Vision Zero Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans

Summary

Vision Zero 2019 Safety Action Plan Cover

Vision Zero seeks to eliminate all deaths from traffic crashes regardless of whether on foot, bicycle, or inside a motor vehicle. The Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans are one of 63 Vision Zero initiatives advancing that goal for all street users. Although pedestrian deaths have declined since the start of Vision Zero, they still consistently make up the majority of New York City’s traffic fatalities.

In an effort to drive these fatalities down, DOT and NYPD released a set of five plans in 2015, each of which analyzes the unique conditions of one New York City borough and recommends actions to address the borough’s specific challenges to pedestrian safety. These plans pinpoint the conditions and characteristics of pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries; they also identify corridors, intersections, and areas that disproportionately account for pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries, prioritizing them for safety interventions. Each Borough Plan was shaped by the community input from nine Vision Zero Pedestrian Safety Workshops held across the five boroughs and thousands of comments collected through the interactive Vision Zero Input map. Finally, these plans recommend a series of actions that intend to alter the physical and behavioral conditions on city streets that lead to pedestrian fatality and injury.

In February of 2019, DOT & NYPD released an update to the Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans. The report updates the Priority Locations identified in the 2015 Vision Zero Borough Pedestrian Action Plans with current data, Vision Zero innovations, progress on Vision Zero initiatives, and introduces new actions.

Download the 2019 Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans Update (pdf)

Queens Boulevard showing right turn lane with painted STOP and arrow aside of a dedicated Bike Lane.

Action Plan

New Actions for 2019
  • Add exclusive pedestrian crossing time (LPIs) at every feasible intersection on all new Priority Corridors by the end of 2019
  • Modify signal timing to reduce speeding on all feasible new Priority Corridors by the end of 2019
  • Launch Integrated Data-Driven Speed Reducer Program (speed humps & speed cushions)
  • Track Vision Zero Violations at the Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas
  • Launch a High Visibility Enforcement Program on Priority Corridors
  • Launch a targeted Corridor Outreach Program
  • Launch a Driveway Safety program to address issues with vehicles crossing sidewalks
  • Conduct a comprehensive study of senior pedestrian injuries
  • Collaborate with the Business Integrity Commission to improve the safety of commercial waste fleets
Continuing Actions (From the 2015 Vision Zero Borough Pedestrian Action Plans)
  • Implement at least 50 Vision Zero safety engineering improvements annually on the updated Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas citywide
  • Add exclusive pedestrian crossing time to all feasible new Priority Intersections by the end of 2019
  • Prioritize targeted enforcement on Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas annually
  • Expand a bicycle network that improves safety for all road users
  • Install expanded speed limit signage on all new Priority Corridors in 2019
  • Target child and senior safety education at Priority Corridors and Priority Areas
  • Coordinate with MTA to ensure bus operations contribute to a safe pedestrian environment

A Five Borough Approach

In each borough, heat maps were created to highlight locations with the highest density of pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries. These maps were then used to create borough Priority Maps. Both maps were built on borough crash data, rather than citywide data. Since each borough has a different overall number and density of pedestrian crashes, each borough map is drawn at a different scale. For example, the "red" we observe in the Staten Island maps represents far fewer crashes than the "red" in the Manhattan maps. DOT and NYPD are tasked with addressing road safety for all residents in all boroughs, so creating five separate action plans was the most practical way to develop a robust set of focused, effective actions for each borough.

Download the original 2015 Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans (pdf):

Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island