Pedestrians

Vision Zero Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans

                 
      

Summary

Vision Zero seeks to eliminate all deaths from traffic crashes regardless of whether on foot, bicycle, or inside a motor vehicle. The Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans are one of 63 Vision Zero initiatives advancing that goal for all street users. Despite aggressive pedestrian-oriented street re-engineering between 2007 and 2013, citywide pedestrian fatalities have not declined. In fact, they increased in 2012 and 2013 while fatalities to other street users fell. Comparing the periods of 2005-2007 to 2011-2013, pedestrian fatalities actually rose by 2% while fatalities to all other users fell by 24%. At the same time, the pedestrian share of overall fatalities rose from 51% to 58%. Nationwide, pedestrians make up just 14% of all traffic fatalities. In Manhattan, pedestrians are 73% of all fatalities. .

In an effort to drive these fatalities down, DOT and NYPD developed a set of five plans, each of which analyzes the unique conditions of one New York City borough and recommends actions to address the borough’s specific challenges to pedestrian safety. These plans pinpoint the conditions and characteristics of pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries; they also identify corridors, intersections, and areas that disproportionately account for pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries, prioritizing them for safety interventions. Each Borough Plan was shaped by the community input from nine Vision Zero Pedestrian Safety Workshops held across the five boroughs and thousands of comments collected through the interactive Vision Zero Input map. Finally, these plans recommend a series of actions that intend to alter the physical and behavioral conditions on city streets that lead to pedestrian fatality and injury.

Download the Borough Pedestrian Safety Action Plans (pdf):

Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Staten Island

Download executive summaries of the plans (pdf):

Bronx: Executive Summary (Translations available: Traditional Chinese, Russian, and Spanish) Brooklyn: Executive Summary (Translations available: Traditional Chinese, Russian, and Spanish) Manhattan: Executive Summary (Translations available: Traditional Chinese, Russian, and Spanish) Queens: Executive Summary (Translations available: Traditional Chinese, Russian, and Spanish) Staten Island: Executive Summary (Translations available: Traditional Chinese, Russian, and Spanish)

Read letters about the plans (pdf)

from Mayor de Blasio and the Commissioners of DOT and NYPD.

Community Dialogue and Input:

  • 11,899 pedestrian safety issues were shared and mapped digitally
  • Most issues cited on the map involve either speeding (21%) or failure to yield (21%)
  • 69% of workshop attendees viewed wide arterial streets as the most important areas for pedestrian safety improvements

Action Plan Highlights:

Engineering and Planning:

  • Implement at least 50 Vision Zero safety engineering improvements annually at Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas citywide, informed by community input at project locations
  • Significantly expand exclusive pedestrian crossing time on all Priority Corridors by the end of 2017
  • Add exclusive pedestrian crossing time to all feasible Priority Intersections by the end of 2017
  • Modify signal timing to reduce off-peak speeding on all feasible Priority Corridors by the end of 2017
  • Install expanded speed limit signage on all Priority Corridors in 2015
  • Drive community input and engagement at Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas
  • Coordinate with MTA to ensure bus operations contribute to a safe pedestrian environment
  • Expand a bicycle network that improves safety for all road users
  • Proactively design for pedestrian safety in high-growth areas including locations in the Housing New York plan

Enforcement:

  • Implement the majority of speed camera locations at Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas
  • Concentrate targeted enforcement at all Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas annually
  • Focus enforcement and deploy dedicated resources to NYPD precincts that overlap substantially with Priority Areas

Education and Awareness Campaigns:

  • Target safety education at Priority Corridors and Priority Areas
  • Target Street Team outreach at Priority Corridors, Intersections, and Areas

A Five Borough Approach:

In each borough, heat maps were created to highlight locations with the highest density of pedestrian fatalities and severe injuries. These maps were then used to create borough Priority Maps. Both maps were built on borough crash data, rather than citywide data. Since each borough has a different overall number and density of pedestrian crashes, each borough map is drawn at a different scale. For example, the "red" we observe in the Staten Island maps represents far fewer crashes than the "red" in the Manhattan maps. DOT and NYPD are tasked with addressing road safety for all residents in all boroughs, so creating five separate action plans was the most practical way to develop a robust set of focused, effective actions for each borough.