project, requested by the North Flatbush Avenue BID, will enhance pedestrian safety and the public realm, integrating all modes of transportation into the streetscape. Pedestrian space will be upgraded and in some cases expanded, including sidewalks and several triangles that are formed when Flatbush Avenue intersects with the numbered avenues. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Reconstruction of Broad Channel

Due to regular and sometimes severe flooding, West 11th, 12th, and 13th Roads from Cross Bay Boulevard in Broad Channel, Queens, will be reconstructed at a higher elevation. In addition, new bulkheads will be constructed at the bay end of each street. These streets were selected due to their low grades and their susceptibility to flooding during high tides. This project will decrease the amount of time that the streets are flooded, decrease the frequency and severity of the flooding, and enable the water on the streets to drain back into the bay through the use of one way valves. Download a presentation about the project (pdf)

DUMBO/Vinegar Hill Street and Plaza Reconstruction

DOT is working with DDC, the DUMBO Improvement District, and the communities of DUMBO and Vinegar Hill to develop a design for a $20 million capital project to reconstruct cobble roadways and subsurface utilities on multiple blocks of DUMBO and Vinegar Hill and build out Pearl Plaza, a successful public space that DOT and DUMBO Improvement District implemented in 2007 using temporary materials. The streets in the project area consist of granite cobbles, generally in poor condition, with some sections of asphalt. These conditions impede bicycles, are difficult for pedestrians and do not meet Americans with Disability Act (ADA) guidelines. At the same time, community members feel strongly about preserving the character of the neighborhood to the greatest extent possible. DOT is committed to a design that restores all streets with granite cobble in a way that makes these streets available for all users, including cyclists. For the Pearl Plaza, the goal is to create a design responsive to community desires, that incorporates seating and landscape elements in a manner that is consistent with the context, and that provides maximum flexibility for programming. The plaza design will connect Pearl Plaza to an adjacent public space under the Manhattan Bridge Arch. This design project includes extensive community outreach, with three public workshops held as of March, 2013. Following a vigorous discussion about the cobble roadway design at a workshop in January, 2013, the designers incorporated neighborhood feedback and presented revised concepts at a workshop on March 20th. The project team then built granite cobble mock-ups which were viewed by approximately 50-60 members of the public. Based on public input, a presentation was made to the Community Board 2 executive board, which endorsed the project on July 22, 2013. The project design will be submitted and presented to the Landmarks Preservation Commission in September 2013. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Community Board 2 in July 2013) Download the workshop presentation materials (pdf) (March 2013)

Roberto Clemente Plaza

This project will permanently improve what had been a complex intersection of five busy streets, providing 15,000 square feet of vibrant pedestrian plaza space, safer and shorter pedestrian crossings, improved bus movement and easier transit transfers and bike lanes. It will also allow for a memorial to the late Roberto Clemente. The new car-free area will provide greatly needed pedestrian space in a busy shopping district and will enhance commuters’ transfers between two subway lines and five bus lines.

Bridge Reconstruction Projects

DOT owns, operates, and maintains 789 bridges and tunnels throughout New York, including the Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg and Ed Koch Queensboro Bridges. DOT performs many bridge construction projects, ranging from preventative maintenance to installing entirely new bridges. Learn more

Reconstruction of Belt Parkway Bridges

In 2009 DOT began reconstruction of seven bridges and their approaches on the Belt Parkway. These bridges, over Bay Ridge Avenue, Nostrand Avenue, Gerritsen Inlet, Mill Basin, Paerdegat Basin, Rockaway Parkway, and Fresh Creek Basin Bridges, all are original structures, built beginning in 1939. These bridges have outlived their useful lives and must be replaced. Learn more on the project’s Facebook page

Brooklyn Bridge Rehabilitation

DOT is currently rehabilitating, repairing and re-striping of the ramps and approaches to the Brooklyn Bridge, to improve safety and reduce congestion along both the Brooklyn-side and Manhattan-side approaches, particularly from the FDR Drive. In addition, the entire bridge will be repainted to prevent steel corrosion. Learn more

Manhattan Bridge

Work is underway on the Manhattan Bridge to replace all 628 bridge suspenders, rewrap main cables, replace and update lighting, and install access platforms for the bridge towers. During the construction, detours will sometimes be required for pedestrians and bicylists. The project is scheduled to continue until Summer 2013. This work is part of a complete overhaul of the bridge, which began in 1982 Learn more

Project Planning

Bleecker, Houston, Bowery Traffic and Transportation Study

DOT is performing this study to determine how to improve traffic circulation and enhance safety for all road users while addressing community concerns. The area under consideration is bounded by Essex Street and Avenue A to the east, Mercer Street to the west, East 5th and East 8th Streets to the north and Spring and Delancey Streets to the south. The study is assessing traffic and transportation conditions in the area, and identifying short and long-term safety improvements. Issues such as land-use, traffic congestion, pedestrian & bike safety, truck activity and accidents are being studied in detail. At a second public meeting for the study, on February 21, 2012, DOT presented an analysis of the existing conditions in the study area. The analysis covers demographics, zoning & land use, traffic, parking, pedestrians & bicycles, safety, public transit, and goods Movement. DOT held a public meeting for the study on November 20, 2013. At the meeting, DOT presented the future conditions analysis with recommendations. The recommendations and improvement measures that were generated are mainly roadway geometry changes, parking regulation changes and pedestrian safety enhancements. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to first public meeting in May 2010) Download the presentation slides (pdf) (presented to second multiple meeting in February 2012) Download the presentation slides (pdf) (presented to third public meeting in October 2013)

Red Hook Streetcar Feasibility Study

DOT conducted a five-month study to determine the feasibility of a running a streetcar route in the Brooklyn neighborhood of Red Hook. This initial analysis will help determine if this mode, once a staple of New York City’s streets, is a viable method of connecting the residents and businesses of Red Hook with Brooklyn’s broader transportation network and supporting economic development in the area. The study is funded through a Federal Transit Administration grant secured by U.S. Representative Nydia Velázquez and has long had the support of the Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce. Learn more about the study