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FAQs - QUESTIONS FROM NYCHA RESIDENTS

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS FROM PUBLIC HOUSING RESIDENTS

En Español (Spanish) (in PDF)  Русский (Russian) (in PDF)

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
Earned Income Disallowance (EID)
Pets
Rent
Repairs
Security/Quality of Life Issues
Transfers/Moving
 

Accommodations for People with Disabilities
  1. Does NYCHA have accommodations for persons with disabilities? 
  2. What is the definition of a 'person with disabilities' for the purpose of being eligible for one of these special apartments in public housing? 
  3. What makes these apartments for persons with disabilities so accessible? 
  4. A member of my family often requires use of a wheelchair. Am I eligible for an accessible apartment, and if so, how can I apply for one? 
  5. How can I make a request to have modifications made to my current apartment to accommodate a disability? 
  6. I am confined to a wheelchair. If an elevator is out of service after regular business hours, what can I do? 
  1. What is the Earned Income Disallowance (EID)? 
  2. Who can qualify for the EID? 
  3. What types of program are considered eligible economic self-sufficiency programs? 
  4. How does the EID work? 
  5. How do I know if I am eligible for the EID? 
  6. What should I bring to the EID eligibility screening appointment with my Housing Assistant?
  7. If I just learned about the EID, but started a job more than 30 days ago, is it too late to apply? 
  8. When should I report new or increased income? 
  9. If I have received the EID before, can I reapply? 
  10. Can more than one family member receive the EID at the same time? 
  11. Is there a maximum amount of time that a resident can receive EID? 
  12. What happens if there is a layoff or interruption in work after I start receiving the EID? 
  13. Can I postpone the EID to a later date? 
  14. What is mixed finance and how does it relate to the EID? 
  15. Which developments are LLC I and LLC II(Mixed Finance) developments? 
  16. How is EID affected by a development’s Tax Credit status?
  17. Who qualifies for EID in LLC I & LLC II (Mixed Finance) developments? 
  18. How do I know if I am eligible for EID IF I live in a LLC I development? 
  19. Why are some residents who live in a LLC I development not eligible for the EID? 

Pets

  1. Are dogs allowed in Public Housing? 
  2. How many pets can I have in my apartment? 
  3. What other rules apply to having a pet? 
  4. What determines if a dog is vicious? 
  5. How can I arrange for the adoption, spaying or vaccination of my pet?

Rent

  1. When will NYCHA start charging rent when I first move into my apartment? 
  2. I paid my rent this month. Why did I get a dispossess notice? 
  3. I received a notice informing me that I am a Chronic Rent Delinquent and that I must attend an Administrative Hearing. What is a Chronic Rent Delinquent? Am I going to be evicted? 
  4. I am out of work and notified my Housing Assistant. Why hasn't my rent been decreased?

Repairs

  1. How do I request a repair to my apartment? 
  2. How can I request emergency repairs on weekends or off-hours? 
  3. I requested repairs in my apartment. How long will it take before the repair is completed? 
  4. What is a Skilled Trade Work Repair? 
  5. We recently had some work done in our apartment by a NYCHA contractor. The renovation work was unsatisfactory. What can I do? 
  6. What should I do if I find mold in my bathroom? 
  7. Should I be notified when hot water or elevator maintenance is being completed? 
  8. If my apartment feels too cold what should I do? 
  9. How many air conditioners am I permitted to have in my apartment? 
  10. Will NYCHA pay for damage to personal property as a result of a flood in my apartment?

Security/Quality of Life Issues

  1. How can I report excessive noise disturbances? 
  2. What can I do if I suspect drugs are being sold in my building or development? 
  3. Can my tenancy be terminated if a member of my household commits a crime? 
  4. Is it true that if someone is arrested for a felony drug offense that they cannot visit any NYCHA development? 
  5. Why doesn’t my development have the closed circuit television cameras (CCTV’s) to monitor our buildings and surrounding areas to prevent crime? 
  6. A rude NYCHA employee has mistreated me. How do I make a complaint against that person?

Transfers / Moving

  1. Can I transfer to another apartment in my current development or another development? 
  2. How can I find out about the status of my transfer request? 
  3. I was approved for a transfer before my neighbor was. Why did they get an apartment first? 
  4. Why must I transfer to a smaller apartment? 
  5. I live alone in a NYCHA apartment. Can a family member take over the apartment if I move? 
  6. If I move into an apartment to care for a terminally ill relative, will I be able to keep the apartment for myself as a remaining family member? 
  7. Can I transfer to a housing development for senior citizens? 
Accommodations for People with Disabilities 
  1. Does NYCHA have accommodations for persons with disabilities?

    NYCHA has apartments available that are accessible to persons with disabilities. If a person with a disability needs an accommodation to assist them in their current apartment, they should contact their Housing Assistant.

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  2. What is the definition of a 'person with disabilities' for the purpose of being eligible for one of these special apartments in public housing?

    Any family with a member who permanently utilizes a cane, walker, leg braces, crutches or wheelchair, or is otherwise in need of an accessible apartment because of a disability, qualifies for such an apartment.

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  3. What makes these apartments for persons with disabilities so accessible?

    Most of the handicapped accessible apartments are in buildings that have ramps and elevators able to easily accommodate a wheelchair. Also, the apartments have been modified with lowered kitchen and medicine cabinets, bathroom grab bars making the tub more accessible, handheld showers, an accessible toilet and widened doorways to allow wheelchairs to easily maneuver between rooms. They also have enhanced audio/visual alarms using strobe lights to warn hearing-impaired persons when smoke or fire alarms go off. In some units, where medically necessary and prescribed by a doctor, roll-in showers are installed so a person in a wheelchair can easily get in and out.

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  4. A member of my family often requires use of a wheelchair. Am I eligible for an accessible apartment, and if so, how can I apply for one?

    If you, or a member of your household, are mobility impaired and desire a fully converted apartment, fill out a 'Request for Transfer' form available from your Management Office. Your Housing Assistant should be able to help you or you can call NYCHA's Department of Equal Opportunity at (212) 306-4652 or TDD (212) 306-4845.

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  5. How can I make a request to have modifications made to my current apartment to accommodate a disability?

    If you or a member of your household becomes disabled at any time while living in a NYCHA development, you may contact your Management Office or NYCHA’s Department of Equal Opportunity at (212) 306-4652 or TDD (212) (212) 306-4845 to request modifications.

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  6. I am confined to a wheelchair. If an elevator is out of service after regular business hours, what can I do?

    If the elevator is out of service after regular business hours, contact the Emergency Service Department (ESD) at (718) 707-7777 so that they can repair the elevator. If an immediate repair cannot be made, ESD can use a Stair Lift to assist you in getting to your apartment.

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  1. What is the Earned Income Disallowance (EID)?

    The Earned Income Disallowance (EID) works as a temporary income exclusion. This means that if you qualify, a certain amount of your verified gross income is not counted when your household’s rent is being calculated. This temporary income exclusion can last for two 12-month periods and the result is your portion of the rent does not increase in the first year and increases by less than the full amount in the second year.

    The EID came about as a result of the Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998. The policy is meant to support public housing residents in achieving their economic goals. The EID does this through an income disallowance when you move from unemployment to employment, or increase your income based on taking part in a job training program, work placement, adult education, or other program meant to encourage financial independence.

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  2. Who can qualify for the EID?

    Authorized NYCHA Residents who are 18 years of age or older may qualify for EID. To qualify for EID, the total family income must have increased through one of the following ways:

    A resident:

    • Got a new job or a pay raise at his/her current job during participation in an economic self-sufficiency program; or
    • Got a new job and was unemployed before for 12 months or more, or was under-employed making less than $3,625 per year; or was unemployed and received Unemployment Insurance Benefits
    • Was on public assistance and/or participated in a TANF-funded program; received cash payment or services and now is newly employed; or has increased earnings

    The EID does not apply to residents who:
    • Are Section 8 household members who are non-disabled;
    • Are applying for their own public housing apartment;
    • Are non-citizens without eligible immigration status.
    • Pay a flat rent as opposed to an income based rent.
    • Live in a NYCHA Mixed Finance development and is eligible to participate in the Low Income Tax Credit program.

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  3. What types of program are considered eligible economic self-sufficiency programs?

    The eligible programs are those that are intended to encourage, assist, train or facilitate economic independence. Economic self-sufficiency program areas may include:

    • Job training
    • Employment counseling
    • Work placement
    • Apprenticeship
    • Educational
    • English language proficiency programs
    • Financial and household management
    • Mental health and substance abuse
    • Other work activities.


    You should contact NYCHA’s Office of Resident Economic Empowerment & Sustainability at 718-289-8100 to learn about available programs in your neighborhood and throughout the City.

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  4. How does the EID work?

    • If you qualify, for the first 12 months, your portion of the rent does not go up at all even though your income has gone up.
    • For the second 12 months, half of the increased money you earned in earned income will not be counted when calculating your portion of the rent.
    • The EID period will begin the first day of the next month after you start working.

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  5. How do I know if I am eligible for the EID?

    Schedule an appointment with your Housing Assistant. He/she can tell you if you are eligible for EID. Within 30 days after starting your job, you should notify your Housing Assistant about your new income and find out if you qualify for the EID. 

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  6. What should I bring to the EID eligibility screening appointment with my Housing Assistant?

    You should give your Housing Assistant a letter from the economic self-sufficiency program provider stating that you obtained work while participating in their program. The letter should be dated and be no more than 60 days old when you meet with your Housing Assistant. You need to have proof of your new increase in income, too. A letter from your employer would be helpful. Please call NYCHA’s Office of Resident Economic Empowerment & Sustainability at 718-289-8100 if you would like to provide the self-sufficiency program provider with a sample letter to use.

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  7. If I just learned about the EID, but started a job more than 30 days ago, is it too late to apply?

    No, it's not too late to apply. Contact your Management Office to schedule an appointment with your Housing Assistant to see if you qualify for the EID. If you do qualify, then your Housing Assistant will retroactively make the EID effective the first day of the month after you started your job. However, the head of household's account may be subject to retroactive charges because the employment income was not reported as quickly as it should have been. Retroactive charges means you might owe back rent based on income you did not report within 30 days after you started working. Also, the change in income needs to have happened since your last annual review. 

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  8. When should I report new or increased income?

    Any change in income should be reported to the Management Office within 30 days after you started working.

    When you do report new or increased, your rent will be calculated once again. Normally your rent would go up if your income went up, but if you qualify for the EID, then your rent will not go up in the first year. In the second year your rent will only be increased by half of what it would have been. If you do not report your change in income within 30 days, you may owe back rent.

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  9. If I received the EID before, can I re-apply?

    Even though the EID lasts two years, you have a 48-month (four-year) period in which to use it. This means if you lose income the EID ends and begins again when your income increases once more. If you received the EID before and think you might qualify again, you should meet with your Housing Assistant to determine if you have used up your 48-month (four-year) period. If not and you meet the requirements, then you can get the EID.

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  10. Can more than one family member receive the EID at the same time?

    Yes. If more than one family member qualifies, your Housing Assistant will apply the EID to more than one resident within the same household.

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  11. Is there a maximum amount of time that a resident can receive EID?

    Yes, there is a lifetime limit of 48 months. This period begins on the first of the month following the date that you started your job or increased income due to employment. If you leave your employment before the 48-month time period, you should immediately contact your Housing Assistant to put the EID on hold.

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  12. What happens if there is a layoff or interruption in work after I start receiving the EID?

    Ask your Housing Assistant to put the EID on hold. Once you start to work again and your income goes up, report your new income to your Housing Assistant. Your new income will be excluded from your new rent calculations as long as it is within 48 months from your first EID start date.

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  13. Can I postpone the EID to a later date?

    No, once your Housing Assistant determines that you qualify for the EID, you cannot postpone the disallowance to another time.

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  14. What is mixed finance and how does it relate to the EID?

    There are 21 developments that were originally called city & state developments. These developments lost their original funding sources and in 2010 were able to get sources of funding under NYCHAs Mixed Finance program. This allows NYCHA to continue its mission of providing subsidized housing to people who qualify. If you live in a mixed finance developments only some of the households will qualify for EID regardless of the qualifying event.

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  15. Which developments are LLC I and LLC II(Mixed Finance) developments?

    The following developments that fall under LLC I are tax credit developments:

    1. Amsterdam Addition

    2. Bayview

    3. Bushwick

    4. Castle Hill

    5. Chelsea

    6. Drew-Hamilton

    7. Frederick E. Samuel

    8. Manhattanville

    9. Marble Hill

    10. Marlboro

    11. Rutgers

    12. St. Mary’s Park

    13. Stapleton

    The following developments that fall under LLC II are non-tax credit developments:

    14. 344 East 28th Street

    15. Baychester

    16. Boulevard

    17. Independence Towers

    18. Linden

    19. Murphy Consolidation

    20. Williams Plaza

    21. Wise Towers

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  16. How is EID affected by a development’s Tax Credit status?

    A tenant in an LLC 1 development who is eligible to qualify for a tax credit does not qualify for EID.

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  17. Who qualifies for EID in LLC I & LLC II (Mixed Finance) developments?

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  18. How do I know if I am eligible for EID IF I live in a LLC I development?

    If you live in a LLC I development and want to know if you qualify for EID, please ask your Property Management Office.  The Property Manager and/or a Housing Assistant should be able to let you know whether you qualify for the EID.

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  19. Why are some residents who live in a LLC I development not eligible for the EID?

    The HUD funding structure for the LLC I developments is designed in such a way that does not provide for double subsidy, meaning if residents qualify for Tax Credit, they cannot qualify for the EID.

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Pets

  1. Are dogs allowed in Public Housing?

    Dogs are allowed in Public Housing as long as they are properly registered with the development Management Office and have necessary licenses, are spayed or neutered and have all necessary vaccinations. Newly obtained dogs may not weigh more than 25 pounds when fully grown. You should discuss the dog regulations with your Housing Assistant. See NYCHA's Pet Policy for more information.

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  2. How many pets can I have in my apartment?

    Residents may own one dog or one domesticated cat. Residents who possessed pets prior May 1, 2002 may keep the registered pets they have. However, when one of those pets dies, the one pet rule takes effect. A person with disabilities who requires a service animal, such as a seeing-eye dog, may have such an animal in addition to the one pet. Residents may own other pets in accordance with the New York City Health Code. These include small, caged birds (parakeets, canaries), fish and small caged animals (hamsters, gerbils, guinea pigs) as long as they do not create a nuisance.

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  3. What other rules apply to having a pet?

    Dogs MUST be on a leash six-feet long or shorter in public areas. Dogs and cats must be spayed or neutered. Pets must be licensed annually, which costs $8.50. If you have any questions you can call Animal Care and Control of NYC at 212-876-7700 x 4303. Pets are not permitted in Pet-Free Zones. Pet-free zones include Management Offices, playgrounds, Community Centers, laundry rooms, basement areas, roofs or roof landings, and other places that have signs signifying a Pet-Free Zone. Dangerous dogs are not permitted in NYCHA apartments or grounds. Report all non-emergency concerns about dogs or other animals to your Management Office or call 311.

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  4. What determines if a dog is vicious?

    An animal that menaces, threatens, attacks or bites a person may be deemed as vicious. Such animals cannot be kept in NYCHA apartments. Call 911 to report an immediate threat regarding a vicious or dangerous dog.

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  5. How can I arrange for the adoption, spaying or vaccination of my pet?

    Animal Care and Control of New York City (ACC) or a veterinarian can guide you in arranging the adoption or vaccination of your pet. Visit the Animal Care and Control of NYC or call 212-876-7700 x 4303.
    For Spaying & Neuter Resources, click Here.

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Rent

  1. I think my recent rent increase was incorrectly calculated. Is there a way to check the accuracy of my rent?

    Rent should be no more than 30% of adjusted net income. There are ceiling rent or prescribed rent caps for each apartment size. The adjusted net income is gross income minus prescribed deductions. After checking with your Housing Assistant, if you still think there was an error contact your development Manager. You may request a grievance meeting with the Housing Manager. A copy of the grievance procedure is available at the Management Office. If you still think that there is an error in your rent calculation, you can submit a grievance.

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  2. When will NYCHA start charging rent when I first move into my apartment?

    Development staff will contact the new resident when the apartment is ready to move into. Rent is charged from the date that the apartment is ready for occupancy by the new tenant.

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  3. I paid my rent this month. Why did I get a dispossess notice?

    Rent is due on the first business day of the month. By paying rent on time, a dispossess notice and resulting legal action and fees can be avoided.

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  4. I received a notice informing me that I am a Chronic Rent Delinquent and that I must attend an Administrative Hearing. What is a Chronic Rent Delinquent? Am I going to be evicted?

    If you pay your rent late three times in 12 months, you are classified by NYCHA as a Chronic Rent Delinquent and Termination of Tenancy Proceedings will be initiated. You will get several opportunities to explain your situation before an Impartial Hearing Officer. It is important that you attend the hearing to explain why you couldn’t pay the rent. If the matter is still unresolved you could ultimately be evicted for chronic rent delinquency.

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  5. I am out of work and notified my Housing Assistant. Why hasn't my rent been decreased?

    Any change of employment status must be reported within 30 days. If you are receiving unemployment benefits there is a three-month waiting period before rent is adjusted. The rent decrease will be retroactive and you will be credited for the three-month waiting period. If you are not receiving unemployment benefits, your rent may be adjusted the month after you report your change of employment status.

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Repairs

  1. How do I request a repair to my apartment?

    To request a repair, call the Customer Contact Center (CCC) at (718) 707-7771. They will give you an appointment for routine repairs, or make arrangements to address emergencies. Remember to always ask for the work ticket number.

    REDUCE YOUR CALL WAIT TIME - CALL DURING NON-PEAK HOURS - Call volume is heaviest on Mondays and the day after a holiday. The best time to call is during the afternoon.

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  2. How can I request emergency repairs on weekends or off-hours?

    Emergency maintenance staff will respond to emergency repair requests that are called in to the CCC after the Management Office has closed on weekdays, 4:30 P.M. to 8:00 A.M., or all day on Saturdays, Sundays and holidays. These emergency situations will be addressed immediately. The Customer Service Representative may help you deal with the problem over the phone, or call the Fire Department or other governmental agency to assist in the emergency. Emergency repairs are: gas leaks, toilet stoppages that cause serious floods, passengers stuck in elevators, electrical power failures, sewer back-ups, apartment door and door knobs not working and heat and hot water issues. Once the emergency is abated, the repairs will be performed by maintenance staff during regular business hours. If the work is not an emergency, an appointment will be scheduled, only Monday through Friday between the hours of 6:00 A.M. and midnight.

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  3. I requested repairs in my apartment. How long will it take before the repair is completed?

    All work tickets are treated by priority of importance. Emergency repairs such as gas leaks, floods, clogged toilets, persons stuck in elevators, power failures, heat and hot water complaints, missing window guards, broken entrance doors, or any life-threatening situations must be completed immediately. Urgent repairs such as clogged kitchen sink drains or an inoperative refrigerator must be completed within 48 hours. Routine repairs such as a dripping faucet or a broken window handle will be scheduled for the next available time slot or at your convenience. If the matter is still not resolved, call the Centralized Call Center (CCC). The CCC will intervene on your behalf.

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  4. What is a Skilled Trade Work Repair?

    Skilled Trade repairs are repairs that are done by specialists instead of the development maintenance staff. They can include, but are not limited to, replacement of a kitchen cabinet, major plumbing repairs, wiring replacement, extermination, and plastering work. Before a specialist is sent to your apartment, except when the request is for exterminator, a maintenance worker or inspector will observe the condition. If you have a problem, like wiring, an appointment will be set up. The development maintenance worker will try to resolve the repair. If he or she cannot resolve the problem, you will need to make an appointment to have a skilled tradesperson come to your apartment. The maintenance worker will give you a work ticket number. Please call the CCC to request an appointment after 48 hours. They will already have all the technical information in the system so you will just need to set up the date.

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  5. We recently had renovations completed in our apartment by a NYCHA contractor. The renovation work was unsatisfactory. What can I do?

    Notify your Management Office. The Superintendent and the Contract Inspector will examine the work and notify the contractor if they find the work has been faulty. If the work is faulty the contractor will correct the condition.

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  6. What should I do if I find mold in my bathroom?

    Report the condition the Customer Contact Center to schedule an appointment. You can avoid mold in the future and get rid of it yourself by using a mixture of ordinary laundry bleach and water.

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  7. Should I be notified when hot water or elevator maintenance is being completed?

    You are supposed to be notified by development staff and notices should be posted in the affected buildings. If your development management staff does not post service disruption notices, notify your Manager. If you still are not being notified about service disruptions you can notify your Borough Management Office and they will make certain such notices are properly posted in the future.

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  8. If my apartment feels too cold what should I do?

    The City's heat standards requires landlords to maintain apartments at 68 degrees from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. when the temperature outside is less than 55 degrees, from October 1st through May 31st. If the heat in your apartment does not meet this standard, call the Customer Contact Center.

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  9. How many air conditioners am I permitted to have in my apartment?

    Where the electrical service is sufficient to handle the additional electrical service, a maximum of two air conditioners are permitted. Where developments do not have the appropriate electrical capacity to accommodate air conditioners, you may have two special outlets installed for air conditioning. The cost for the additional outlet(s) is $2.00 per month for one outlet or $4.00 per month for 2 outlets. The additional outlet charge is paid for a period of ten years, then it ceases.

    The charge for additional consumption of electricity for air conditioners is $8.00 per month for disabled families, senior citizens, and residents not paying the flat rent, and $10.00 per month for non-disabled families, non-senior citizens, and residents who pay the flat rent, per air conditioner. Residents must request permission and complete the appropriate forms to install an air conditioner prior to the installation and should discuss whether additional electrical outlets are required with their Housing Assistant.

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  10. Will NYCHA pay for damage to personal property as a result of a flood in my apartment?

    Yes, NYCHA will reimburse you for expenses for a flood if it was through no fault of yours. Ask your Housing Assistant how to file a personal property damage claim. You will have to supply receipts showing dates of purchase and the cost of damaged items. If the flood was caused by another resident, such as in the case of a broken washing machine hose, you should contact that resident for any damage settlement.

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Security/Quality of Life Issues

  1. How can I report excessive noise disturbances?

    Report the situation to 311. Do not call 911. Also, advise your Housing Assistant. The Housing Assistant will meet with the noisy neighbors to try to resolve the situation. When you report the matter to your Housing Assistant, you are, in effect, creating a record. If the noisy neighbors does not respond and the allegation is substantiated by management, administrative action can be initiated to terminate the family’s tenancy.

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  2. What can I do if I suspect drugs are being sold in my building or development?

    You can report it to your Manager who will keep the information confidential and then notify the Police Department. Or, you can report it directly to the Police Department yourself by calling your local police precinct. You may also call 911 if you feel that there is a serious or immediate threat.

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  3. Can my tenancy be terminated if a member of my household commits a crime?

    NYCHA has the right to deny persons with criminal records residency in order to provide a safe environment for all residents. If someone was arrested and gave your address or was arrested and resides in your apartment, you will have an opportunity to a hearing before any eviction proceedings are undertaken. If the crime was very serious and the offender is convicted, you may have to agree to permanently exclude that individual from your apartment.

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  4. Is it true that if someone is arrested for a felony drug offense that they cannot visit any NYCHA development?

    This is true. NYCHA has implemented a no trespass policy which denies access to NYCHA property to anyone arrested for a felony drug offense on or adjacent to NYCHA buildings and grounds. This policy seeks to combat drug-related crime and protect residents in the City's public housing.

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  5. Why doesn’t my development have the closed circuit television cameras (CCTV’s) to monitor our buildings and surrounding areas to prevent crime?

    The CCTV monitoring program has significantly reduced crime at developments where they have been installed. However, the systems are expensive and funding is limited. NYCHA has installed some smaller CCTV systems where local elected officials have obtained funding for the installation.

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  6. A rude NYCHA employee has mistreated me. How do I make a complaint against that person?

    Request an appointment to discuss this with your Manager. If you don't get any results, report the matter to your Borough Management Office or call 311.

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Transfers / Moving

  1. Can I transfer to another apartment in my current development or another development?

    Your Housing Assistant can clarify the various transfer guidelines. Some reasons that NYCHA may deem appropriate for a transfer include: overcrowding, having an apartment that is too large for your family, travel hardship in getting to your job, or the need to be closer to a medical facility or family member who is aging or ill who needs your help, or whom you can help. You must fully document your need for a transfer.

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  2. How can I find out about the status of my transfer request?

    Visit or call your Housing Assistant and request the status of your transfer request. There is no way to tell when vacancies will occur, therefore we can’t tell you when you will be called for an apartment. There is also no way to predict when a person’s referral will be selected because the TSAP computerized waiting list continually selects the application or transfer request with the highest priority and certification date. We can, however, tell you how many families are waiting for the same size apartment at the development where you are on the waiting list. After waiting two years without being called for an apartment, you may request that your transfer be assigned to another development. You can choose this development from the Interviewer’s Guide to Vacancies which lists developments with greater vacancy rates.

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  3. I was approved for a transfer before my neighbor was. Why did they get an apartment first?

    Your neighbor’s circumstances may have been different from yours. They may have required a transfer because of health reasons, or they may have needed a different size apartment than you, or the development they transferred to might have had a greater turnover of apartments.

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  4. Why must I transfer to a smaller apartment?

    According to NYCHA procedure, the number of occupants residing in the apartment determines the number of rooms assigned. If you have too many rooms, the lease requires you to sign a consent form and move to a correct size apartment. You may choose any development and will stay on their waiting list for one year. After that, you will be placed on a waiting list for the correct size apartment at your current development.

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  5. I live alone in a NYCHA apartment. Can a family member take over the apartment if I move?

    In order to sign a lease and take over your apartment the person must be a part of your immediate family and must have lived in the apartment with NYCHA’s knowledge and permission at least one year prior to your moving. That person must pass a criminal background check and have their income verified to meet the criteria of a new resident before getting a lease.

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  6. If I move into an apartment to care for a terminally ill relative, will I be able to keep the apartment for myself as a remaining family member?

    As of November 24, 2002, your mother may request permanent residency for you subject to approval by the Housing Manager. However, for you to retain the apartment for yourself you will have had to lived there continuously with the Manager’s approval for a full year before your mother passed away. Also, at least one person in your new household must have a verifiable income; the family must be income eligible for public housing and must pass all requirements for new applicants.

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  7. Can I transfer to a housing development for senior citizens?

    Yes. There are 42 NYCHA developments exclusively for seniors 62 years of age or older. In addition, there are “senior only” buildings at 15 of NYCHA’s 344 mixed-population developments. Most of the senior developments offer services specifically aimed at seniors. There are more than 10,000 apartments in the “senior only” buildings. Seniors also live in mixed-population buildings. All members of the household in a senior only building must be 62 or older.

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