New York City Housing Authority


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Section 3: Frequently Asked Questions


 

  1. What is Section 3?
  2. Who is a Section 3 Resident?
  3. What is the Resident Employment Program?
  4. How do I learn about Section 3/REP job opportunities?
  5. How do I get placed in Section 3/REP jobs?
  6. What types of skills or certificates do I need for a Section 3/REP job?
  7. What types of jobs are available through Section 3/REP jobs?
  8. What are the categories of prioritization for Section 3 hiring?
  9. What efforts are NYCHA taking to improve the Section 3/REP job placement process?
  10. What is a Section 3 Business Concern?
  11. What is a Registered Section 3 Business Concern?
  12. How do I Register as A Section 3 Business Concern?

 

1. What is Section 3?

Section 3 is a regulation in the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 that encourages housing authorities to connect public housing residents and low-income persons to employment opportunities through housing authority contractors. Under the regulation, contractors are required, “to the greatest extent feasible,” hire public housing residents (or other low-income persons when no public housing residents are available or qualified for the position) when contracting with public housing authorities. The Section 3 regulation can be found through the HUD web site (in PDF).


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2. Who is a Section 3 Resident?

A Section 3 resident is:

  • A public housing resident OR
  • A low- or very low-income person, residing in the metropolitan area.
Low income or Very low-income persons are defined as families whose incomes do not respectively exceed 80% or 50% of the median income (varies by household size) for the area (see chart).


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3. What is the Resident Employment Program?

NYCHA’s Resident Employment Program (REP) extends the reach of the federal Section 3 regulation. In 2001, NYCHA implemented REP which mandates that any contractor who is awarded a contractor exceeding $500,000 must spend 15 percent of their labor cost on the employment of NYCHA residents.


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4. How do I learn about Section 3/REP job opportunities?

NYCHA residents who are interested in job opportunities created through Section 3/REP can learn more about how to apply by attending a REES Information Session. These information sessions are held twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9 a.m. in the REES Central Office  at:

787 Atlantic Ave.
Brooklyn, NY 11238

 

NYCHA residents who are specifically interested in the construction trades, but lack direct experience working in the field, are encouraged to apply to the  NYCHA Resident Training Academy (NRTA). The NRTA offers three employer-linked training tracks, including an eight-week construction training course. The minimum requirements for construction training, include:

  • Authorized NYCHA resident on the lease
  • 18 years of age or older
  • High school diploma or GED
  • Seventh (7th) grade reading and math proficiency
  • Able to pass a drug test
  • Able to lift 50 lbs or more
  • Be able to perform eight (8) hours of physical work each day

Any NYCHA resident with construction experience or successful graduate of the NRTA is eligible for construction-related employment opportunities available through Section 3/REP.

For more information on how to apply to the NRTA or to learn more about Section 3/REP opportunities, call the REES Hotline at (718) 289-8100.


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5. How do I get placed in Section 3/REP jobs?

Once Section 3/REP jobs become available, REES staff match qualified candidates with the opportunities and provide referrals to contractors for interviews. For each available opportunity, REES will refer at least two qualified NYCHA residents. The contractor may select the candidate who is the best fit for the available job. 


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6. What types of skills or certificates do I need for a Section 3/REP job?   

Necessary certifications vary depending on the type of work on the job site. At a minimum, most construction sites require that employees complete the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA) 10-Hour Construction Course, which provides an introduction to OSHA standards and requirements.


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7. What types of jobs are available through Section 3/REP jobs?

 

Entry level and more skilled jobs may be available to qualified NYCHA residents interested in employment through Section 3/REP. Some examples of job titles, include:

Carpenter
Demolition Laborer
Electrician
Elevator Apprentice/Helper
Elevator Mechanic
Laborer
Mason Tender/Bricklayer
Painter
Plumber/Jobber
 
Cable Pulling/Technician
Maintenance Assistant
Field Support Assistant


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8. What are the categories of prioritization for Section 3 hiring?

Category 1 residents: Residents of the housing development or developments for which the Section 3 covered assistance is being spent

Category 2 residents: Residents of other housing developments managed by the housing authority for which the Section 3 covered assistance is being spent

Category 3 resident: Participants in HUD Youthbuild programs being carried out in the metropolitan area in which the section 3 covered assistance is being spent

Category 4 resident: Other low-income or very low-income residents of the metropolitan area in which the section 3 covered assistance is being spent


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9. What efforts are NYCHA taking to improve the Section 3/REP job placement process?

NYCHA has dramatically increased the number of residents placed in jobs with NYCHA contractors over the past few years. Since 2008, job placement for NYCHA residents has increased from 43 job placements in 2008 to 1,241 job placements in 2011. The NYCHA Resident Training Academy (NRTA) is one avenue to provide a qualified workforce to NYCHA contractors. To the greatest extent feasible, construction training graduates are matched with hiring opportunities available through Section 3 and REP contractors. While NYCHA has experienced recent success placing qualified public housing residents with contractors, NYCHA is undergoing an extensive review of the Authority’s contract monitoring and job placement processes in order to maximize the opportunities for residents to gain meaningful employment with NYCHA contractors.


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10. What Is A Section 3 Business Concern?

A Section 3 Business Concern is a business:

  • That is at least 51% or more owned by Section 3 residents, or
  • Whose permanent full-time employees include persons, at least 30% of whom are currently Section 3 residents, or within 3 years of the date of first employment with the business concern were Section 3 residents, or
  • That provides evidence of a commitment to subcontract in excess of 25% of the dollar award of all subcontracts to be awarded to business concerns that meet the qualifications in either of the two preceding bullet points.

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11. What Is A Registered Section 3 Business Concern?

A Registered Section 3 Business Concern is a Section 3 Business Concern that has registered with NYCHA, through the successful submission of this form, and subsequently receives acknowledgement by NYCHA of its Section 3 Business Concern status.

Please be advised that by registering as a “Section 3 Business Concern,” your business will be added to a publicly accessible database of NYCHA recognized Section 3 Businesses Concerns that NYCHA and/or its vendors can access to fulfill the Section 3 Business Concern provision. Such registration is not a guarantee of business contracts with NYCHA or with NYCHA’s vendors. Proof of Section 3 status is required at time of contracting (or subcontracting). NYCHA reserves the right to request your business to re-register as a Section 3 Business Concern at any time. Failure to do so may result in the removal of your business from the database.

Use this chart to check if you and or your workforce qualify as low-income status.

 

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12. How do I Register as A Section 3 Business Concern?

To register as a Section 3 Business concern, please click here.


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