Printer Friendly
Translate Page
Sm Med Lg
Get Adobe Reader

go bag
Go Bag

Every household should pack a Go Bag — a collection of items you may need in the event of an evacuation. A Go Bag should be packed in a sturdy, easy-to-carry container such as a backpack or suitcase on wheels. A Go Bag should be easily accessible if you have to leave your home in a hurry. Make sure it is ready to go at all times of the year.

  • Copies of your important documents in a waterproof and portable container (insurance cards, birth certificates, deeds, photo IDs, proof of address, etc.)
  • Extra set of car and house keys
  • Credit and ATM cards and cash, especially in small denominations. We recommend you keep at least $50-$100 on hand.
  • Bottled water and nonperishable food, such as energy or granola bars
  • Flashlight
    Note: Traditional flashlight bulbs have limited lifespans. Light Emitting Diode (LED) flashlights, however, are more durable and last up to 10 times longer than traditional bulbs.
  • Battery-operated AM/FM radio and extra batteries
  • Keep a list of the medications each member of your household takes, why they take them, and their dosages. Medication information and other essential personal items. If you store extra medication in your Go Bag, be sure to refill it before it expires. Get prescription preparedness tips from the NYC Department of Health & Mental Hygiene
  • First aid kit
  • Contact and meeting place information for your household, and a small regional map
  • Child care supplies or other special care items
  • Lightweight raingear and Mylar blanket

Learn more about the importance of having a Go Bag by clicking on the video below.



Emergency Supply Kit

Keep enough supplies in your home to survive on your own, or shelter in place, for at least three days. If possible, keep these materials in an easily accessible, separate container or special cupboard. You should indicate to your household members that these supplies are for emergencies only. Check expiration dates of food and update your kits when you change your clock during daylight saving times.

  • One gallon of drinking water per person per day
  • Nonperishable, ready-to-eat canned foods and manual can opener
  • First aid kit
  • Flashlight
    Note: Traditional flashlight bulbs have limited lifespans. Light Emitting Diode (LED) flashlights, however, are more durable and last up to 10 times longer than traditional bulbs.
  • Battery-operated AM/FM radio and extra batteries (you can also buy wind-up radios that do not require batteries)
  • Whistle
  • Iodine tablets or one quart of unscented bleach (for disinfecting water ONLY if directed to do so by health officials) and eyedropper (for adding bleach to water)
  • Personal hygiene items: soap, feminine hygiene products, toothbrush and toothpaste, etc.
  • Phone that does not rely on electricity
  • Child care supplies or other special care items

Learn more about the benefits of having an emergency supply kit by clicking on the video below.





Be a Ready New Yorker
Take a Ready New York quiz for a chance to win a Go Bag