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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Press Release #05-46

DOT Installs Signal to Protect Pedestrians Crossing Oriental Boulevard

The New York City Department of Transportation today announced that it will install a pedestrian activated traffic signal on Oriental Boulevard. DOT is currently evaluating several intersections on Oriental Boulevard between Exeter and Irwin Streets to determine where the largest concentrations of pedestrians cross to enter Manhattan Beach Park. DOT will complete its pedestrian volume study in July and aims to have the signal installed before the end of August. Commissioner Iris Weinshall announced the plans for the signal to the Manhattan Beach Civic Association on June 22nd.

"At a recent community meeting in Manhattan Beach the Mayor listened to the community's concerns, and today we are delivering on his promise to take action," said Commissioner Weinshall. "As a result, crossing Oriental Boulevard will now be safer since pedestrians will control the intersection and a red light will tell drivers they must stop to allow time for people to cross. I want to thank the Manhattan Beach Community Group for working with us and I look forward to working further with the Manhattan Beach community on future safety improvements to the area."

Marilyn Chernin, President of the Manhattan Beach Community Group, said "the Manhattan Beach Community Group is thankful to Mayor Bloomberg for responding to our traffic concerns. We are delighted to be working with DOT in our joint effort to find solutions to the traffic problems on Oriental Boulevard. The new traffic signal will enable pedestrians to cross the Boulevard safely with the push of a button."

Once installed, the signal will continuously flash amber on Oriental Boulevard and red on the intersecting street. The pedestrian signal across Oriental Boulevard will display a steady "hand" [don't walk] signal. To cross Oriental Boulevard pedestrians will be now able to push a button to change the signals on Oriental Boulevard from flashing amber, to steady amber, to steady red, stopping traffic. The pedestrian signal will then display the "walking man" symbol and allow for a safe pedestrian crossing. The intersecting street will remain in a flashing red mode.

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