2016 Projects

NYC DOT presents many projects at community board meetings where the public may ask questions and provide feedback. Listed below are the community presentations of NYC DOT projects implemented in 2016. List of Current Projects Projects from other years: 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020 If you have questions, comments or concerns please contact the NYC DOT Borough Commissioners.

Current Projects

Bronx

138th Street & Major Deegan Expressway Safety Improvements & Congestion Mitigation

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT proposed safety improvements at the intersection of 138th St and the Major Deegan Expressway at the foot of the Madison Avenue Bridge in the Bronx. 138th St is a Bronx Vision Zero priority corridor, and the intersection had 182 injuries from crashes between 2010 and 2014. The proposal included restricting the westbound left turn from 138th St onto southbound Exterior St. The turn restriction eliminates a difficult turn and provides congestion relief by reducing the amount of vehicles “blocking the box” at Gerard Avenue. In addition, signal time was redistributed to other signal phases to improve vehicular and pedestrian mobility at the intersection.

138th Street & Major Deegan Expressway - presented to Bronx Community Board 1 in March 2016 (pdf)

Baychester Avenue Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

Baychester Ave is a Vision Zero Priority Corridor with 7.9 Pedestrian Killed or Severely Injured (KSI) crashes per mile. This proposal added three pedestrian islands and one curb extension, which provide safer pedestrian crossings, create simpler, safer left turns from cross streets, and reduce motor vehicle and pedestrian conflict. This proposal also added two new midblock signals and pedestrian crossings to reduce the distance between crossing opportunities for pedestrians. The project redesigned 0.5 miles of a Vision Zero Priority Corridor and one Priority Intersection.

Baychester Avenue Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Bronx Community Board 12 in May 2016 (pdf)

Bivona Street & Reeds Mill Lane Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

Following requests from the community and NYCHA Boston Secor Houses for additional crossings on Bivona St, NYC DOT proposed two midblock enhanced crossings with concrete refuge islands on Bivona St between Boston Rd and Reeds Mill Ln. The enhanced crossings expand the pedestrian network and improve accessibility. The proposal also included traffic calming along Bivona St and Reeds Mill Ln.

Bivona Street & Reeds Mill Lane Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Bronx CB 12 Transportation Committee in March 2016 (pdf)

Broadway at Van Cortlandt Park Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

In response to a request from Council Member Andrew Cohen, NYC DOT held a community workshop in Riverdale to discuss potential safety improvements for pedestrians and cyclists on the Broadway corridor along the west side of Van Cortlandt Park. The intent of this workshop was to identify how community members interact with Broadway and to identify safety issues that they experience.

Broadway at Van Cortlandt Park Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Improvements - presented in November 2015 (pdf)

Broadway, West 225 Street to West 228 Street Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

In response to community requests and a request from Council Member Rodriguez, NYC DOT proposed safety improvements on Broadway between W 225 St – W 228 St. This proposal added two expanded medians at W 225 St and, at W 228 St, two expanded medians and one bus island. The improvements created shorter pedestrian crossings and simpler, safer left turns from cross streets, reducing motor vehicle and pedestrian conflict.

Broadway, West 225 Street to West 228 Street Safety Improvements - presented to Bronx Community Board 8 in May 2016 (pdf)

Bruckner Boulevard & East 138th Street, Randall’s Island Connection Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

This project proposed pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements connecting Mott Haven, Port Morris and Randall’s Island. At the Vision Zero Priority Intersection of Bruckner Blvd and E 138th St, improved signal timing, expanded medians and shorter pedestrian crossings calm traffic and improve conditions for all road users. The proposed protected bicycle lanes and pedestrian safety improvements on Willow Ave, E 132nd St, E 133rd St and St Ann’s Ave establish safe, visible routes for cyclists and pedestrians between Mott Haven and the recently opened Randall’s Island Connector, greatly improving access to the recreational and natural resources of Randall’s Island Park.

Bruckner Boulevard & East 138th Street, Randall’s Island Connection Pedestrian & Bicycle Safety Improvements - presented to Bronx Community Board 1 in June 2016 (pdf)

Castle Hill Avenue Corridor Safety Improvements

Major Transportation Projects

Castle Hill Avenue was a Vision Zero Priority Corridor with 7.9 Pedestrian Killed or Severely Injured (KSI) crashes per mile. The proposal calmed the corridor between East Tremont Avenue and Westchester Avenue, and between Bruckner Expressway and Hart Street, and added 1 pedestrian island, 1 curb extension, and 1 refuge expansion which provides safer pedestrian crossings, creates simpler, safer left turns from cross streets, and reduces motor vehicle and pedestrian conflict. Bike lanes were also proposed.

Castle Hill Ave Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Bronx Community Board 9 in February 2016 (pdf)

Eames Place Enhanced Crossings

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

Following a pedestrian fatality in 2014, NYC DOT installed speed humps on Eames Pl and Webb Ave. To further improve the area, NYC DOT planned new enhanced crossings on Eames Pl and Webb Ave. The new marked crosswalks with accompanying pedestrian warning signs provide pedestrian access to the Jerome Public Library and PS 307, while making crossing pedestrians more visible to approaching vehicles.

Eames Place Enhanced Crossings - presented to Bronx Community Board 8 in March 2016 (pdf)

East Tremont Avenue, Hutchinson Parkway to Bruckner Boulevard

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to community requests, a high number of injuries and fatalities, as well as building upon the completed 2014 and 2015 projects NYC DOT proposed to improve East Tremont from Ericson Pl to Bruckner Blvd. Improvements included shortening crossing distances and clarifying traffic patterns, and installing traffic calming markings along the entire corridor.

East Tremont Avenue, Hutchinson Parkway to Bruckner Boulevard - presented to Bronx Community Board 10 in May 2015 (pdf)

Kappock Street Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Following requests from the a local senior center, day school and additional members of the community to clarify Kappock St in the Bronx for pedestrians, NYC DOT proposed safety improvements. The improvements included new concrete pedestrian spaces, high-visibility crosswalks, additional parking and separating vehicular movements. The proposed improvements tightened the intersection, shortened pedestrian crossings and reduced turning vehicle conflicts.

Kappock St Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Bronx Community Board 8’s Transportation Committee in May 2016 (pdf)

Shakespeare Avenue Pedestrian Access Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT proposed pedestrian access improvements on Shakespeare Ave between Jerome Ave and Woodycrest Ave. The plan included new sidewalks and crosswalks around the Greenstreets triangle at Jerome Ave, curb extensions at Anderson Ave, a curb extension at Woodycrest Ave, and enhanced crossings at W168th St. The changes shortened existing crossings, providing safer pedestrian facilities and clarifying vehicular movements.

Shakespeare Avenue Pedestrian Access Improvements - presented to Bronx CB 4 Transportation Committee in March 2016 (pdf)

Tremont Avenue

Bicycle Route Projects

On January 20 and 21, NYC DOT presented the Tremont Avenue Corridor Safety Improvements project to Bronx Community Boards 5 and 6, respectively. The proposed safety improvements along this Vision Zero Corridor benefit all roadway users. The improvements included a more organized roadway by establishing a critical east-west bike route with the installation of bike lanes along most of the corridor, connecting the numerous north-south bike routes and parks in the Bronx, including the anticipated bike and pedestrian esplanade at Roberto Clemente State Park. Pedestrian safety improvements included enhanced intersection improvements, creating better accessibility and visibility for pedestrians with shorter crossing distances and new crosswalks. Through a key section of the corridor clear lane assignments, markings, and left turn lanes at Third Avenue assist traffic flow.

Tremont Avenue - presented to Bronx Community Board 6 in January 2016 (pdf) Tremont Avenue - presented to Bronx Community Board 5 in January 2016 (pdf)

West Mount Eden Avenue, Jerome Avenue to Macombs Road

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to community requests, NYC DOT proposed pedestrian and traffic congestion improvements on W Mt Eden Avenue between Jerome Avenue and Macombs Road. The proposal included converting W Mt Eden Ave to a one- way west bound road from Jerome Ave to Macombs Rd, building a concrete ADA compliant sidewalk on the north side of West Mount Eden from Inwood Ave to Macombs Rd, and installing two Enhanced Crossings at Inwood Ave and W Mt Eden Ave.

West Mount Eden Avenue, Jerome Avenue to Macombs Road - presented to Bronx Community Board 4 in May 2015 (pdf)

Brooklyn

Adams Street Southbound Service Road Queue Jump Signal

Better Buses

In order to address safety issues on Adams Street between Fulton Mall and Johnson Street, NYC DOT examined potential solutions to the complex three-lane merge that the B25, B38 (LTD), and B52 buses traveling south on Adams Street made from curbside stops in the service road to the southbound left turn bay at the Fulton Mall intersection. NYC DOT’s signal timing proposal to address this issue gave the service road a 10 second queue jump signal (leading green), allowing buses and general traffic in the service road to merge while main roadway traffic is held. NYC DOT believes this proposal results in safer bus operations, with only minimal effects on Adams Street southbound traffic.

Adams Street Southbound Service Road Queue Jump Signal - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 Transportation & Public Safety Committee in February 2016 (pdf)

Argyle, Rugby, & Beverley Roads Bicycle Route

Bicycle Route Projects

In response to a community-based request, NYC DOT proposed a network of bicycle routes that connects the neighborhoods within Brooklyn Community Board 14 to Prospect Park and the Parade Ground. The proposed plan included northbound and southbound bicycle lanes as well as eastbound and westbound shared lanes, which improved mobility options and increased access to recreational opportunities.

Argyle, Rugby, & Beverley Roads Bicycle Route - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 14 in March 2016 (pdf) Argyle, Rugby, & Beverley Roads Bicycle Route - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 14 in April 2015 (pdf) Argyle, Rugby, & Beverley Roads Bicycle Route - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 14 in December 2014 (pdf)

Atlantic Avenue & Flatbush Avenue Comprehensive Safety Plan

Project Planning

On August 3rd, 2016 NYC DOT presented a comprehensive plan and hosted a workshop regarding safety improvements in the area around the intersection of Atlantic Avenue and Flatbush Avenue. The presentation included plans to calm traffic, improve mobility and improve the quality of public space in the area. The workshop that followed provided community members the opportunity to work with NYC DOT staff directly to provide comments and propose solutions to the challenges faced in the area. 

Atlantic & Flatbush Avenue's Safety Plan - presented to the community in August 2016 (pdf)

Bond Street

Bicycle Route Projects

The proposed Bond Street project upgraded the existing shared lane between 3 Street and Douglass Street in Brooklyn to a green curb side bike lane. This design organizes traffic on the roadway and improves a safe and convenient cycling route connecting neighborhoods and destinations.

Bond Street - presented to Brooklyn CB 6 Transportation/Public Safety Committee in May 2016 (pdf)

Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning

Bicycle Route Projects

Beginning in summer of 2014, NYC DOT partnered with Brooklyn Community Board 4, Council Member Antonio Reynoso, Council Member Rafael Espinal, the NYC Department of City Planning and NYPD to gather information from residents of Bushwick regarding where they would like to expand the bicycle network. This community-based process included a series of workshops, outreach events, and an online survey to gather data from people living, working, and riding in Bushwick.

Following an open-data collection period, NYC DOT worked closely with the Community Board and a Steering Committee of local partners to develop a phased network plan that will be installed over several years.

For a full project description, timeline, and links to community bike resources, please visit the feedback portal at http://nycdotfeedbackportals.nyc/bushwick-bike-network.

Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning - presented to Brooklyn CB 4 Full Board in February 2016 (pdf) Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning - presented to Brooklyn CB 4 Environmental Protection/Transportation Committee in February 2016 (pdf) Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning - presented at the Bushwick Bicycle Workshop at Silent Barn March 2015 (pdf) View photos from the May 9, 2015 Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning Workshop Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning - presented at the 83rd Precinct Community Council Meeting in November 2014 (pdf) Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning - presented at the Bushwick Bicycle Workshop in February 2015 (pdf) View photos from the February 19, 2015 Bushwick Bicycle Network Community Planning Workshop

Clinton Avenue - Safety & Mobility Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT’s proposal for Clinton Ave aimed to create a family-friendly north-south protected bike route connecting the Fort Greene/Clinton Hill neighborhood to the Brooklyn Waterfront Greenway and bridges to Manhattan, and to establish the corridor as a street that serves the safety and mobility needs of all road users. On Vanderbilt Ave, the existing north-south bike route in the neighborhood, cyclists had to share the same lanes as cars, buses, and trucks—a design that did not adequately accommodate the nearly 2,000 cyclists who use the corridor daily. Between 2010 and 2014, 11 cyclists were severely injured along this stretch of roadway. Protected bike lanes provide a safer alternative that better serve the growing numbers of cyclists and encourage less-experienced cyclists to bike.

Given street width constraints in the neighborhood, protected lanes couldn't be installed without changing the street network. The proposed plan reconfigured Clinton Ave as a one-way northbound street north of Gates Ave, enabling installation of a two-way, parking protected bicycle lane along the east curb of the street. In addition, the proposal called for intersection safety improvements such as pedestrian safety islands and new loading zones to improve curb access along the corridor; a connection to bike lanes on Vanderbilt Ave south of Gates Ave; and potential new pedestrian crossings and left turns onto Atlantic Ave from Waverly Ave and St. James Pl. The proposal has minimal impact on traffic flow in the neighborhood as several other streets are able to accommodate the moderate southbound traffic on Clinton Ave.

Clinton Avenue - Safety & Mobility Improvements - presented to Brooklyn CB 2 Transportation Committee in May 2016 (pdf)

Fort Greene/Clinton Hill Vision Zero

Bicycle Route Projects, Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

On January 26th, 2016 NYC DOT attended a Town Hall hosted by Council Member Laurie Cumbo to discuss Vision Zero related projects and statistics in the Fort Greene and Clinton Hill neighborhoods of Brooklyn. The presentation included citywide statistics on the progress of Vision Zero and details on several projects that are planned for the area.

Fort Greene / Clinton Hill - presented in January 2016 (pdf)

Fourth Avenue & Atlantic Avenue – Rubber Island

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT installed a rubber pedestrian refuge island at the intersection of 4th Ave and Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn, creating a safer and shorter two-part crossing. The rubber product is a new tool that allowed NYC DOT to install a pedestrian refuge where concrete is not feasible due to conflicts with subway infrastructure and utilities underneath the roadway.

Fourth Avenue & Atlantic Avenue – Rubber Island - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 in January 2017 (pdf)

Guider Avenue at Coney Island Avenue Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to requests from Councilmember Deutsch and Community Boards 13 and 15, NYC DOT proposed safety improvements along Guider Avenue, Neptune Avenue, and Coney Island Avenue. Congestion and conflicting vehicle movements, as well as pedestrian safety and access were addressed at the intersection of Coney Island Avenue and Guider Avenue. Clarified traffic movement, pedestrian safety, greening and additional parking were addressed along the Guider Avenue corridor. Congestion was also addressed along Neptune Avenue between Coney Island Avenue and E 12th Street.

Guider Avenue at Coney Island Avenue Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn CB's 13 and 15 Transportation Committees in July 2015 (pdf) Guider Avenue at Coney Island Avenue Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn CB's 13 and 15 Transportation Committees in June 2015 (pdf)

Jamaica Avenue - Jackie Robinson Parkway Intersection Safety & Mobility Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT proposed safety and mobility improvements for the intersection of Jamaica Avenue, Pennsylvania Avenue, Bushwick Avenue, and the Jackie Robinson Parkway. Proposed improvements included installing new crosswalks and pedestrian signals to accommodate pedestrian desire lines; shortened pedestrian crossing distances on Jamaica Avenue; improved traffic flow on Pennsylvania Avenue, Jamaica Avenue and southbound Jackie Robinson Parkway; simplified traffic signal display for northbound Pennsylvania Avenue; and added parking on Jamaica Avenue. This proposal created safer pedestrian crossings and safer conditions for motor vehicle operators and improved traffic flow at this complicated, busy intersection.

Jamaica Ave - Jackie Robinson Pkwy Intersection Safety & Mobility Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 5 Transportation Committee in April 2016 (pdf)

Jay Street, Schermerhorn Street to Sands Street Parking Protected Bicycle Lanes

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed safety improvements between Fulton Street and Sands Street, including Smith St between Schermerhorn Street and Fulton Street. The proposal included upgrading the existing bicycle lanes to parking protected bike lanes and installing painted pedestrian islands at four locations. In addition, the project included improving pedestrian access, circulation and safety to and from the Manhattan Bridge by adding a new crosswalk at the off-ramp and creating a continuous connection from the east sidewalk. The initial presentation was complemented by more detail on a new crosswalk at the Manhattan Bridge off-ramp onto Jay Street and the lanes on Smith Street south of Fulton Mall.

Jay Street, Schermerhorn Street to Sands Street Parking Protected Bicycle Lanes - presented to Brooklyn CB 2 Transportation Committee in June 2016 (pdf) Jay Street, Schermerhorn Street to Sands Street Parking Protected Bicycle Lanes - presented to Brooklyn CB 2 Transportation Committee in March 2016 (pdf)

Lafayette Avenue Buffered Bicycle Lane & Traffic Calming

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to upgrade the existing shared bike lane on Lafayette Ave between Fulton St and Classon Ave to a buffered bike lane to improve safety and reduce stressful cycling conditions. To address excess street capacity leading to speeding the project consisted of the removal of one of the two existing moving lanes. The parking lane and bus stops on the south side of Lafayette Ave were widened to improve bus mobility and access to vehicles. Changes to signal timing on Lafayette Ave maintain vehicle mobility. A curb extension at Cumberland Street was installed to reduce crossing distances and improve accessibility at a location where a street tree prevents the passage of wheelchairs or strollers.

Lafayette Avenue Buffered Bicycle Lane & Traffic Calming - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 in March 2017 (pdf) Lafayette Avenue Buffered Bicycle Lane & Traffic Calming - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 in January 2016 (pdf)

Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT proposed a set of safety improvements on Linden Blvd between Kings Hwy and Avenue D in Brooklyn. The corridor ranked in the top 10% of Brooklyn corridors by KSI (killed or severely injured) crashes per mile among pedestrians, bicyclists and motor vehicle occupants. Since 2009, there have been five traffic fatalities on the corridor. The proposal included upgraded markings and signage, new dedicated left turn phases, numerous concrete curb and median tip extensions, and improved bus stop facilities. The proposal allows shorter safer pedestrian crossings, safer left and right turns, discourages speeding and better defines the roadway, and gives transit riders a safer place to wait.

Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 18 in June 2015 (pdf) Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 16 in June 2015 (pdf) Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 17 in June 2015 (pdf) Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements - presented at a Safety Workshop on February 05 and 12, 2015 (pdf) Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements - presented on February 05 and 12, 2015 (pdf) Visit the Linden Boulevard Corridor Safety Improvements Feedback Portal

Linden Boulevard, Van Sinderen Avenue to 78th Street Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT proposed a set of safety improvements on 2.4 miles of Linden Boulevard between Van Sinderen Avenue and 78 Street in Brooklyn. The corridor ranked in the top 10% of Brooklyn corridors by KSI (persons killed or severely injured) per mile among pedestrians, bicyclists, and motor vehicle occupants. Since 2009, there had been four traffic fatalities on this portion of the corridor. The proposal included upgraded markings and signage, new dedicated left turn phases, and numerous concrete median improvements. The proposal intended to create shorter and safer pedestrian crossings, safer left turns, discourage speeding, and better define the roadway.

Linden Blvd, Van Sinderen Ave to 78th St Corridor Safety Improvement - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 5 in March 2016 (pdf)

Marine Park Connector to Jamaica Bay Greenway

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to improve access to the Jamaica Bay Greenway entrance on Flatbush Ave by installing a parking protected 2-way bicycle path along the edge of Marine Park, from Ave U and 38th St to Hendrickson Pl and Flatbush Ave. The installation of a high quality recreational path provides a safe, separated facility for Jamaica Bay Greenway users and improves the edge condition along Marine Park. As part of the project, NYC DOT proposed to remove underused metered parking on Hendrickson Pl, and mark vehicle lanes at a standard width throughout the project to discourage speeding on residential streets. The project also intended to increase safety at the bike and pedestrian crossings at Shore Pkwy with signage, crossing markings and ADA accessible ramps. NYC DOT will return to the CB with detailed proposals for improvements to the greenway path condition along Flatbush Ave, from Hendrickson Pl to Shore Pkwy.

Marine Park Connector to Jamaica Bay Greenway - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 18 in 2016 (pdf)

Meeker Avenue Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to requests from Community Board 1, Assemblyman Lentol, Council Member Levin and Council Member Reynoso, NYC DOT proposed safety improvements to address gaps in the pedestrian network on Meeker Avenue from Union to Metropolitan Avenues and safety concerns at the intersections along Metropolitan Avenue between Union Avenue and Havemeyer Street. Improvements included signal timing changes, new crosswalks, sidewalk extensions and clarified vehicular movements.

Meeker Avenue Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 1 in January 2016 (pdf)

Metropolitan Avenue - Bicycle Route

Bicycle Route Projects

The proposed Metropolitan Avenue project provides a crucial link in NYC’s bicycle network, connecting neighborhood bicycle lanes in Queens to the existing Grand Street bicycle lane in Brooklyn. This project consisted of a mix of shared lanes and bicycle lanes, as well as other geometric improvements that resulted in greater organization of traffic and increased safety for all road users.

Metropolitan Avenue - Bicycle Route - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 1 in September 2016 (pdf) Metropolitan Avenue - Bicycle Route - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 1 in June 2016 (pdf) Metropolitan Avenue - Bicycle Route - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 1 in May 2015 (pdf)

Ocean Avenue & Parkside Avenue Pedestrian & Traffic Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT proposed pedestrian and traffic safety improvements at the intersection of Ocean Avenue and Parkside Avenue, at the southeast corner of Prospect Park. The plan followed earlier improvements in 2012 that tightened the intersection and significantly reduced motor vehicle occupant injuries but had not reduced pedestrian injuries. The plan included installing a pedestrian island in the north crosswalk, and banning the southbound and westbound left turns at the intersection. This provided a safer, shorter crossing between the Parkside Ave subway station and Prospect Park, encouraging drivers to turn more carefully, simplifying movements and reducing conflicts between turning vehicles and pedestrians in the intersection.

Ocean Avenue & Parkside Avenue Pedestrian & Traffic Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 9 in June 2015 (pdf)

Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

In response to community requests for bicycle and pedestrian improvements on the Pulaski Bridge, NYC DOT proposed building a new bicycle path on the bridge adjacent to the existing shared path. The design included a new barrier to protect bicyclists from motor vehicles. This proposed path doubled the space on the bridge dedicated to bicyclists and pedestrians, enhanced safety by separating those two modes and improved access to Long Island City subway stations for Brooklyn residents.

Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements - presented in December 2014 (pdf) Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements - presented in December 2013 (pdf)

Saint John’s Place/Sterling Place Safety Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed safety improvements on Saint John’s Place and Sterling Place in Brooklyn. The proposal included the addition of new bicycle connections, and improved markings intended to reduce speeding and create standard lane widths. The proposal also included intersection improvements on Saint John’s Place at Utica Avenue, Eastern Parkway and East New York Avenue.

St. Johns Pl/Sterling Pl Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 8 Transportation Committee in February 2016 (pdf) St. Johns Pl/Sterling Pl Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 8 in January 2016 (pdf) St. Johns Pl/Sterling Pl Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 16 in January 2016 (pdf)

Sheepshead Bay Road Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT proposed corridor safety improvements for both Sheepshead Bay Rd and Ave Z between E13th and Jerome. The proposal included a one way conversion for two blocks of Sheepshead Bay Rd to improve circulation and congestion, pedestrian safety islands, bus route changes to improve on time service, and an upgraded markings plan.

Sheepshead Bay Road Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 15 in June 2015 (pdf)

Surf Avenue & Stillwell Avenue Intersection Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT proposed pedestrian and traffic safety improvements at the intersection of Surf Avenue and Stillwell Avenue in Coney Island. The proposal included painted curb extensions on three corners that increased pedestrian space, shortened crossing distances, and calmed traffic. These curb extensions, in addition to new markings and turn bays, re-aligned Stillwell Avenue to improve traffic flow and safety. Between Surf Avenue and the Boardwalk along Stillwell Avenue, parking was moved to the curbsides to increase parking supply while calming traffic. The eastbound B36 bus stop was moved closer to the intersection to encourage bus users to use the crosswalk and deter midblock crossings. A drop off and pick up zone was created on the northeast corner to alleviate double parking.

Surf Avenue & Stillwell Avenue Intersection Safety Improvements - presented to Community Board 13 in March 2015 (pdf) Surf Avenue & Stillwell Avenue Intersection Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 13 in February 2015 (pdf)

Van Siclen Avenue / Pennsylvania Avenue Bike Lanes

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to improve access to the Jamaica Bay Greenway entrance on Pennsylvania Ave by installing a barrier protected two-way bicycle path along the west side of the avenue south of Seaview Ave approaching the Belt Parkway, installing signs and markings at the westbound parkway entrance, and installing bicycle stamps on the west sidewalk of the overpass to the eastbound parkway entrance. As part of the project, NYC DOT proposed to install bicycle lanes on Van Siclen Ave and Seaview Ave, which connect to the existing bicycle network.

Van Siclen Avenue / Pennsylvania Avenue Bike Lanes - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 5 in March 2016 (pdf)

Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

Three pedestrian fatalities since 2009 occurred at this complicated six-leg intersection on the border of Brooklyn and Queens, at the bustling Myrtle/Wyckoff transportation hub. In 2014, DOT implemented five turn bans which have seen low compliance. New Vision Zero safety funding presented the opportunity to further simplify the intersection. The project proposed to convert Wyckoff Avenue between Gates and Myrtle into a pedestrian plaza, which allows pedestrians to make subway to bus connections without crossing the street and creates a central neighborhood public space where the Myrtle Ave and Wyckoff Ave retail corridors intersect. Additionally, converting the Palmetto Street to bus only on both sides of the intersection, and Wyckoff Avenue to southbound-only to Putnam Ave lowers the number of turns in the intersection from over twenty to eight. NYC DOT held workshops on 3/29/16 in Ridgewood, Queens (IS77), and 4/27/16 in Bushwick, Brooklyn (Bushwick School for Social Justice), as well as a one-day plaza on Saturday 4/30/2016 from 10AM-6PM.

Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 5 Transportation Committee in June 2016 (pdf) Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 4 in June 2016 (pdf) Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 5 Transportation Committee in May 2016 (pdf) Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented in March 2016 (pdf)

Manhattan

8th Street Bicycle Lane

Bicycle Route Projects

With the impending resurfacing of 8th Street and the soon to be completed Astor Place Reconstruction, NYC DOT proposed a dedicated bike lane on 8th Street from 6th Avenue to Lafayette Street. Building off the success of the pedestrian safety project implemented in 2015 while also providing a critical connection from Hudson Street to Astor Place. Furthermore, a dedicated bike lane on 8th Street complimented recent bicycle network improvements in the community and improved access to Citi Bike and the Subway.

8th Street Bicycle Lane - presented to Manhattan Community Board 2 in September 2016 (pdf)

Amsterdam Avenue Northbound Bike Route

Bicycle Route Projects

Following a feasibility study requested by Manhattan Community Board 7 to identify a northbound bicycle route for the Upper West Side, NYC DOT proposed to install a parking-protected bicycle lane on Amsterdam Avenue between West 72nd and West 110th to improve safety for all road users along the corridor. Improvements included a "floating" parking lane, concrete pedestrian refuge islands, updated parking regulations, leading pedestrian and bicycle signal phases and dedicated left-turn treatments. These improvements combined shortened crossing distances, organized traffic, and improved bicycle safety. Additional options were studied as part of the request however Amsterdam emerged as the preferred option.

Amsterdam Avenue Northbound Bike Route - presented to Manhattan Community Board 7 in February 2016 (pdf) Amsterdam Avenue Northbound Bike Route - presented to Manhattan Community Board 7 in January 2016 (pdf) Amsterdam Avenue Northbound Bike Route - presented to Manhattan Community Board 7 in November 2015 (pdf)

Astor Place–Cooper Square Improvements

Capital Projects

Astor Place and Cooper Square serve as the gateway to the East Village and have a high level of pedestrian traffic due to the presence of a number of important institutions and transportation connections. This project improves pedestrian mobility and community quality of life. The project brought a number of improvements to the street network and created large areas of pedestrian space. Traffic was realigned along Fourth Avenue creating additional open space adjacent to Peter Cooper Park, the pedestrian island housing the northbound 6 train was roughly doubled in size, and Astor Place between Lafayette Street and Fourth Avenue was pedestrianized. In an effort to increase safety and shorten crossing distances, medians were constructed in the center of Third Avenue between 4th and 9th Streets.

Broadway, 135th Street to 153rd Street Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT studied corridor safety conditions on Broadway, between 135th and 153rd Sts, in the Hamilton Heights neighborhood of Manhattan. Broadway was identified as a Priority Corridor in the Vision Zero Manhattan Pedestrian Safety Action Plan. The preliminary proposal included creating two lanes in each direction with turn bays, a wide parking lane, and expanded pedestrian space in the center medians. New markings and signage created simpler, safer left turns. Additionally, NYC DOT will continue to work with the community to identify locations for commercial loading zones and to identify select locations where turn restrictions will improve safety.

Broadway, 135th Street to 153rd Street Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 9 November 2015 (pdf) Broadway, 135th Street to 153rd Street Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 9 in October 2015 (pdf) Broadway, 135th Street to 153rd Street Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 9 in July 2015 (pdf) Broadway, 135th Street to 153rd Street Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 9 in June 2015 (pdf) Broadway, 135th Street to 153rd Street Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 9 in May 2015 (pdf)

Chrystie Street Two-way Protected Bicycle Lane

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to upgrade the existing bicycle lanes on Chrystie St between Canal St and Houston St to a two-way protected bicycle lane along the east curb to improve safety and reduce stressful cycling conditions. The two-way lane is protected from traffic by jersey barriers, delineators, and parked vehicles. Existing travel lanes on Chrystie St were retained and signals were retimed at the intersections with Houston St, Delancey St, and Grand St to maintain mobility. The proposal also included four additional pedestrian safety islands to shorten crossing distances on Chrystie St and 2nd Ave.

Chrystie Street Two-way Protected Bicycle Lane - presented to Manhattan Community Board 3 in March 2016 (pdf)

Division Street, Market Street to Bowery Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to community requests, NYC DOT proposed pedestrian safety improvements along Division Street between Market Street and the Bowery. The proposal included installing a pedestrian plaza and new markings to provide additional pedestrian space, calm traffic, and deter double parking. In addition, the corner of Division Street, Bowery, and Catherine Street were rebuilt and expanded, improving sidewalk and roadway conditions while increasing pedestrian space. Additional channelization along Bowery north of Division Street was also installed to calm and rationalize traffic.

Division Street, Market Street to Bowery Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 3 in November 2015(pdf)

East River Greenway – Traffic Calming & Protected Bike Lanes

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed safety improvements for FDR Service Rd between E 25th St and E 34th St. The project sought to upgrade the existing bicycle facility along Manhattan’s East River Greenway, improvements included physically separating moving traffic and bicycles, and clarifying wayfinding to provide a stronger, safer connection along the waterfront.

East River Greenway – Traffic Calming & Protected Bike Lanes - presented to Manhattan Community Board 6 in November 2016 (pdf)

First Avenue & East 124th Street – Bicycle & Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed safety improvements to 1st Ave between E 124th St and E 125th St and to E 124th St between 1st Ave and 2nd Ave in Manhattan. The proposed improvements included 2-way protected bike lanes and a midblock enhanced pedestrian crossing with a concrete pedestrian island. The project improved bicycle network connectivity near the Willis Ave and RFK Bridges and improved pedestrian safety and access to Mayor Wagner Pool and Othmar Ammann Playground.

First Avenue & East 124th Street – Bicycle & Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 11 in February 2016 (pdf)

Lincoln Square Bow Tie Pedestrian Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT held a public workshop to determine community needs and solicit specific input regarding pedestrian safety improvements in the Lincoln Square Bow Tie Area on June 4, 2014. At the request of the community board and local officials, the workshop provided community members the opportunity to sit with NYC DOT staff and comment on the local needs and potential improvements that should be explored in the Bow Tie area – roughly from W. 66th St to W. 62nd St on Broadway and Columbus Ave. The information gathered at this meeting was directly used to develop pedestrian safety improvements which were presented to the local community board in December 2014.

In February 2015, NYC DOT presented final recommendations to Community Board 7, incorporating feedback received from the December 2014 meeting.

In early December 2014, NYC DOT presented their recommendations to Community Board 7 as well as many attendees who were present at the initial workshop. The proposal included solutions to many of the issues identified at the June workshop. NYC DOT continued to refine this proposal and returned in early 2015 with a final set of recommendations.

Lincoln Square Bow Tie Pedestrian Improvements - presented to Manhattan CB 7 Transportation Committee in February 2015 (pdf) Lincoln Square Bow Tie Pedestrian Improvements - presented to Manhattan CB 7 Transportation Committee in December 2014 (pdf) Lincoln Square Bow Tie Pedestrian Improvements - presented to Manhattan CB 7 Transportation Committee in June 2014 (pdf)

Lincoln Square Safety Improvement Study

Complete Streets

NYC DOT presented to Community Board 7 Traffic and Transportation Committee on June 14, 2016 a proposal for pedestrian safety enhancements and traffic direction changes in the Lincoln Square area. The proposal impacted the direction of traffic on West 60th Street (West End to Columbus), 62nd Street (Amsterdam to Columbus) and 64th Street (West End to Amsterdam).

Lincoln Square Safety Improvement Study - presented to Manhattan Community Board 7 Transportation Committee in June 2016 (pdf)

Madison Avenue at 96th Street Traffic, Bus, & Safety Improvements

Better Buses

In response to community concerns about traffic and pedestrian safety, and a request from the MTA to improve street conditions for the M96 bus, this project proposed traffic, bus, and safety improvements at Madison Avenue and E 96th Street and surrounding intersections. The project area included E 96 Street and E 97 Street from 5th Avenue to Madison Avenue, specifically looking at traffic, bus, and safety concerns associated with crosstown traffic traveling to and from Central Park. The project proposal included ten neckdowns, a pedestrian island, curb regulation changes to improve traffic and bus movements to and from the park, and traffic signal changes to better coordinate crosstown travel.

Madison Avenue at 96th Street Traffic, Bus, & Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 Transportation Committee in April 2016 (pdf) Madison Avenue at 96th Street Traffic, Bus, & Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 11 Transportation Committee in March 2016 (pdf)

Manhattan Bridge Mobility & Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

After requests from the community for pedestrian safety enhancements around the mouth of the Manhattan Bridge, NYC DOT proposed to convert the Lower Roadway of the Bridge to Manhattan-bound at all times, eliminating daily reversals. This traffic pattern change allowed for significant pedestrian improvements, including expanded pedestrian space, shorter crossings, new crosswalks and signal infrastructure, and improved traffic alignments while maintaining current traffic capacities. The location was a Vision Zero Priority intersection and ranked in the top 10% for most dangerous intersections in the borough. The project improves safety for all users.

Manhattan Bridge Mobility & Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 2 in May 2015(pdf) Manhattan Bridge Mobility & Safety Improvements - presented to Manhattan Community Board 3 in May 2015 (pdf)

Second Avenue, East 59th Street to East 105th Street Protected Bike Lane

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to install a parking-protected bicycle lane on 2nd Avenue between East 105th St and East 68th St to improve safety for all road users along the corridor. Improvements included a "floating" parking lane, concrete pedestrian refuge islands, updated parking regulations, leading pedestrian and bicycle signal phases and dedicated left-turn treatments. These improvements combined shortened crossing distances, organized traffic, and improved bicycle safety. From East 68th St to E 59th St NYC DOT proposed to install an enhanced shared lane, which concentrates bicycle traffic on the left side of the street.

2nd Avenue, E 59th St to E 105th St Protected Bike Lane - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 in January 2016 (pdf)

Second Avenue, East 59th Street to East 43rd Street Protected Bike Lane

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to upgrade the enhanced shared lane on 2nd Avenue between E 59th St and E 52nd St in Midtown Manhattan to parking protected bike lanes. This proposal connects to the Queensboro Bridge connection at 59th St. The proposed project involved installing a parking protected bike lane with left turn lanes in the corridor that had an enhanced shared lane, as well as installing pedestrian safety islands at intersections. In addition, NYC DOT upgraded the enhanced shared lane between E 52nd St and E 43rd St to a curbside bike lane. Parking is allowed on this part of 2nd Avenue at off peak times. The project also included painted curb extensions, provides simpler, safer left turns, and improves safety for all road users.

Second Avenue, East 59th Street to East 43rd Street Protected Bike Lane - presented to Manhattan Community Board 6 in July 2016 (pdf)

Sixth Avenue, West 8th Street – West 33rd Street – Parking Protected Bike Lane & Traffic Calming

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed to upgrade the existing bike lane on 6th Ave between W 8th St and W 33rd St to a parking protected bike lane to improve safety for all road users. Pedestrian safety islands shortened crossing distances across 6th Ave from 66 to 49 feet. Mixing zones and turn lanes improve safety at intersections with left turns while maintaining the existing number of moving lanes.

6th Avenue, W 8th St – W 33rd St – Parking Protected Bike Lane & Traffic Calming - presented to Manhattan Community Board 2 in January 2016 (pdf) 6th Avenue, W 8th St – W 33rd St – Parking Protected Bike Lane & Traffic Calming - presented to the Manhattan Community Board 4 in November 2015 (pdf)

Third Avenue, East 60th Street to East 72nd Street; East 66th Street - Second Avenue & Third Avenue

Complete Streets

In an effort to address pedestrian safety issues along Vision Zero Priority Corridors, NYC DOT planned to implement improvements on 3rd Ave and 2nd Ave in the Upper East Side. The proposal included turn-only lanes, neckdowns, reconfigured crosswalks, and median tip extensions at intersections that had high pedestrian injury rates. These changes reduced crossing distances, clarifying vehicular movements, and expanding pedestrian space.

3rd Ave, E 60th St to E 72nd St; 66th St - 2nd Ave & 3rd Ave - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 in October 2015 (pdf)

Union Square Bike Network Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

Building off the extensive bicycle network around Union Square, this project filled in a critical north-south gap in the network. It connected 4th Avenue to the Square and onto the planned protected path on Sixth Avenue. It also added two east-west connections on the east side of the park that provide a new route between protected lanes on First and Second Avenues and Union Square. Project specifics included: a two way protected path along the eastern and northern sides of Union Square, the extension of the existing protected lane on 4th Avenue to 14th Street, and three dedicated bike lanes on 15th, 16th and 17th Streets.

Union Square Bike Network Improvements - presented to Manhattan CB 5 Transportation Committee in May 2016 (pdf)

Upper East Side Crosstown Bike Routes

Bicycle Route Projects

In response to Manhattan Community Board 8’s request to study crosstown routes in the Upper East Side on February 3, NYC DOT proposed crosstown bike routes on E 85th/84th St, E 78th/77th St, and E 68th/E 67th St. These crosstown routes helped filled in an existing gap in the bicycle network without removing any vehicle travel lanes or parking. They provide clear connections from Central Park and the Manhattan Waterfront Greenway, while also linking subway stations to other neighborhood destinations such as Hunter College and the commercial corridor on E 86th Street. Furthermore the crosstown routes reinforced the recently expanded CitiBike within Community Board 8. We reviewed the community’s concerns about the current proposed routes for crosstown UES bike lanes and returned in March to the Board with additional information.

In May, we returned to the Transportation Committee with alternative routes that were based on recommendations given to us by the public; these were East 82nd and 81st Street, East 76th and 75th Streets, and East 71st and 70th Streets.

In July 2018, in response to a request from Council Member Kallos, NYC DOT presented two additional pairs of crosstown bike routes on the Upper East Side, on East 65th, 66th, 84th and 85th Streets.

Upper East Side Crosstown Bike Routes - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 in July 2018 (pdf) Upper East Side Crosstown Bike Routes - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 in May 2016 (pdf) Upper East Side Crosstown Bike Routes - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 in March 2016 (pdf) Upper East Side Crosstown Bike Routes - presented to Manhattan Community Board 8 in February 2016 (pdf)

Queens

138th Street & 31st Road Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

Following community requests, NYC DOT planned pedestrian safety improvements at the intersection of 138th St and 31st Rd. The plan included a new enhanced crossing, upgrading crosswalks to high-visibility, a concrete pedestrian refuge triangle and additional traffic calming. The proposed improvements expanded the pedestrian network, slowing vehicle speeds, and making crossing pedestrians more visible to approaching vehicles.

138th Street & 31st Road Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 7 Transportation Committee in January 2016 (pdf)

31st Avenue Bike Route & Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

The proposed bicycle route on 31st Ave, 32nd Ave, 74th St, 75th St, 100th St, 101st St, and 27th Ave expanded the bicycle network in northern Queens while connecting to existing bike facilities, including the Queens Waterfront Greenway on Vernon Blvd and the Flushing Bay Promenade. The proposal included a mix of bike lanes and shared lanes, and pedestrian safety improvements at targeted locations. The changes proposed organized the roadway, improving safety for all users.

31st Avenue Bike Route & Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 1 in June 2016 (pdf) 31st Avenue Bike Route & Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented Presented to Queens Community Board 3 and CB 3’s TC in April & June 2016 (pdf) 31st Avenue Bike Route & Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 1 Transportation Committee in March 2016 (pdf)

77th Avenue at 81st Street Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to a request from the Community Board, NYC DOT proposed to add two stop signs on 77th Ave at 81st St and to reverse 81st St between 78th Ave and 77th Ave. The crosswalks for the intersection were reconfigured to provide more direct and safer pedestrian access to the staircase for pedestrians using the 80th St overpass.

77th Ave at 81st St Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 5 Transportation Committee in February 2016 (pdf)

Astoria Boulevard, East Elmhurst Pedestrian Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

In response to community requests for pedestrian improvements, NYC DOT proposed concrete, signal and marking improvements to Astoria Blvd from 77th St to Ditmars Blvd. The improvements included enhanced medians, upgraded markings, clearer intersection geometry, parking regulation changes and new left turn bay. Astoria Blvd is in a Vision Zero Priority Area and the proposal provided safer opportunities to cross, calming the corridor and increasing access to the surrounding neighborhoods.

Astoria Blvd-East Elmhurst Pedestrian Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 3 in February 2016 (pdf) Astoria Blvd-East Elmhurst Pedestrian Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 3 Transportation Committee in January 2016 (pdf) Astoria Blvd-East Elmhurst Pedestrian Improvements - presented to the East Elmhurst Civic Association in November 2015 (pdf)

Astoria Park Study Area Safety Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

In response to requests from Council Member Constantinides and Assembly member Simotas, NYC DOT studied the streets around Astoria Park for safety improvements. At the request of Council Member Constantinides, NYC DOT attended the Astoria Park Planning Session and presented examples of safety improvements used in other parts of the city and facilitated small group discussions about issues and opportunities around Astoria Park. Ideas generated at the meeting will inform future improvements.

Astoria Park Study Area Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 1 Full Board in February 2016 (pdf)

Bowne Park & Francis Lewis Park Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT studied the areas around Bowne Park and Francis Lewis Park to see how pedestrian access to the parks could be improved. To slow speeds around Bowne Park, four new speed humps were approved by NYC DOT. NYC DOT also planned to increase pedestrian access to Francis Lewis Park by adding new enhanced crossings, and to calm traffic by and marking parking lane stripes on 3rd Ave adjacent to the park.

Bowne Park & Francis Lewis Park Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB7 Transportation Committee in January 2016 (pdf)

Broadway, 41st Avenue to Baxter Avenue Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT proposed pedestrian safety improvements on both Broadway and 41st Ave between 76th St and Baxter Ave in response to community concerns regarding safety on the streets surrounding Elmhurst Hospital. The proposed changes improved pedestrian crossings, calming traffic and clarifying vehicular movements.

Broadway, 41st Avenue to Baxter Avenue Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 4 in March 2016 (pdf) Broadway, 41st Avenue to Baxter Avenue Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 4 Transportation Committee in February 2016 (pdf)

Hillside & Metropolitan Pedestrian Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT proposed pedestrian safety improvements to the complicated intersections of Hillside Avenue with Metropolitan Avenue and with Kew Gardens Road. The pedestrian safety improvements included concrete sidewalk extensions, shorter and safer pedestrian crossings, an improved traffic network with more efficient signal timing, turn restrictions to improve traffic flow, and the elimination of dangerous pedestrian and vehicle conflicts at the intersection of Hillside and Metropolitan Avenues. This proposal enhances pedestrian safety and mobility while improving traffic flow through the complex intersections along Hillside Avenue.

Hillside & Metropolitan Pedestrian Safety Improvements - Project Update - presented to Queens Community Board 9 in February 2016 (pdf) Hillside & Metropolitan Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 9 Transportation Committee in May 2014 (pdf) Hillside & Metropolitan Pedestrian Safety Improvements - presented in September 2014 (pdf)

Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

In response to community requests for bicycle and pedestrian improvements on the Pulaski Bridge, NYC DOT proposed building a new bicycle path on the bridge adjacent to the existing shared path. The design included a new barrier to protect bicyclists from motor vehicles. This proposed path doubled the space on the bridge dedicated to bicyclists and pedestrians, enhanced safety by separating those two modes and improved access to Long Island City subway stations for Brooklyn residents.

Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements - presented in December 2014 (pdf) Pulaski Bridge Pedestrian & Bicycle Improvements - presented in December 2013 (pdf)

Q47 Bus Route Changes

At the request of Queens Borough President Melinda Katz, Assembly Member Michael Dendekker and Councilmember Costa Constantinides, along with the community requests, we conducted a feasibility study of converting 77th Street from 25th Avenue to 30th Avenue from a two-way operation into a one-way operation. This request emanated from the safety concerns and congestion due to the narrowness of 77th Street. 77th Street operated as a two-way street with parking on both sides and also as a bus route for the Q47 operated by MTA Bus Company. The narrowness of the street did not allow for the safe passage of buses or other vehicles and resulted in congestion, delays and other negative effects upon the residents of the block. NYC DOT conducted a joint study with the MTA Bus Company and based on the results, recommended that 77th Street be converted into a one-way northbound street for one block from 30th Avenue to 25th Avenue.

Q47 Bus Route Changes - presented to Queens Community Board 3 in January 2016 (pdf) Q47 Bus Route Changes - presented to Queens Community Board 3 in October 2015 (pdf)

Queens Boulevard, 74th Street to Eliot Avenue Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

NYC DOT proposed robust safety improvements on Queens Boulevard between 74th St and Eliot Ave. The plan included protected bicycle lanes, increased pedestrian space and specific safety improvements at intersections, with anticipated implementation in Summer 2016. This project continued the work NYC DOT installed between Roosevelt Ave and 73rd St in 2015 and also laid the groundwork for a $100 million capital investment on Queens Boulevard, a Vision Zero Priority Corridor, as part of the de Blasio Administration’s Great Streets initiative.

Queens Boulevard, 74th Street to Eliot Avenue Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 4 in May 2016 (pdf) Queens Boulevard, 74th Street to Eliot Avenue Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 4 Transportation Committee in March 2016 (pdf)

Queens Community Board 5 Bicycle Network Connections

Bicycle Route Projects

The proposed Bicycle Network Connections on Cornelia Street, Hancock Street, and Catalpa Avenue provided a crucial link in NYC’s bicycle network, connecting the neighborhood bike network in Ridgewood, Queens to the developing bike network in Bushwick, Brooklyn. This project consisted primarily of bicycle lanes, that resulted in greater organization of traffic and increased safety for all road users. 

Queens Community Board 5 Bicycle Network Connections - presented to Queens CB 5 Transportation Committee in April 2016 (pdf)

Queens Community Board 5 – Phase 3

Bicycle Route Projects

As part of the third phase of a community-planning initiative, NYC DOT worked with the community to expand the bicycle network in Queens Community Board 5 on 69th Street, 80th Street, and Juniper Boulevard North. These routes increased mobility options for cyclists, provided access to recreational opportunities, and improved safety for all road users.

Queens Community Board 5 – Phase 3 - presented to Queens Community Board 5 in September 2015 (pdf)

Rockaway Beach Boulevard & Beach 62nd Street Pedestrian Accessibility & Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

NYC DOT proposed safety improvements on Rockaway Beach Blvd between Beach 62nd St and Beach 59th St. Improvements included marking high-visibility crosswalks, building concrete pedestrian safety islands and activating a traffic signal at Beach 62nd Street. The proposed improvements increased area accessibility, and provided safer and shorter pedestrian crossings.

Rockaway Beach Blvd & Beach 62nd Street Pedestrian Accessibility & Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 14 in March 2016 (pdf)

Rockaway Boulevard, 89th Street to 102nd Road Pedestrian Accessibility & Safety Improvements

Pedestrian Mobility and Safety

Following a fatality in 2014, NYC DOT proposed safety improvements on Rockaway Blvd between 89th St and 102nd Rd. Improvements included marking new high-visibility crosswalks and building concrete pedestrian safety islands. The proposed improvements increased accessibility, and provided safer and shorter pedestrian crossings.

Rockaway Blvd - 89th St to 102nd Rd Pedestrian Accessibility & Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 9 in March 2016 (pdf) Rockaway Blvd - 89th St to 102nd Rd Pedestrian Accessibility & Safety Improvements - presented to Queens Community Board 9 Transportation Committee in February 2016 (pdf)

Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements

Complete Streets

Three pedestrian fatalities since 2009 occurred at this complicated six-leg intersection on the border of Brooklyn and Queens, at the bustling Myrtle/Wyckoff transportation hub. In 2014, NYC DOT implemented five turn bans which have seen low compliance. New Vision Zero safety funding presented the opportunity to further simplify the intersection. The project proposed to convert Wyckoff Avenue between Gates and Myrtle into a pedestrian plaza, which allows pedestrians to make subway to bus connections without crossing the street and creates a central neighborhood public space where the Myrtle Ave and Wyckoff Ave retail corridors intersect. Additionally, converting the Palmetto Street to bus only on both sides of the intersection, and Wyckoff Avenue to southbound-only to Putnam Ave lowered the number of turns in the intersection from over twenty to eight. NYC DOT held workshops on 3/29/16 in Ridgewood, Queens (IS77), and 4/27/16 in Bushwick, Brooklyn (Bushwick School for Social Justice), as well as a one-day plaza on Saturday 4/30/2016 from 10AM-6PM.

Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 5 Transportation Committee in June 2016 (pdf) Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Brooklyn Community Board 4 in June 2016 (pdf) Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - presented to Queens CB 5 Transportation Committee in May 2016 (pdf) Wyckoff Avenue Intersection & Plaza Corridor Safety Improvements - Project Workshop - presented in March 2016

Staten Island

New Springville Greenway Connections

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed a bicycle route to link New Springville to popular greenways that border the neighborhood.  The proposed project consisted of bicycle lanes and shared lane markings to guide cyclists to the La Tourette Park Greenway and the New Springville Greenway.  The addition of dedicated space for cyclists, as well as other traffic calming measures, helped improve safety and connectivity for the community.

New Springville Greenway Connections - presented to Staten Island Community Board 2 in May 2016 (pdf)

Van Duzer Street Corridor Transportation Improvements

Bicycle Route Projects

NYC DOT proposed changes to Van Duzer St, St Pauls Ave, Richmond Rd, Swan St, and Targee St in response to complaints of speeding along the corridor. The project calmed traffic by narrowing travel lanes or by scaling the number of lanes to traffic needs. Doing so provided room for additional protections and amenities such as new crosswalks, parking spaces, and bicycle lanes that connect to the St. George Ferry Terminal.

Van Duzer Street Corridor Transportation Improvements - presented to Staten Island Community Board 1 in January 2017 (pdf) Van Duzer Street Corridor Transportation Improvements - presented to Staten Island Van Duzer Street Civic Association in November 2016 (pdf) Van Duzer Street Corridor Transportation Improvements - presented to Staten Island Community Board 1 in June 2016 (pdf) Van Duzer Street Corridor Transportation Improvements - presented to Staten Island Van Duzer Street Civic Association in June 2016 (pdf)

Citywide