State Legislative Process

  • An idea for a bill is submitted to Bill Drafting Commission where it is translated into formal language. If the Mayor wishes to put forth legislation, he must find an Assembly member or Senate member willing to propose the legislation before their respective legislative bodies.
  • The bill is "introduced," assigned a number by which it will be known, and then printed.
  • The bill is assigned to appropriate committee for discussion and review. If a majority of members on the committee support it, the bill is "reported to the floor." If not, it is said to have "died in committee."
  • All bills requiring an expenditure of state funds must first be sent to the Ways and Means Committee. They make sure the state can afford the cost of the bill. These Bills won't reach the floor for a vote unless Ways and Means okays the expenditure.
  • Final Version of the bill is printed - must be on Member's desk for at least three days before being voted on.
  • The bill reaches floor for debate and vote.
  • If the bill originates in and passes through the New York State Assembly, it is then sent on to the New York State Senate, where it goes through a similar process. Conversely, if a bill originates in and passes through the New York State Senate, it is then sent on to the New York State Assembly. If both houses agree to pass a bill, it is then sent to the Governor for his signature.
  • The Governor can either sign a bill or veto it. If the Governor vetoes a bill, it can still become a law when a 2/3 majority in both houses vote in favor of the bill. This is known as an "override."
  • The bill, once signed by the Governor, becomes law in New York State.
Visit the New York State Assembly website
Visit the New York State Senate website
Visit the Governor's website
Visit the New York State website