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Diversity

The New York City Law Department has long been committed to recruiting, retaining, and promoting a diverse community of attorneys and support professionals. The Law Department's Diversity Committee works to enhance the recruitment and retention of attorneys of all backgrounds. The Law Department's Women's Committee focuses on issues of particular importance to the 60% of our attorneys who are women. 

Diversity Highlights
Today, diversity is reflected throughout the ranks of the Law Department. Five of our 17 division chiefs are Black, Hispanic, or openly gay or lesbian. More than half of our attorneys serve in divisions led by women.

As of February 1, 2011, over 20 percent of the attorneys in the office self-identify as Black, Hispanic, or Asian.  9 attorneys in the office self-identify as disabled.  31 attorneys in the office self-identify as GLBT.

As of September 2011, 31 percent of our junior attorneys (graduating between 2004 to 2011) self-identify as Black, Hispanic, Asian or LGBT.

The Law Department recruits at numerous minority job fairs, including Black Prosecutors Job Fair, Northeast BLSA, and the Southeastern Minority Job Fair.

Women at the Law Department: A History of Firsts
The office is particularly proud of its first female African-American attorney, Jane Bolin (Yale, Class of 1931), hired during the LaGuardia administration in 1937. Jane left the Law Department in 1939 to become the first African-American woman judge in the United States.

The Law Department hired its first woman attorney, Anna Moscowitz Kross (NYU, Class of 1910) in 1918. Kross left the Law Department to become the first woman Magistrate in New York State in 1933.

Another early woman at the Law Department, Justine Wise Polier (Yale, Class of 1928) became the first woman judge above the level of magistrate in New York State.

And no account of the history of women at the Law Department would be complete without Edith Spivack (Columbia, Class of 1932). Edith joined the Law Department in 1934 and served with distinction for seventy years until her retirement in 2004.


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