Child Support Calculator

Enter the number of children for whom support is being requested


Enter the noncustodial parent's gross annual income (before deductions)


Get the estimated annual support amount*

* Orders are paid weekly, biweekly, monthly, or bimonthly. Divide the estimated annual support amount by the frequency that applies to the way the noncustodial parent is paid.

DISCLAIMER: Use the Child Support Calculator to get an idea of how much a noncustodial parent might owe in child support in New York State. It is only an estimate and is adjusted to reduce the gross income by Medicare, FICA and local NYC taxes. The court may, under certain circumstances, deviate from the formula. In addition, other factors are routinely considered in setting the order amount. Read the Child Support Standards Act for more information.

The Child Support Standards Act
The Child Support Standards Act was developed to ensure that child support awards in New York State were fair and consistent. The goal is to give children the same standard of living they would have if their parents were together. For more information on the law call 311 or the New York State Child Support Helpline at 888-208-4485.

The law states that the basic support award be set at a fixed percentage of parental income, depending on the number of children for whom an order is being requested:

 

Number of Children %
1 17%
2 25%
3 29%
4

31%

5+

at least 35%


These percentages are applied to almost all parental earnings up to $141,000, minus Medicare, FICA and NYC tax deductions. Child or spousal support actually paid, based on a court-order or written agreement, may also be deducted before calculating the child support order. Earnings include worker's compensation, disability payments, unemployment insurance, social security, pensions, and many other forms of income. After $141,000, the court can choose whether or not to use the percentage guidelines.

In addition to the basic support award, the child support order must include medical support, which means health insurance and payments for any out-of-pocket medical expenses for the child. Either parent may be required to provide health insurance coverage for the child, if it is available at a reasonable cost. The basic award may be increased to include a prorated share of child care expenses, if the custodial parent is working or in school. In addition, the court may increase the award to include a prorated share of educational expenses for the child.

New York State laws protect low-income noncustodial parents:

  • If the noncustodial parent’s income is below the Federal Poverty Level ($11,670 for 2014), the child support order may be established at $25 per month and the amount of arrears will be capped at $500.

  • If the noncustodial parent’s income is below the New York State Self-Support Reserve ($15,755 for 2014), the child support order may be established at $50 per month.