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NYC Department of Housing Preservation & Development
Residential Building Owners

Proactive Preservation Initiative-FAQs

Proactive Preservation Initiative FAQs:

What is the Proactive Preservation Initiative (PPI)?
Much of the information the City has with regard to conditions in multifamily properties is gathered in response to tenant complaints called in to 311. This helps HPD identify and address many problems that affect tenants’ quality of life, health and safety. But there are also a number of properties that are falling into disrepair, or being neglected by their owners, whose worsening conditions are not being reported by the tenancy. These buildings are cause for concern as they can easily become blighting influences on our neighborhoods and hazardous places in which to live. The Proactive Preservation Initiative is the City’s approach to identifying and addressing deteriorating physical conditions in these multifamily buildings before they endanger the health and safety of residents and threaten the quality of the surrounding neighborhood. Proactive Preservation uses a network of information sources along with a combination of enforcement actions and incentives to ensure that owners are both accountable and equipped to maintain their buildings in safe condition. General questions about the Proactive Preservation Initiative can be directed to the Division of Neighborhood Preservation at one of the field office locations listed below, or via e-mail at hpdproactive@hpd.nyc.gov.

How does Proactive Preservation work?
Proactive Preservation is an intra-agency and cross-agency initiative, and a neighborhood-based initiative. It is not a program with a set of one-size-fits-all solutions, but more a systematic approach that deals with buildings, their tenancy and their owners on an individual basis. Just as there is no one set of problems, there is no one set of solutions. Through Proactive Preservation, HPD enforcement and preservation functions work together to identify troubled buildings and, using knowledge of building conditions and needs, target both our loan dollars and asset management resources. Advocates and local elected officials, along with representatives from the New York City Housing Development Corporation (www.nychdc.com), New York State’s Homes and Community Renewal (www.nyshcr.org/), and the New York field office of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (www.hud.gov/local/ny/working/newyorkcityoffice.cfm) join HPD at the table to share information and resources dealing with troubled building stock.

How are buildings selected for the Proactive Preservation Initiative?
HPD uses a combination of building and neighborhood data and referrals from community partners to identify buildings for evaluation. Depending on the outcome of the initial evaluation, buildings may be referred to the Proactive Enforcement Bureau (PEB) for roof-to-cellar inspections by Housing Code inspectors or placed on a watchlist for further monitoring. Building owners may be offered assistance by the Division of Neighborhood Preservation (DNP) or Asset Management, may apply to one of HPD’s loan programs or, depending on conditions and responsiveness, subject to enforcement or legal proceedings.

How many buildings does HPD plan to review through the Proactive Preservation Initiative?
Division of Neighborhood Preservation (DNP) field staff will conduct surveys of approximately 500 buildings in the program’s first year.

How do I know if a building is part of the Proactive Preservation Initiative?
If a building is included in Proactive Preservation, it will be surveyed by the Division of Neighborhood Preservation (DNP), and DNP will attempt to contact owners with the survey results.  If the building warrants a roof-to-cellar inspection by the Proactive Enforcement Bureau (PEB), PEB inspectors will post notices in the building to notify tenants prior to the inspection. PEB will also send letters to owners notifying them of the issues with the building. The buildings that receive a PEB inspection will be posted on a list on HPD’s website. The buildings that correct 80% of their violation and receive a follow-up rating of ‘fair’ or ‘good’ will be removed from the list. Tenants may also be contacted by community groups, depending on the needs or the issues of the building.

I understand that the addresses of buildings that are subject to the cellar-to-roof inspections will be made public.  Where can I find more information on that? Once on it, how does a building get removed from the PPI list?
The public list will contain the addresses of all buildings inspected by the Proactive Enforcement Bureau (PEB). The list will be published on the HPD website and will be refreshed every six months. Buildings that are NOT inspected by the PEB will not be placed on this list. The list will include not only the address of the building but its pre-Proactive inspection violation count and its post-Proactive violation counts. These violation counts show trends—whether the building conditions are worsening, stable or improving. All buildings on the Proactive Preservation list will be re-inspected 45 days after the initial inspection and those that experience a drop of 80% or more in their post-Proactive violation counts will be resurveyed and, if found to be in fair condition, will be removed from the list. All buildings will continued to be monitored and those buildings that do not improve will be subject to escalated enforcement activity.

As a property owner, how can I avoid having my building in the PPI?
The Proactive Preservation Initiative is a framework for identifying at-risk buildings but not all building identified in PPI are in serious disrepair. HPD’s goal through PPI is to help ensure accountable ownership and offer owners who are interested in working with the City the chance to address their building problems. HPD offers help through DNP owner support, asset management support, or possibly loans or other financial assistance. However, those buildings that are in severe condition or where owners are not cooperating with the City to maintain the health of the building, will be subject to enforcement and having their building published on the list. Therefore, the only sure way to keep your building off the list is to ensure that your building is in good livable condition and up to Housing Maintenance Code requirements. The best way to avoid violations is the simplest: respond to tenant complaints and make necessary repairs in a timely manner before a Housing Inspector is dispatched.

If my building is targeted by HPD’s Proactive Preservation Initiative, how can I get a loan to help bring my building back to health?
There are several loan programs at HPD that may be available to help owners with rehabilitation. For more information, please contact your nearest borough office of the Division of Neighborhood Preservation at the number listed at the end of this FAQ below, or check online at http://www.nyc.gov/html/hpd/html/developers/finance_rehabilitation.shtml.

There are problems with the conditions in my apartment. What should I do?
As a tenant, you should continue to report problems with building conditions to your landlord. If you do not get a satisfactory response, call 311 to request an inspection by HPD’s Code Enforcement.

How do I get information about complaints or violations?
HPD attempts to call and send all written correspondence to a property owner at the registered telephone number and address for the managing agent of the building. Tenants who are curious about violations in their building can access HPD’s online system at http://167.153.4.71/Hpdonline/provide_address.aspx and search for their building by address, where they can find open violations, litigation status, and a host of other information.

For owners, to find more information on Property Registration or to ensure that your contact information is up to date, you can go to HPD’s website at http://www.nyc.gov/html/hpd/html/owners/property-reg-unit.shtml or call HPD’s Registration Assistance Unit at 212-863-7000.

If violations are issued and are corrected, how can I get violations removed?
You have several options for violation removal.  Generally, violations may be certified within a fixed time period indicated on the Notice of Violations.  Certification of repairs may now be performed online by using the E-certification application on HPD's website (http://www.nyc.gov/html/hpd/html/owners/e-certification.shtml).  This is a free process and should be used to keep your building record up to date.  

If the correction period for a violation has passed, you can apply for a Dismissal Request with the Division of Code Enforcement. Instructions on how to apply and the required fees are available on HPD’s website or at a Code Enforcement Borough Office (see contact information below).  

For more details on violation removal, you can go to HPD’s website http://www.nyc.gov/html/hpd/html/owners/correcting-violations.shtml 

My building is in the Alternative Enforcement Program (AEP) program. Will it also be affected by this initiative?
Proactive Preservation and AEP are separate programs. AEP buildings are not eligible for the proactive preservation initiative.

How does Proactive Preservation differ from AEP?
Proactive Preservation is an HPD initiative intended to stop the cycle of distress before buildings require the type of enforcement authorized under the AEP statute. Proactive Preservation will employ a wider range of tools than AEP, including low-cost financing, to assist cooperative owners to address building conditions before the building reaches crisis point.

HPD Borough Offices
Bronx
HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office - Bronx/Manhattan
1932 Arthur Avenue, 3rd Floor, Room: 300
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 579-2930
Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.


HPD Code Enforcement Office
1932 Arthur Avenue, 3rd Floor
Bronx, NY 10457
(718) 579-6790
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Brooklyn
HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office
210 Joralemon Street, 13th Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 802-4503
Monday-Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office
Greenpoint-Williamsburg Neighborhood Services
210 Joralemon Street, 13th Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 802-4664
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HPD Code Enforcement Office
210 Joralemon Street, Room: 806
Brooklyn, NY 11201
(718) 802-3662
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office                          
Brooklyn East/Queens
701 Euclid Avenue, 1st Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 348-2550
Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HPD Code Enforcement Office
701 Euclid Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11208
(718) 827-1942
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Manhattan
HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office
Satellite Office
94 Old Broadway, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10027
(212) 281-2475
Tuesday and Thursday, 12 pm to 4 p.m.

HPD Code Enforcement Office
94 Old Broadway, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10027
(212) 234-2541
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Queens
HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office-Satellite
120-55 Queens Blvd.,
Queens Borough Hall, 1st Floor
Kew Gardens, NY 11424
(718) 286-2758
Tuesday and Thursday 12 p.m. to 4 p.m.

HPD Code Enforcement Office
120-55 Queens Blvd.
Queens Borough Hall, First Floor
Kew Gardens, NY 11424
(718) 286-0800
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.


Staten Island
HPD Neighborhood Preservation Office
120-55 Queens Blvd.,
Queens Borough Hall, Ground Floor
Kew Gardens, NY 11424
(718) 286-2758
Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

HPD Code Enforcement Services
Staten Island Borough Hall
Staten Island, NY 10301
(718) 816-2340
Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.



All Boroughs
The Division of Asset & Property Management
(for City-Owned Buildings)
94 Old Broadway, 7th Floor
New York, NY 10027
(212) 694-2381 or
(212) 694-2833



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