2012 Projects

This is a list of past community presentations from DOT projects from 2012. DOT generally presents projects at community board meetings where the public can ask questions and provide feedback. Contact DOT if you have a question, comment or concern about a project See a list of current projects See lists of projects from other recent years: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013

the Bronx

Riverdale Neighborhood Slow Zone

neighborhood slow zones

The Bronx neighborhood of Riverdale applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in November, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 8 in October 2012)

Eastchester Neighborhood Slow Zone

neighborhood slow zones

The Bronx neighborhood of Eastchester applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 11 in September 2012)

Grand Concourse-Mosholu Parkway Pedestrian Safety Improvements

complete streets major transportation projects

The northern blocks of Grand Concourse at the Mosholu Parkway will have shorter crosswalks, a new bus boarding plaza, improved walking and biking access with an all-around safer street design. Learn more (pdf)

233rd Street Safety Improvements

complete streets major transportation projects

DOT has identified 233rd Street between Laconia and Provost Avenues in the Bronx as a High Crash Corridor. The proposed project includes removal of one travel lane in each direction, installation of painted center median with left turn bays, a wide parking lane stripe and a concrete curb extension at Baychester Avenue. These improvements will reduce speeding, better organize traffic flow and provide safer pedestrian crossings. The Provost Avenue extension includes installation of high visibility crosswalks, parking lane stripes and dual approach lanes to Boston Road to relieve congestion. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Bartow Avenue & Baychester Avenue

major transportation projects

The intersection of Bartow and Baychester Avenues has been identified as a high pedestrian crash location and is adjacent to Bay Plaza shopping mall in Co-op City. The Phase I improvements include construction of a bus stop island, new high visibility crosswalks and ramps, as well as street beautification on a portion of the unused roadbed. Improvements in Phase II include re-striping the northbound approach of Baychester Avenue to include dual left turn lanes, installation of a green pedestrian safety island, pedestrian fencing on portions of center medians and painted channelization along Baychester Avenue, and high visibility crosswalks. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Brooklyn

Borinquen Place Traffic Calming

complete streets

In response to community requests as well as recent pedestrian fatalities along the Borinquen Place corridor in Willismsburg Brooklyn, DOT is proposing significant pedestrian safety measures to the roadway between Hooper Street and Marcy Avenue. Traffic calming measures, much needed pedestrian space, and landscaping are also included in the plan. After implementation, the corridor will see shorter crosswalks, several pedestrian safety islands, clearer vehicular traffic patterns, and new crosswalks. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Pennsylvania Avenue Traffic Calming

complete streets major transportation projects

Pennsylvania Avenue is a major corridor for buses, pedestrians, and motor vehicles, and passes through Spring Creek Towers (Starrett City). In response to community concerns about speeding and pedestrian safety, and after working closely with the Starrett Tenants Association and other groups, DOT proposes to redesign Pennsylvania Avenue from Flatlands Avenue to Seaview Avenue to reduce speeding, improve safety for all modes, and provide opportunities for greening. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Midwood Senior Pedestrian Focus Area

Safe Streets for Seniors is a major pedestrian safety initiative for older New Yorkers. DOT examined accident histories across the city and identified 25 city neighborhoods that had a high number of pedestrian crashes or injuries. DOT engineers evaluated pedestrian conditions in these neighborhoods from a senior’s perspective and made engineering changes, such as extending pedestrian crossing times at crosswalks, shortening crossing distances, altering curbs and sidewalks, restricting vehicle turns and narrowing roadways. The following report details the outcome of the study in the Midwood Senior Pedestrian Focus Area in Brooklyn. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2010) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (November 2010)

Lefferts Boulevard Safety Improvements

complete streets major transportation projects

In an effort to improve safety along Lefferts Boulevard, DOT proposes removing one travel lane in each direction from 149th Avenue to Rockaway Boulevard to reduce speeding, installing left turn bays to organize traffic and keep through traffic moving, installing a parking stripe to narrow moving lanes and contain double parking, and upgrading crosswalks to increase pedestrian visibility. Download a presentation of the proposal (pdf)

Boerum Hill Neighborhood Slow Zone

neighborhood slow zones

The neighborhood of Boerum Hill, Brooklyn applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Bartel-Pritchard Square Pedestrian Improvements

complete streets

In response to requests from the community, DOT is pursuing safety improvements at this traffic circle between Park Slope & Windsor Terrace. A new signal has been added to protect pedestrians crossing 15th Street. Other improvements are proposed such as shorter pedestrian crosswalks with painted sidewalk extensions. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Hicks Street Northbound Traffic Calming

complete streets

Hicks Street is a major north-south corridor adjacent to the sub-grade Brooklyn Queens Expressway. Five bridges across the Expressway create important east-west pedestrian and vehicular corridors between neighborhoods. This project enhances the roadway at existing crosswalks and reevaluates parking regulations to slow speeding vehicles along the corridor. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (June 2012)

Lafayette Avenue Traffic Calming and Bicycle Route

complete streets Bicycle Route Projects

Lafayette Avenue is an important corridor for buses, motorists and cyclists from Downtown Brooklyn to Ft. Greene, Clinton Hill and Bedford-Stuyvesant. DOT proposes changing signal timing from the existing 25 mph progression to 20 mph in order to calm traffic and improve safety for pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists. An enhanced shared lane from Fulton Street to Classon Avenue will provide guidance for cyclists and alert motorists to the presence of cyclists. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

86th Street Corridor Improvements

complete streets

In response to community concerns about safety, DOT proposes removing a travel lane and redesigning 86th Street between Shore Road and Fourth Avenue to install a flush center median, left turn bays, and wide parking lanes. The intersection of 86th Street and Fourth Avenue is a High Pedestrian Crash Location and the corridor ranks in the top 88th percentile in Brooklyn for pedestrian injuries and fatalities. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Manhattan

Broadway Boulevard

Herald Square after its redesign

complete streets Bicycle Route Projects major transportation projects

In 2008, DOT created a ribbon of public gathering spaces along Broadway. A palette of landscaping and distinctive furniture brought new foot traffic, along with a protected bicycle lane, through the Fashion Center from the shopping district of Herald Square to the entertainment capital of Times Square. In 2012, response to requests from the community and the local business improvement district, DOT redesigned Broadway between West 35th and 42nd Streets. The proposed plan moves the bicycle facility out of the pedestrian plaza space and into the street, reducing bicycle and pedestrian conflicts while enlarging the plaza. Other safety benefits will be realized as the street profile is modified to match actual vehicle volumes. Download details on Broadway Boulevard around Times Square to Herald Square (May 2008) Download the slideshow on Broadway at Madison Square (May 2008) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Ninth Avenue-Gansevoort Area

complete streets

Ninth Avenue between Gansevoort and West 16th Streets runs through the heart of the Meatpacking District up to Chelsea Market. This critical stretch of roadway is receiving upgraded water and sewer lines, and a resetting of its historic cobblestones. In addition, the plazas along it are being reconstructed and designed by a world-class team of architects and landscape architects as permanent amenities. The geometric design, which is influenced by both historic and pragmatic considerations, and has implications for traffic movement throughout the adjacent neighborhoods, was presented for feedback to the Transportation Committee of Community Board 2 on Tuesday September 11, 2012. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (September 2012) Download an interim report on the project (January 2009)

Madison Avenue Bus Lane

complete streets

Madison Avenue is an important bus corridor, carrying hundreds of local and commuter buses during peak hours, as well as serving other pedestrian, private vehicle, and delivery needs. This project will extend the hours of the existing bus lanes so that they are in effect at all times, will create left turn bays to help improve traffic flow, and will change curb regulations to provide increased afternoon legal commercial vehicle loading space. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Washington Heights Safe Streets for Seniors

safe streets for seniors

DOT is proposing two major projects within the Washington Heights Senior Area. The first is on Broadway, Wadsworth and West 173rd Street; the second at Ft. George, St. Nicolas, West 193rd Street and Audobon. In addition to these projects, DOT proposes general improvements throughout the project area. Improvements include pedestrian safety islands to offer refuge when crossing the street, curb extensions to shorten crossing distance, signal timing changes to optimize traffic flow and give pedestrians more time to cross the street, and markings refurbishment. General area upgrades include high visibility crosswalk installation, signal retiming and broken pedestrian ramp repair. The Washington Heights Senior Area is also being evaluated for countdown signals and Citybench installation. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Bowling Green Pedestrian Improvements

complete streets

Pedestrians currently crowd into the roadway around the Charging Bull south to Bowling Green. The improvements will add space for pedestrians to Whitehall Street’s excessively wide roadbed. A beige surface treatment will be protected by flexible delineators and planters maintained by the Downtown Alliance. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Division Street Pedestrian Plaza

complete streets

Excess space along Division Street between Market Street and Bowery will be transformed into a new pedestrian plaza. Currently, this space allows charter buses and other vehicles to double park and idle, creating an uncomfortable experience for pedestrians. Off-hours, the excess space encourages speeding. The reclamation of this space will help to mitigate these issues while providing seating and greenery to enhance the neighborhood. Download the presentation slides (pdf)

Midtown Midblock Enhancements

complete streets

Known by thousands who work and live in the neighborhood, public arcades run mid-block from West 51st to West 57th Streets between Sixth and Seventh Avenues. In response to community requests asking for safety improvements and corridor enhancements, DOT has developed a plan to connect the midtown arcades, which are privately-owned public spaces by installing stop signs, crosswalks (some raised), and pedestrians-only waiting areas. These improvements will allow pedestrians to cross safely between blocks through the entire passageway. Download the Midtown Mid-Block presentation slides (pdf) Download an update on the project (pdf)

Delancey Street Safety Improvements

complete streets

DOT has proposed comprehensive safety and traffic flow improvements for Delancey Street, a key Manhattan artery for pedestrian and motor vehicle traffic. The upgrades include shortening many crosswalks along the corridor, clarifying and delineating travel lanes, improvements to traffic signal timing and an enhanced streetscape at the entrance to the Williamsburg Bridge. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Second Avenue Bicycle Route, 100th to 125th Streets

Bicycle Route Projects major transportation projects

In response to requests from the community, DOT added a parking-protected bicycle path on Second Avenue from 125th to 100th Streets, a top-ranking corridor for crashes in Manhattan. The project includes islands that shorten crossing distances for pedestrians, updated parking regulations and reduced conflicts at left turns. The new path complements the existing north-bound lane on First Avenue.

Central Park Drives Safety Improvements

complete streets

The Central Park drives are some of the most popular for places walking and biking in New York City. The drives growing popularity with both residents and visitors has created a need for upgrades and enhancements. Similar to a recently completed project on the Prospect Park drives, this project will enhance comfort and safety for all of the drives users by increasing consistency and predictability. Users will no longer be expected to use different lanes at different times and days of the week. The pedestrian lane on the drive will be doubled in width (typically from 7 feet to 14 feet) and an 11-foot-wide bicycle lane will organize cyclists by speed. Pedestrians crossing the drives will benefit from a major reduction in crossing distance. In many places, the crossing distance will be reduced from 30 to 11 feet. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

East 43rd Street Gateway Plaza

NYC plaza program

In 2011, the Tudor City Association requested that DOT investigate possible enhancements to the street end of East 43rd Street, which is connected to First Avenue by a staircase that serves as a pedestrian gateway to the UN and Tudor City. DOT is investigating how to enhance this cul-de-sac to make it a better public space for residents of Tudor City and the hundreds of pedestrians that walk through the site every day. Possible enhancements may include a gravel surface treatment, moveable tables and chairs and other informal seating, benches, and planters. Download the presentation on East 43rd Street (March 2012)

Queens

East Elmhurst/Jackson Heights Slow Zone

neighborhood slow zones

City Council Member Daniel Dromm applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February of 2012. The application was accepted due to a high crash rating, an ideal size, good natural boundaries and a strong residential character. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Queens Boulevard at 71st Avenue

complete streets

This intersection was identified as a 2008 High Pedestrian Crash Location. The intersection has long crossing distances and substandard refuge space for pedestrians. DOT plans to extend and widen two service road medians in the west and east crosswalks, add an 11-ft. parking lane stripe on the service roads for one block in each direction, and include peg-a-tracs for left turning vehicles from Queens Boulevard. Download the presentation slides (pdf)

Rego Park Safe Streets for Seniors Project

complete streets safe streets for seniors

DOT proposes pedestrian safety improvements for 62nd Drive and 63rd Road, parallel wide roads with low traffic volumes and high pedestrian injury rates, in the Rego Park Safe Streets for Seniors pedestrian focus area. The study limits are Queens Blvd to Grand Central Parkway (112th St), and 63rd Ave from Queens Boulevard to Austin Street. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (March 2014)

Hillside Avenue Pedestrian Safety Islands

complete streets

Hillside Avenue between 172nd and 199th Streets ranks in the top 5% of streets in Queens for both pedestrian and vehicle injuries and fatalities. This area also falls within the Jamaica Hills Safe Streets for Seniors project. In order to protect pedestrians and calm turning vehicles, DOT proposes five green pedestrian safety islands at key locations throughout the corridor. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Newtown Plaza

NYC plaza program

Located along a bustling retail corridor with close access to subway and bus transit, safety at the five-legged intersection of Newtown Avenue, 30th Avenue, and 33rd Street in Astoria has been a community concern for some time. This project seeks to create a safer intersection for pedestrians and drivers. At a public workshop on June 5, 2012, DOT asked the community for feedback on two options. First, as part of a DOT school safety project, there is a plan to build out concrete curb extensions which will make crossings shorter and normalize the intersection to calm vehicles as they turn onto Newtown Ave. Second, as part of DOT''s citywide effort to create plazas in neighborhoods that lack open space, DOT could plan a pedestrian plaza by closing part of Newtown Avenue to create a safe crossing and provide amenities to create a community gathering place. This project will be presented to Queens Community Board 1, the meeting date is still to be determined. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to community board 1 in November 2010)

Staten Island

Dongan Hills Neighborhood Slow Zone

neighborhood slow zones

The Staten Island neighborhood of Dongan Hills applied for a Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed Zones high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

New Brighton-St. George Neighborhood Slow Zone

neighborhood slow zones

The Staten Island neighborhoods of New Brighton and St. George applied for Neighborhood Slow Zones in January and February of 2012. The applications were accepted due to widespread community support, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Little Clove Road Safety Improvements

complete streets major transportation projects

Little Clove Road is a high crash corridor with a high percentage of speeding vehicles that serves both as a local, residential street as well as an informal service road for the Staten Island Expressway. DOT will improve the safety of the area and discourage service road uses by introducing traffic calming and reducing excess road capacity to better organize traffic flow and to reduce speeding and weaving. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)