2022 Citywide Indicators Reports


Message from the Director

The Mayor’s Office of Contract Services (“MOCS”) is responsible for overseeing the New York City procurement process and leading reform initiatives to improve it. With a citywide consensus that the procurement process needs repair, this administration has embarked on an unprecedented effort to directly address the problems of procurement. This has included a collaboration with the Comptroller’s Office and other stakeholders to analyze and make recommendations for fixing the City’s procurement issues as released earlier this year in the Joint Taskforce to Get Nonprofits Paid on Time. While this extraordinary collaboration in the nonprofit space is long overdue, there are many other ways that challenges in procurement continue to impede the City’s operational effectiveness – slow capital procurement delays much needed infrastructure, outdated rules create roadblocks for agency staff, and a complex, non-standardized process makes it difficult for vendors, particularly small nonprofits and minority and/or women-owned business enterprises (“M/WBEs”), to do business with the City.

Our efforts to address these challenges are already paying off. This year we launched the successful “Clear the Backlog” initiative, which brought best practices, strong leadership, and staff-level dedication to help unlock over $4.2 billion for nonprofits. Through sustained focus on updating rules and regulations and continuing to build on the successful rollout of the Procurement and Sourcing Solutions Portal (“PASSPort”), we are now focused on making sure on-time payment is the norm for vendors and we never experience a backlog again. The launch of PASSPort Public, a procurement transparency portal, has ushered in a new era of insight for a system long seen as too opaque. MOCS has also rolled out a new monthly webinar training series to help vendors learn how to use PASSPort and lower barriers to entry.

In short, we are focused on transforming procurement to be equitable, transparent, accountable, and efficient by leveraging expertise, innovation, and a results-oriented mindset. As we continue this mission, I want to thank all our partners within and outside of City government who are working with us as we do the hard, detailed work to fix the underlying problems in City procurement.

The report below offers an in-depth exploration of City procurement in Fiscal Year 2022 (FY22). While the report is based on dry numbers, our experience has shown that there are human stories behind those numbers, and the more we can do to fix procurement, the better off this City will be.

-Lisa M. Flores, Director of MOCS and City Chief Procurement Officer


Executive Summary

The procurement system of the City of New York (“NYC” or “The City”) affects almost every aspect of City government and public life. MOCS is dedicated to ensuring that the procurement system is equitable, transparent, and efficient for all. MOCS is an oversight and service agency that provides strategic partnership throughout the citywide procurement process for all mayoral agencies including, but not limited to, planning and releasing of agency solicitations, address procurement inquiries, and assisting in payments to vendors promptly. MOCS is also focused on leading procurement transformation in NYC by optimizing existing operations and transforming procurement processes to make it easier to do business with the City.

City procurement is mainly governed by the New York City Charter and the City’s Procurement Policy Board (“PPB”) Rules and is established to reflect the ideals of fairness, integrity, and value, ultimately promoting the delivery of direct services and goods to New Yorkers while maintaining the City’s infrastructure, securing the operation of City government, and advancing community programs. City procurement offices are responsible for protecting against waste, fraud, corruption, and abuse, as well as ensuring fair competitive access.

They also strive to procure and obtain high-quality goods and services for the best value through publicizing solicitations for review from as many viable bidders as possible. Fostering competition for the City's businesses generates an important source of economic opportunity for thousands of businesses in New York and around the world. In FY22, The City procured nearly $38 billion dollars of goods and services from outside contractors, ranging from nonprofits providing community services, to construction firms, to goods suppliers, in order for City agencies to function optimally and further their missions.

MOCS furthers this mission with the continued implementation and enhancements of PASSPort, a cloud-based software platform that provides a single centralized environment for doing business with the City. You can learn more about PASSPort here, find public reporting on PASSPort data here, and get started doing business with the City here.

In addition to digital procurement, MOCS also partners with City agencies and vendors to identify areas for policy and process reform to reduce administrative burdens, achieve responsible use of tax-payer dollars, and to assure high quality service to all New Yorkers. To further MOCS’ commitment to equitable and transparent procurement, MOCS annually publishes this Citywide Indicators Report that provides citywide insight on Mayoral agencies’ information and procurement data.

The Citywide Indicators Report for Fiscal Year 2022 provides information on the City’s procurement spending from July 1, 2021 to June 30, 2022 and demonstrates the impact of procurement. This includes information on the City’s overall procurement value, City contract actions and City agency specific contract value, across various industries and procurement methods in Fiscal Year 2022. MOCS tracks these key indicators of the performance of the City’s procurement system to measure the City’s success and continuously find opportunities for improvement.

Key Takeaways:

  • In FY22, the City procured nearly $37.9 billion worth of goods and services through approximately 135,000 transactions. This represents a 25% increase in total dollar value relative to FY21 ($30.4 billion).

  • The agency with the largest number of transactions (over 93,000) and highest value procured ($10.08 billion) was the Department of Education, which saw a continued increase in procurement awards related to combating the COVID-19 crisis.

  • The City achieved its highest award total to M/WBEs of all-time, awarding $1.378 billion in contracts to M/WBEs in FY22. Meanwhile, the OneNYC program, which includes non-Mayoral agencies, awarded over $6 billion in eligible contracts to M/WBEs, signaling the City’s continued commitment to an equitable recovery.

  • Of the traditional competitive procurement methods, the largest number of procurements and highest amount of dollars continues to be the Competitive Sealed Bid (CSB) method and Request for Proposal (RFP) method. In FY22, there was 505 CSBs for approximately $4.9 billion and 1,515 RFPs for approximately $13 billion.

  • The majority of procurement occurred in the Human Services Industry, totaling nearly $20.3 billion Meanwhile, over half of the City’s total procurement value resulted from contracts worth over $25 million.


 


 

Report Structure

 

Below is an outline organizing how to use this report:

Citywide Report

This report provides a view into what the City buys and how we buy it.

How the City Spends its Money

This section covers transactions that provided direct services to New Yorkers, helped maintain the City's infrastructure, and secured the operation of City government.

Procurement Impact

This section details how City procurement impacts New York City residents in ways beyond fulfilling agency missions.

Construction Indicators Report

This section details the construction contracts registered in FY22 and highlights the top five City construction agencies.

Agency Indicators Report

This report highlights agency data information by procurement method, industry, and by contract value.

Glossary

This section defines relevant key City procurement and contract registration terminology.

Indicators Appendices

This section contains the underlying data presented in the Indicators report. Reference to Chapter 1; Section 12 of NYC Charter More details on the report, data, information, and report structure can be found below.

 



 

How the City Spends its Money

 

New York City is one of the largest procuring entities in the country. In Fiscal 2022, the City procured $37.9 billion worth of goods and services through around 135,000 transactions. This represents a 25% increase in total dollar value relative to Fiscal 2021 ($30.4 billion). These transactions provided direct services to New Yorkers, helped maintain the City's infrastructure, and secured the operation of City government. The following procurement indicators are citywide in scope and include all Mayoral agencies.

back to top


 

Procurement by Industry


New York City categorizes procurements in six major industry categories: architecture/engineering, goods, construction, human services, professional services, and standardized services. See the Glossary for definitions of each industry. See Appendix B for agency-by-agency breakdowns of procurement by industry.

back to top

 

Citywide Procurement by Industry - Fiscal 2022
    • Human Services awarded 6.9 billion dollars at 36 percent of citywide total
    • Professional Services awarded 4.6 billion dollars at 24 percent of citywide total
    • Standard Services awarded 1.8 billion dollars at 9 percent of citywide total
    • Architecture & Engineeering awarded 0.6 billion dollars at 3 percent of citywide total
    • Construction awarded 3.6 billion dollars at 19 percent of citywide total
    • Goods awarded 1.8 billion dollars at 9 percent of citywide total
    • Six major industry categories (Architecture & Engineeering, goods, construction, human services, professional services, and standardized services) combined to an award total of 19.3 billion dollars
    • The Citywide total for awards was 19.3 billion dollars

Procurement by Method

The Procurement Policy Board (PPB) rules lay out the methods for purchasing new goods and services and the procedures that must be followed to continue or modify existing contracts. See the Glossary for definitions of each procurement method. Agency procurement professionals select the appropriate procurement method based on each Agency's business needs and the City’s procurement rules. See Appendix A for agency-by-agency breakdowns of procurement by method.

back to top


Procurement by Method - Fiscal 2022

New Award Methods Count Contract Value
Accelerated 106 $206,175,200 
Assignment 76
$241,934,500 
Buy-Against 3
$5,000,100
Competitive Sealed Bid 505 $4,882,437,800 
Demonstration Project 24
$47,038,900
Listing Application (DOE) 36 $219,576,500 
Emergency 287
$994,156,900 
Government-to-Government Purchase 27
$166,780,200 
Innovative 92
$568,838,000 
Intergovernmental 252 $863,607,400 
Line-Item Appropriation 2,451 $332,935,200 
M/WBE Noncompetitive Small Purchase 811 $110,686,000 
Micropurchase 26,614 $123,962,700 
Negotiated Acquisition 117 $1,756,900,200
Request for Proposal 1,515
$12,962,625,600
Required Source or Procurement Method 150 $903,090,200
Small Purchase 92,146 $402,067,000
Sole Source 63 $2,224,990,300
Task Order 516 $469,876,000 
Continuation Methods Count Contract Value
Amendment 4,533 $2,414,217,100 
Amendment Extension 913 $1,688,700,200 
Construction Change Order 1,262 $289,462,200 
Design Change Order 404 $115,308,500 
Negotiated Acquisition Extension 834 $1,259,695,400 
Renewal 943 $4,602,408,200 
Citywide Total 134,680  $37,852,470,300 


 


 

Procurement by Size

 

Procurement actions valued at greater than $3 million represent over 90% of the total value of procurements made in Fiscal 2022. By contrast, purchases for $1,000,000 or less account for less than 5% of the total dollar volume but over 90% of the total number of procurements processed. See Appendix C for year-to-year totals of individual agencies. 

back to top


Procurement by Size - Fiscal 2022

Size
Count Contract Value
≤ $0 822 ($542,976,300)1
≤ $100,000 125,735 $749,502,400 
≤ $1,000,000 4,403 $1,665,975,400 
≤ $3,000,000 1,656 $3,021,307,900 
≤ $25,000,000 1,866 $13,704,779,300 
>$25,000,000 198 $19,253,881,600
Citywide Total 134,680  $37,852,470,300


Negative contract values refer to agency-authorized contract amendments or change orders that subtract funds from the original contract amount.

 


 

Top Ten Agencies by Procurement Values

 

The ten agencies that procured the highest dollar value of contracts in Fiscal Year 2022 represent over 85% of the total value of City procurements for Fiscal Year 2022.

 

back to top

 

Citywide Procurement Investment: Top Ten Agencies - Fiscal Year 2022

 

  • DOE awarded 31 percent
  • DHS awarded 12 percent
  • DOHMH awarded 9 percent
  • SBS awarded 6 percent
  • HRA awarded 5 percent
  • DEP awarded 5 percent
  • DDC awarded 5 percent
  • DCAS awarded 4 percent
  • DoITT awarded 3 percent
  • NYCEM awarded 3 percent
  • All other agencies awarded 17 percent
  • Top ten agencies (DOE, DHS, DOHMH, SBS, HRA, DEP, DDC, DCAS, DoITT, and NYCEM) combined to award 83 percent, a total of 25.3 million dollars
  • The Citywide total for awards was 30.4 billion dollars

 

 


 


 

Largest Contracts

 

The 15 largest City contracts by dollar value in Fiscal 2022 account for roughly 40% of procurement in the fiscal year and are cumulatively valued at approximately $15 billion.

back to top

 

Top 15 Contracts by Dollar Value - Fiscal 2022

 

# Agency Vendor Name Purpose
Contract Value
1 SBS NEW YORK CITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Citywide Economic Development Services 80121S0011-NYCEDC FY22 Master Contract $1,636,287,422
2 DDC IPC RESILIENCY PARTNERS EAST SIDE COASTAL RESILENCY FROM MONTGOMERY ST TO EAST 15 ST SANDRESM1 $1,272,221,100
3 DOE NYC SCHOOL BUS UMBRELLA SERVICES INC To provide school busing services 44600 $890,369,361
4 DHS PROJECT RENEWAL INC Prov. of Shelter Facilities for Homeless SA at 537 W. 59t St $498,154,047
5 SBS NEW YORK CITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION Citywide Economic Development Services Primarily related to Citywide ED Services Maritime. Intermodal Transportation $435,317,000
6 DHS HELP SOCIAL SERVICE CORPORATION Shelter Facilities for Homeless FWC- Logan Fountain Family. Shelter Facilities for Homeless FWC- Logan Fountain Family $432,342,596
7 DHS BOWERY RESIDENTS' COMMITTEE, INC. Shelter Facilities for Homeless SA 13-12 Beach Channel Dr. $384,852,679
8 DOT AMERICAN TRAFFIC SOLUTIONS, INC. M & O Red Light Camera/Bus Lane Camera & Speed Camera $367,163,436
9 DHS CARE FOR THE HOMELESS Prov. of Trans. Shelter Facilit. for Homeless SA Blondell Av Prov. of a Trans. Shelter Facilit. for Homeless SA Blondell $349,001,558
10 OTI WORLD WIDE TECHNOLOGY LLC Citywide IT Purchasing Contract $347,237,000
11 MOCJ THE LEGAL AID SOCIETY Criminal Trial Indigent Defense - Citywide FY22-23 Legal Aid Society Renewal #1 $342,162,559
12 DHS Westhab, Inc. Prov. of Shelt. Facilit. for Homeless Single Ad.- Briarwood $316,891,854
13 DEP SKANSKA RJ INDUSTRIES HPWWTP JV HP-238: Construction of new Anaerobic Digester Facilities, 82621B0057-BEDC - HP-238 $309,375,000
14 DHS URBAN RESOURCE INSTITUTE Shelter Facilities for Homeless FWC at St. Johns Place $308,494,954
15 DHS Westhab, Inc.
Prov. of Shelter Svcs. for Homeless FWC at Queens Blvd. $278,756,888

 


 


 

Top Fifteen Largest Requirements Contracts

 

A requirements contract is entered into by a City agency with a vendor that generally agrees to supply the City’s entire need for a particular good or service. Using the contract on an “as-needed” basis allows agencies to acquire goods and services quickly, efficiently, and at a lower cost through volume-based discount pricing.

 

back to top

 

Top Fifteen Requirements Contracts by Dollar Value - Fiscal 2022

 

Agency Vendor Name Purpose
Contract Value
DOE
NYC SCHOOL BUS UMBRELLA SERVICES INC
To provide school busing services 44600 $890,369,361
OTI WORLD WIDE TECHNOLOGY LLC Citywide IT Purchasing Contract $347,237,000
DOE LENOVO, INC DESKTOP, NOTEBOOKS, AND MOBILE COMPUTERS 44831 $142,958,169
DOE SDI INC Supply & Delivery of Mechanics Materials AG 1-7 49186 $ 137,779,985
DOE SAVVAS LEARNING COMPANY LLC TEXTBOOKS AND ANCILLARY MATERIALS 48083 $126,900,847
DOE PRESIDIO NETWORKED SOLUTIONS GROUP LLC Instructional Technology Hardware 44969 $109,636,383
DCAS C L CONSULTING AND MANAGEMENT CORP ASPHALT CEMENT, BULK DELIVERY SCOPE: THE PURPOSE OF THIS CON 85721B0161-ASPHALT CEMENT, BULK DELIVERY $95,343,790
DOE NTT DATA INC. Infrastructure build-out services 44968 $80,477,465
DOE RICHMOND COUNTY AMBULANCE SERVICE INC Ambulance Transportation of Students with Disabilities 41654 $69,970,600
DCAS NEW YORK STATE INDUSTRIES FOR THE DISABLED INC TO ENABLE THE CITY OF NY TO UTILIZE TEMPORARY PERSONNEL NYSID TEMPORARY PERSONNEL SERVICE $63,514,449
DCAS JOCAR ASPHALT LLC 85722B0093-HOT ASPHALT PAVING MIX -BOROUGH: QUEENS (BACK-UP) PROCURE HOT ASPHALT PAVING MIX - NYC BOROUGH: QUEENS $63,240,588
DOE TERI NICHOLS INSTITUTIONAL FOOD MERCHANTS LLC Food Distribution Services 48414 $62,255,910
DCAS TILCON NEW YORK INC AGGREGATES, HOT MIX ASPHALT (HWYS) SCOPE: THE MATERIALS IN T 85721B0160-AGGREGATES, HOT MIX ASPHALT(HWYS) $59,221,635
DCAS TULLY CONSTRUCTION CO. INC. 85722B0093-HOT ASPHALT PAVING MIX-BOROUGH: QUEENS-(PRIMARY) PROCURE HOT ASPHALT PAVING MIX - NYC BOROUGH: QUEENS $55,063,048
DCAS UNITED METRO ENERGY CORP HEATING OIL: BIO-BLEND & BIO-HEAT, BULK DELIVERY PROCURE HEATING / BIO-HEATING OIL $52,007,000

 


 


 

P-Card Purchasing

 

The Purchasing Card (P-Card) program is designed to assist agencies in streamlining the process for certain micropurchases. P-Cards are used by agencies to purchase goods and standard services quickly and efficiently, without the intermediate steps required by the City's financial management system.

back to top


Citywide P-Card Purchases - Fiscal 2022

Agency Total Total MWBE
%MWBE
FDNY $7,108,425.62 $1,910,877.58 26.9%
DOT $3,610,859.70 $1,587,798.85 44.0%
NYPD $1,774,578.25 $415,315.11 23.4%
DPR $1,699,268.32 $310,250.22 18.3%
DOHMH $1,676,967.19 $289,259.86 17.2%
DOC $785,065.20 $313,364.30 39.9%
DEP $761,468.09 $368,615.60 48.4%
ACS $607,488.31 $179,861.84 29.6%
DSNY $538,271.65 $49,353.70 9.2%
NYCEM $366,157.80 $2,114.21 0.6%
DoITT $340,174.19 $59,188.60 17.4%
DCAS $290,650.80 $49,241.21 16.9%
DHS $231,293.79 $45,640.91 19.7%
DOP $230,676.74 $12,412.83 5.4%
HPD $181,234.67 $11,988.55 6.6%
HRA $127,141.37 $47,011.25 37.0%
DOB $116,975.65 $25,594.42 21.9%
DOF $73,852.06 $17,853.41 24.2%
DCP $69,608.93 $2,444.08 3.5%
DOI $60,340.84 ($74.87) (0.1%)
Other $325,782.13 $23,968.97 7.4%


 

Contracts by City Council

Discretionary awards are designated by the New York City Council (City Council) to nonprofit organizations through Schedule C of the City’s budget and throughout the fiscal year in monthly Transparency Resolutions. Each nonprofit that applies for funding is vetted by City Council. In addition, MOCS reviews the eligibility of organizations by checking for prequalification in HHS Accelerator and completion of the Capacity Building Training. Discretionary awards that are not registered by agencies in the current fiscal year may be registered in the next.

back to top

 

Contracts by City Council - Fiscal 2022

Agency Total Allocated by Council Total Cleared Registered by Agencies Percent Registered
ACS $10,070,657 $10,040,151 $6,090,101 61%
DCA $230,000 $230,000 $230,000 100%
DCLA* $41,151,900 $40,917,175 $40,366,175 99%
DFTA+ $41,357,134 $40,214,183 $26,286,107 65%
DOHMH~ $59,765,700 $57,332,880 $5,948,966 10%
DHS $2,814,234 $2,786,992 $2,313,466 83%
DOC $20,673 $20,673 $20,673 100%
DOE*^ $37,665,909 $36,997,603 $5,250,000 14%
DOP $156,167 $151,167 $151,167 100%
DPR $3,109,135 $3,034,135 $156,750 5%
DSNY* $46,500 $46,500 $46,500 100%
DSS/HRA $43,364,874 $42,310,959 $38,744,759 92%
DYCD $129,557,756 $123,774,678 $41,189,782 33%
FDNY $463,700 $398,200 $378,200 95%
HPD $17,928,950 $17,498,320 $7,138,002 41%
MOCJ $49,912,796 $48,656,236 $6,777,756 14%
OTI* $24,000 $24,000 $19,000 79%
SBS $30,616,592 $28,962,645 $25,593,188 88%
Citywide Total $468,256,677 $453,401,497 $206,705,592 46%


 

* Denotes agency processes non-CT1 registrations.

(+) DFTA registration total includes Borough President Discretionary Restoration (Senior Services) awards.

~ DOHMH registration total does not include awards processed by Public Health Solutions.

^ DOE registration total does not include awards processed via POC/MTAC actions.

 

Franchises and Concessions

The Franchise and Concession Review Committee (FCRC) is responsible for approving certain franchise and concession transactions as provided in the City Charter and the Concession Rules of the City of New York. A franchise allows a private entity to occupy or use City property to provide a public service, such as telecommunications or transportation. A concession allows a private entity to use City-owned property for a private use that serves a public purpose, such as restaurants in a City park, sports and recreational facilities, or pedestrian plazas. Franchises and concessions typically generate revenue for the City.

In Fiscal 2022, City agencies awarded 22 franchises with a projected revenue of $4.6 million and 63 concessions with a projected revenue of $148 million. The 496 operating franchises and concessions, many registered in previous fiscal years, generated approximately $176 million and $45 million in revenue, respectively. For more information on franchises and concessions please visit the franchises and concessions page.

back to top

 


 

Procurement Impact

 

In addition to City agencies using the procurement process to fulfill their respective missions and to maintain their operations, City procurement impacts New York City residents in other ways. Below are examples of how Fiscal 2022 procurements affected environmental, community, and economic developments in New York City.

back to top

 


 

Reducing The Environmental Footprint of New York City

  

Environmentally Preferable Purchasing

The City’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing (EPP) laws were designed to minimize the environmental harm caused by the City in its role as a consumer of goods. This multi-faceted procurement program established environmentally preferable standards to address a host of environmental concerns including energy and water use, air quality, greenhouse gas emissions, hazardous substances, recycled and reused materials, and waste reduction. Pursuant to Local Laws 118, 119, 120, 121 and 123 of 2005, City agencies are required to meet environmentally preferable standards, such as minimum recycled content, when purchasing particular categories of goods and services and through certain construction contracts. All EPP reports required by law can be found in Appendix E.

back to top

Environmentally Preferable Purchasing − Fiscal 2022

Type Contract Value
Goods: Construction Contracts
$522,535,753
Goods: Direct Purchases
$80,429,942
Total $602,965,699

 


 

Preferred Source

While satisfying the procurement needs of City agencies, the Preferred Source program creates job opportunities for disabled and incarcerated New Yorkers who otherwise might not be able to find work, empowering them with dignity and a sense of purpose. To advance special social and economic goals, all state agencies, political subdivisions, and public benefit corporations are required to purchase approved products and services from preferred sources if their offering meets the agency’s needs. New York State’s Preferred Source requirements were established by Section 162 of the New York State Finance Law. Purchases from preferred sources take precedence over all other sources of supply and do not require competitive procurement methods.

In Fiscal 2022, the City purchased over $259 million of goods and services from New York State preferred source vendors. Local Law 125 of 2013 requires MOCS to report annually on preferred source contract awards made by City agencies, additional details of which are available in Appendix F.

back to top

 


 

Economic Opportunities for M/WBEs under Local Law 1 of 2013


New York is committed to encouraging a competitive and diverse business environment—one that truly reflects the makeup of this City. The Minority and Women-owned Business Enterprises (M/WBE) Program was created to address the disparity between City contract awards to specific ethnic and gender groups and the representation of those groups within the New York City regional market. Overall, the M/WBE Program, led by the citywide M/WBE Director, seeks to increase the contracting opportunities and participation among City-certified M/WBE firms.

In Fiscal 2022, the City awarded approximately $1.4 billion in combined prime and subcontract awards to City-certified M/WBE vendors, an increase relative to Fiscal 2021 ($1.2 billion). This represents a combined M/WBE utilization rate of 22.9% among contracts subject to the City’s M/WBE Program.1, 2 This signifies a decrease from the 25.3% combined utilization achieved in Fiscal 2021. The City continues to diligently work and partner with our City-certified M/WBE firms to help alleviate market disparities and provide necessary goods and services across the City.

back to top

Combined Prime and Subcontract M/WBE Total Award Values Over Time

 

Graph
  • 465.0 million dollars FY 2015
  • 696.5 million dollars FY 2016
  • 1.037 billion dollars FY 2017
  • 1.069 billion dollars FY 2018
  • 1.007 billion dollars FY 2019
  • 1.103 billion dollars FY 2020
  • 1.166 billion dollars FY 2021

 

 

Section 6-129 of the New York City Administrative Code establishes Citywide participation goals for M/WBEs for standardized, professional, and construction services contracts, regardless of value, and for goods contracts valued under $1 million. These may include subcontract awards made on prime contracts awarded prior to July 1, 2013 that are not subject to the law.return to text

2 Under Section 6-129(q) of the New York City Administrative Code (NYC Admin. Code), agencies are not required to set participation goals on the following types of contracts: (1) those subject to federal or state funding requirements which preclude the City from imposing goals; (2) those subject to federal or state law participation requirements for M/WBEs, disadvantaged business enterprises, and/or emerging business enterprises; (3) contracts between agencies; (4) procurements made through the United States General Services Administration or another federal agency, or through the New York State Office of General Services or another state agency, or any other governmental agency; (5) emergency procurements; (6) sole source procurements; (7) contracts for human services; and (8) contracts awarded to nonprofit organizations.return to text

 


 

Prime Contract M/WBE Utilization 


In Fiscal 2022, M/WBE prime contract awards subject to the Program represented 16% of the applicable prime contract universe, compared to 21% in Fiscal 2021. As the table below demonstrates, M/WBEs were awarded approximately $934 million in prime contracts in Fiscal 20221. For additional details on the information presented in this table2, please refer to Appendix G. 

back to top

Prime Contract M/WBE Utilization 


Industry / Size Total M/WBE Total Subject to Program Percent of Total Value
Count Contract Value Count Contract Value
Construction Services 10,229 $355,464,291 13,992 $3,150,939,884 11%
Micropurchase3 10,074 $11,606,483 13,650 $18,591,615 62%
Small Purchase4 54
$3,679,009 70 $4,804,671 77%
>$100K, ≤$1M 30
$16,140,405 44 $27,531,628 59%
>$1M, ≤$5M 53
$120,229,304 133 $342,903,617 35%
>5M, ≤25M 18 $203,809,090 83
$886,011,078 23%
>$25M -
-
12
$1,871,097,274 0%






Goods 5,251 $89,327,502 10486 $154,269,361 58%
Micropurchase 4694 $36,502,404 9671 $68,475,740 53%
Small Purchase 471 $30,272,911 684 $43,955,921 69%
<$100K, ≤$1M 86 $22,552,187 131 $41,837,700 54%






Professional Services 951 $443,583,952 2262 $1,487,112,013 30%
Micropurchase 516 $4,936,922 1582 $13,242,854 37%
Small Purchase 228 $15,012,330 285 $18,720,795 80%
>$100K, ≤$1M 149 $47,800,620 208 $79,566,263 60%
>$1M, ≤$5M 28 $70,102,890 91 $238,422,3591 29%
>$5M, ≤$25M 29 $275,731,189 92 $1,011,637,850 27%
>$25M 1 $30,000,000 4
$125,521,892 24%






Standardized Services 554 $45,146,300 1,713 $929,650,252 5%
Micropurchase 417 $3,333,346 1,433 $8,481,420 39%
Small Purchase 87 $6,421,559 157 $11,360,916 57%
>$100K, ≤$1M 42 $13,331,462 65
$26,526,801 50%
>$1M, ≤$5M 8 $22,059,933 42
$106,300,923 21%
>$5M, ≤$25M - - 11 $127,573,768 0%
>$25M - - 5 $649,406,424 0%






Total 16,985 $933,522,045 28,453 $5,721,971,510 16%
Micropurchase 15,701 $56,379,154 26336 $108,791,629 52%
Small Purchase 840
$55,385,810 1196 $78,842,304 70%
>$100K, ≤$1M 307 $99,824,674 448 $175,462,392 57%
>$1M, ≤$5M 89 $212,392,127 266 $687,626,899 31%
>$5M, ≤$25M 47 $479,540,279 186 $2,025,222,696 24%
>25M 1 $30,000,000 21
$2,646,025,590 1%
1
P-Card purchases were not included in Fiscal 2022 prime contract award count, but were instead counted separately.return to table
2
Purchases for goods and most services over $20,000 up to $500,000 made utilizing the M/WBE Noncompetitive Small Purchase Method which was codified under Section 3-08 of the PPB Rules in November 2019 are also reflected within this table.return to table
3
Micropurchase is a purchase with a value of $20,000 or less for goods and most services or $35,000 or less for construction services. For more details on micropurchase limits, please refer to Section 3-08 of the rules of the Procurement Policy Board.return to table
4
Small purchase is a purchase with a value between the micropurchase limits up to $100,000. For more details on small purchase limits please refer to Section 3-08 of the rules of the Procurement Policy Board.return to table

 


 


 

Agency Prime Contracting Highlights

 

The City continues to make every effort to increase contracting opportunities for the M/WBE community. Certain agencies have distinguished themselves in this regard during Fiscal 2022. In particular, the Department of Design and Construction (DDC) awarded nearly $316 million to M/WBE prime contractors this past fiscal year, which significantly contributed to the City's efforts to award prime contracts to M/WBE firms. The Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR) and the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) awarded nearly $198 million and $80 million, respectively, during Fiscal 2022, also contributing to the City's overall efforts and utilization of M/WBEs.

back to top

  

Prime Awards to M/WBEs: Top 3 Agencies - Fiscal 2022

 

  • DDC awarded 61 percent
  • DPR awarded 6 percent
  • DEP awarded 7 percent
  • All other agencies awarded 26 percent
  • Top 3 agencies (DDC, DPR and DEP) combined to award 74 percent, a total of 682.4 million dollars
  • The Citywide total for awards was 922.1 million dollars

 


 

Subcontract M/WBE Utilization

 

Many M/WBEs use subcontracting opportunities as a point of entry into City contracting. With this in mind, M/WBE subcontracting participation goals are set as material terms on applicable prime contracts to ensure access to City work. The participation goals are set in relation to the scope of work required by the contract and the availability of M/WBEs that are able to perform the work.

As the table below shows, during Fiscal 2022 approximately $466 million were awarded to M/WBEs in subcontracts for standardized, professional, and construction services. These subcontracts were all awarded in Fiscal 2022 regardless of when the prime contract was registered. The subcontracts, distributed among the M/WBE groups, represent 51% of all such qualifying subcontracts awarded. This represents a stable subcontract utilization similar to 59% in Fiscal 2021. For additional details regarding information presented in the table below, please refer to Appendix I.

back to top

 

Subcontract M/WBE Utilization - FY 2022


Sub Industry
Total M/WBE Total Subcontracts on Primes Subject to Program Percent of Total Value
Count Sub Contract Value Count Subcontract Value
Construction Services 669 $351,282,896 1237 $762,319,713 46%
Professional Services 278 $62,444,818 457 $83,720,333 75%
Standardized Services 108 $51,829,079
159 $69,006,060 75%
Total 1,055 $465,556,793 1,853 $915,046,106 51%

 


 


 

Agency Subcontracting Highlights

 

As was the case in Fiscal 2021, DDC accounted for a significant portion of subcontracts awarded to M/WBEs during the reporting period. DDC's $200 million in M/WBE subcontract awards were more than any other agency. DEP and DOT rounded out the top three agencies with approximately $87.5 million and $69 million in subcontract awards, respectively.

back to top

 

 

Subcontracting Awards to M/WBEs: Top Three Agencies - Fiscal 2022

 

  • DDC awarded 40 percent
  • DEP awarded 21 percent
  • DOT awarded 12 percent
  • All other agencies awarded 27 percent
  • Top 3 agencies (DDC, DOT and DEP) combined to award 73 percent, a total of 189.7 million dollars
  • The Citywide total for awards was 259.8 million dollars

 

 


 

Large-Scale Contract Approvals 

Pursuant to LL1, City agencies are required to obtain approval by the City Chief Procurement Officer (CCPO) before soliciting procurements anticipated to be valued at more than $10 million.1 The CCPO is required to review the procurements in order to evaluate whether it is practicable to divide the proposed contracts into smaller contracts, and whether doing so will enhance competition among M/WBEs. A full list of these determinations is included in Appendix J.

back to top

Large-Scale Contract Approvals2

Basis for Determination Count of Basis for Determination
Sum of Contract Value
Multiple Site 4 $104,618,587
Requirements Contract 23 $341,599,643
Single Indivisible Project 10 $198,015,885
Unique/Unusual Good or Service 3 $243,918,848
Total 40 $888,152,848

 

1Under Section §6-129(h)(2)(e) of the NYC Admin. Code, agencies are not required to obtain CCPO approval for capital projects valued over $25 million and contracts excluded under Section 6-129(q) of the NYC Admin. Code.return to table

2Approvals that occurred in Fiscal 2022 but have not yet resulted in the release of any solicitation are reported only after the contract is awarded in order to protect the integrity of the bidding/proposal process.return to table

 


 


 

Waivers, Modifications, and Noncompliance


Waivers may be granted during the solicitation stage for contracts that have M/WBE participation goals. Vendors are eligible to receive a full or partial waiver on a prime contract upon sufficiently demonstrating that the M/WBE goal should be reduced. Vendors filed a total of 91 requests for waivers in Fiscal 2022. Of those, 30 were denied, 7 were approved as full waivers, and 54 were approved as partial waivers. Of the 61 waivers that were approved in the fiscal year, six were associated with a registered contract award within Fiscal 2022. An additional five contracts were registered in Fiscal 2022 in which waivers were approved during previous fiscal years. Waiver determinations are further detailed in Appendix K.

There were two findings of noncompliance and two modifications determined during the reporting period.

The first noncompliance matter involved a Department of Parks and Recreation (“DPR”) contract for the reconstruction of a playground. While the prime contractor was able to utilize M/WBE subcontractors for all scopes of work they identified in their initial utilization plan, they were unable to meet the original goal due to the reduction of tree work and fencing which had originally been anticipated toward the end of the project. After the agency’s substantial completion inspection DPR determined that a sizable portion of tree work and fencing was not necessary. Since the overall work was substantially completed, there were no additional opportunities for the contractor to make up the shortfall in the M/WBE participation goal. Given that the contractor’s inability to meet the goal was caused by DPR’s scope reductions, DPR did not pursue enforcement actions against the vendor but issued a formal letter of noncompliance.

The second noncompliance matter involved a Department of Design and Construction (“DDC”) contract for the installation of distribution water mains and appurtenances. While the vendor agreed to meet the original 10% goal by subcontracting several scopes of work to M/WBE firms, they ultimately only utilized M/WBEs for one scope, falling short of the actual goal. Upon review DDC determined that the original 10% goal may have been miscalculated and was likely overestimated. Due to the overestimation of the original goal, DDC determined that the 10% was unachievable and issued a letter of noncompliance in lieu of pursuing an enforcement action.

The first modification determination involved a DoITT contract for events production services, managed by the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment (MOME). The prime contractor agreed to meet a 30% M/WBE participation goal, subcontracting various services needed for live performance events. Due to the onset of COVID statewide restrictions that mandated the closure orscaling back of performance sizes meant that the vendor was unable to produce the planned large events and had to pivot to smaller scale events to comply with COVID restrictions. Despite this, the vendor made additional efforts to include minority- and women-led not-for-profit organizations where feasible, encouraged an eligible firm to become City-certified and employed a diverse group of temporary workers for its portion of the City Cleanup Corps initiative. Based on the vendor’s good faith efforts to find additional M/WBE subcontractors, MOCS approved the modification request.

The second modification determination involved a contract managed by DDC on behalf of the DEP for the construction of Right-of-Way Green Infrastructure in Brooklyn. The prime contractor initially agreed to meet the 24% goal by subcontracting multiple scopes including landscaping and trucking/disposal to M/WBEs. Prior to the start of the project, changes to the scope required significantly less landscaping that impacted the contractor’s original plan to meet the goal. However, the contractor continued to make good faith efforts and identified M/WBE subcontractors for additional scopes in order to make up the shortfall. While the value of the additional scopes did not make up the deficit in meeting the overall goal, MOCS acknowledged the vendor’s good faith efforts and granted them a modified goal.

There were no formal complaints made during the reporting period.

back to top


 

Construction Indicators

The chart below details the construction contracts registered in Fiscal 2022 and highlights the top five City construction agencies. Click the dropdown below for details about Project Labor Agreements, the Apprenticeship Program Directive, and construction change orders.

back to top

 

Newly Registered Construction Indicators Top 5 Agencies - Fiscal 2022 

Graph
  • DDC Apprenticeship Program Directive: 541 million dollars FY 2021
  • DDC Project labor agreement (PLA): 619 million dollars FY 2021
  • DDC Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive: 16 million dollars FY 2021
  • DDC total: 1.17 billion dollars FY 2021
  • DEP Apprenticeship Program Directive: 443 million dollars FY 2021
  • DEP Project labor agreement (PLA): 150 million dollars FY 2021
  • DEP Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive: 20 million dollars FY 2021
  • DEP total: 613 million dollars FY 2021
  • DOT Apprenticeship Program Directive: 247 million dollars FY 2021
  • DOT Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive: 2 million dollars FY 2021
  • DOT total: 249 million dollars FY 2021
  • DPR Apprenticeship Program Directive: 133 million dollars FY 2021
  • DPR Project labor agreement (PLA): 51 million dollars FY 2021
  • DPR Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive: 51 million dollars FY 2021
  • DPR total: 209 million dollars FY 2021
  • NYPD Apprenticeship Program Directive: 9 million dollars FY 2021
  • NYPD Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive: 46 million dollars FY 2021
  • NYPD total: 55 million dollars FY 2021
  • Other Project labor agreement (PLA): 53 million dollars FY 2021
  • Other Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive: 41 million dollars FY 2021
  • Other total: 94 million dollars FY 2021
  • Apprenticeship Program Directive Citywide Total: 1.4 billion dollars FY 2021
  • Project labor agreement (PLA)Citywide Total: 800 million dollars FY 2021
  • Not subject to project labor Agreement or the apprenticeship directive Citywide Total: 200 million dollars FY 2021
  • Citywide Total: 2.4 billion dollars FY 2021

  


 

Project Labor Agreements and Apprenticeship Program Directive

A Project Labor Agreement (“PLA”) is a pre-hire collective bargaining agreement with one or more labor organizations that establishes the terms and conditions of employment for applicable construction projects. Since 2009, the City and the Building and Construction Trades Council of Greater New York and Vicinity have entered into PLAs for certain renovation and rehabilitation of City-owned buildings and structures, as well as certain specified new construction projects. The PLAs create direct labor cost savings, ensure a reliable source of skilled and experienced labor, permit flexibility in work schedules, and avoid many potential causes of project delays, such as labor strikes which are prohibited by PLAs. The PLAs also contain unique provisions to help small, M/WBE construction firms. All prime contractors and subcontractors on projects subject to a PLA must agree to the terms of the PLA by signing a Letter of Assent prior to award of the project. In Fiscal 2022, approximately 36% of all construction contracts (by dollar value) were subject to a PLA.

The Apprenticeship Program Directive requires that certain construction and construction related maintenance contractors have apprenticeship agreements appropriate for the type and scope of work to be performed that have been registered with, and approved by, the New York State Department of Labor. This requirement expands the pool of work available to graduates of state approved apprenticeship programs, provides ready sources of trained workers to City construction contracts, reduces turnover, and provides clear pathways to stable careers in the construction industry. The Apprenticeship Program Directive applies to individual construction contracts and construction-related maintenance prime contracts valued in excess of $3 million (and subcontracts on such projects valued at or above $2 million) that use apprenticeable construction-related trade classifications. In Fiscal 2022, approximately 51% of all construction contracts (by dollar value) were subject to the Apprenticeship Program Directive.

back to top

 

Newly Registered Construction: Project Labor Agreements & Apprenticeship Program Directive - Fiscal 2022

Agency
Total Construction
Project Labor Agreement (PLA)
Apprenticeship Program Directive
Count Contract Value Count Contract Value Count Contract Value
DCAS 9 $212,941,400 3 $207,031,000 - -
DDC 84 $2,772,426,600 19 $534,813,100
50 $1,979,913,500
DEP 40 $712,528,400 27 $646,582,300
2 $28,858,300
DHS 3 $6,642,500 1 $721,700 - -
DOB 2 $6,928,900 1 $6,000,000

DOC 4 $14,081,400 4 $14,081,400
- -
DOT 10 $141,444,300
0 - 5 $38,319,200
DPR 139 $362,006,700 10 $70,380,600 35 $146,489,400
DSNY 2 $18,293,600 2 $18,293,600 - -
FDNY 22 $10,598,100 14 $9,422,300 - -
HPD 66 $42,907,500 0 - 1 $3,670,200
NYPD 7 $33,355,500 5 $32,452,000 - -
SBS 1 $165,600 0 - - -
Total 389 $4,334,320,500 86 $1,539,778,000 93 $2,197,250,600

 


 


 

Change Orders: Cycle Time & Volume

Change orders are agency-authorized, written documents that allow for modifications of a contract while the contract is being performed. Change orders are used to adjust the value of the contract or the time for performance, and are classified as either construction change orders or design change orders depending on the subject matter of a particular change order. Change orders allow the vendor to complete work included in the scope of the contract. They also allow the agency to make non-material changes to the scope, such as accounting for site conditions that were unknown at the time of contracting.

back to top

 

Construction Change Order (CCO) Processing - Fiscal 2022

Size
Count Original Contract Value CCO Contract Value CCO Contract % in 2022 Days Processing in 2022
DCAS 4 $56,242,000 $178,700 0% 24
DDC 95 $2,508,753,300 $39,502,800
2% 49
DEP 115 $2,587,362,800
$78,958,600
3% 86
DOHMH 1 $525,400
$1,200,000
228% 118
DOT 47 $955,067,900 $97,412,600 10% 48
DPR 152 $394,412,600
$10,031,500
3% 49
DSNY 3 $14,000,000
$9,500,000
68% 33
HPD 2 $920,800
$11,600
1% 81
OTI 1 $778,400 $455,000 58% 53
Total 420
$6,518,063,200
$237,250,800
4% 57

 

Design Change Order (DCO) Processing - Fiscal 2022

Size
Count Original Contract Value DCO Contract Value DCO Contract % in 2022 Days Processing in 2022
DCAS 7 $101,491,900 $4,963,200
5% 42
DDC 74 $141,101,800 $45,323,800
32% 11
DEP 1 $767,300
$58,100
8% 17
DHS 1 $850,000 $339,200 40% 286
DOT 14 $69,899,100
$12,685,300
18% 51
DSNY 1 $40,000
$155,700
389%
79
HRA 1 $3,388,100 $1,000,000 30% 280
LAW 2 $242,100 $40,000 17% 109
Total 101 $317,780,300
$64,565,300
20% 17

 


 


 

Agency Indicators 

Please select an agency below to see a breakdown of their FY22 procurement by method, by industry, and by size.

back to top

Agency Indicators 2022: Administration for Children's Services (ACS)
Agency Indicators 2022: Business Integrity Commission (BIC)
Agency Indicators 2022: Commission on Human Rights (CCHR)
Agency Indicators 2022: Civilian Complaint Review Board (CCRB)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Consumer Affairs (DCA)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Citywide Administrative Services (DCAS)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Cultural Affairs (DCLA)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of City Planning (DCP)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Design and Construction (DDC)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Environmental Protection (DEP)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department for the Aging (DFTA)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Homeless Services (DHS)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Buildings (DOB)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Correction (DOC)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Education (DOE)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Finance (DOF)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (DOHMH)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Investigation (DOI)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Probation (DOP)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Records & Information Services (DORIS)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Transportation (DOT)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Sanitation (DSNY)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Youth & Community Development (DYCD)
Agency Indicators 2022: Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD)
Agency Indicators 2022: Human Resources Administration (HRA)
Agency Indicators 2022: Law Department (Law)
Agency Indicators 2022: Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC)
Agency Indicators 2022: Mayor's Office of Criminal Justice (MOCJ)
Agency Indicators 2022: New York City Emergency Management (NYCEM)
Agency Indicators 2022: New York City Police Department (NYPD)
Agency Indicators 2022: Office of Administrative Trials & Hearings (OATH)
Agency Indicators 2022: Office of Technology & Innovation (OTI)
Agency Indicators 2022: Department of Small Business Services (SBS)
Agency Indicators 2022: Taxi & Limousine Commission (TLC)

 


 

Glossary 

 The glossary which can be found here, defines relevant key City procurement and contract registration terminology. 

back to top

 


 

Indicators Appendices  

Fiscal 2022 Agency Procurement Indicators Report Appendices can be found here.

back to top