List of Neighborhood Slow Zones

Neighborhood Slow Zones are a community-based program that reduces the speed limit from 30 mph to 20 mph and adds safety measures within a select area in order to change driver behavior. The ultimate goal of the Neighborhood Slow Zone program is to lower the incidence and severity of crashes. Slow Zones also seek to enhance quality of life by reducing cut-through traffic and traffic noise in residential neighborhoods. Learn more about Neighborhood Slow Zones

the Bronx

Norwood Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Norwood applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in May, 2013. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (March 2014) Download a fact sheet about the project (pdf) (September 2013)

Riverdale Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Riverdale applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in November, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 8 in October 2012)

Eastchester Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Eastchester applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (presented to Bronx Community Board 11 in September 2012)

Claremont Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Claremont is a strong candidate for a slow zone because of a high pedestrian crash rate and large number of schools. This was the first pilot slow zone in the city and serves as a model for future neighborhoods. The proposed treatments of the slow zone project will improve safety for all roadway users, reduce traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhance the social quality of the streets. Download a presentation on the Claremont Slow Zone (pdf)

Claremont Neighborhood Slow Zones Pilot

The Bronx neighborhood of Claremont is a strong candidate for a slow zone because of the high pedestrian crash rate and large number of schools. This is the first pilot area in New York City and will serve as a model for future neighborhoods. The proposed treatments of the slow zone project will improve safety for all roadway users, reduce traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhance the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Baychester Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Baychester applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Brooklyn

Boerum Hill Neighborhood Slow Zone

The neighborhood of Boerum Hill, Brooklyn applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Manhattan

Inwood Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Manhattan neighborhood of Inwood applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to widespread community support, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a presentation on Inwood Slow Zone (pdf)

Queens

Jackson Heights Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Queens neighborhood of Jackson Heights applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in May, 2013. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf) (May 2014) Download a fact sheet about the slow zone (pdf) (September 2013)

Elmhurst Neighborhood Slow Zone

P.S. 89 (the Elmhurst School) applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February of 2012. The application was accepted due to a high crash rating, a large amount of schools and daycare centers, good natural boundaries and a strong residential character. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Auburndale Neighborhood Slow Zone

The neighborhood of Auburndale, Queens applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

East Elmhurst/Jackson Heights Slow Zone

City Council Member Daniel Dromm applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February of 2012. The application was accepted due to a high crash rating, an ideal size, good natural boundaries and a strong residential character. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Mount Eden Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Bronx neighborhood of Mt. Eden applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed Zones high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a presentation on the slow zone (pdf)

Corona Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Queens neighborhood of Corona applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed Zones high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a presentation on the Corona Slow Zone (pdf)

Staten Island

Rosebank Neighborhood Slow Zone

The neighborhood of Rosebank, Staten Island applied for a Neighborhood Slow Zone in January, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed zone’s high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

Dongan Hills Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Staten Island neighborhood of Dongan Hills applied for a Slow Zone in February, 2012. The application was accepted due to the proposed Zones high frequency of crashes and injuries, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)

New Brighton-St. George Neighborhood Slow Zone

The Staten Island neighborhoods of New Brighton and St. George applied for Neighborhood Slow Zones in January and February of 2012. The applications were accepted due to widespread community support, strong natural boundaries and an appropriate local street network. The proposed treatments will lower the speed limit to 20 mph within the zone, improving safety for all roadway users, reducing traffic noise and cut-through traffic, and enhancing the social quality of the streets. Download a slideshow about the project (pdf)