Motorists & Parking

Citywide Congested Corridors Project

The Citywide Congested Corridors Project is a planning study of fourteen busy roadways across five boroughs, with the goals of improving mobility, air quality, safety, and the quality of life for all of the street's users, as described in PlaNYC. The study will be consistent with the City's goal of building complete streets that accommodate the needs of all street users including pedestrians, bicyclists, transit users and motorists, all of whom contribute to the livability and economic vibrancy of the areas. The project seeks to not only study these corridors, but also to implement the resulting recommendations to ensure that congestion is reduced and quality of life is improved.

Study Goals and Objectives

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  • Identify the existing and future travel characteristics of the corridor, and those impacts on the community
  • Engage the public and community groups in identifying users and demands for the roadway space, as well as building consensus on potential solutions
  • Improve safety and mobility for pedestrians, cyclists, transit users and motorists
  • Improve air quality and reduce vehicular emissions as part of the City's goal to reduce its carbon footprint
  • Reduce the time needed to travel to and within the corridor.
  • Ensure that the transportation system is serving the larger goals of mobility, economic development, quality of life, and environmental sustainability.

Study Process

  • DOT will use consultants to perform a comprehensive study of transportation conditions along the selected corridors and adjacent areas.
  • Public outreach will occur at multiple points throughout the study, both in determining existing issues, and in developing and evaluating potential improvements
  • Detailed data will be assembled and collected on:
    • Land use and zoning
    • Demographics
    • Traffic, pedestrian and bicycle volumes and movements
    • Transit service, including ridership data and intermodal connections
    • Goods movement and deliveries
    • Parking issues
    • Safety issues
  • The study will examine both existing and future transportation conditions
  • Recommendations for corridor improvements will be developed by the consultant and DOT, along with community input
  • The City will implement the recommendations from the study

Studies In Progress

The following corridors will be studied as part of this program.

Future Study Areas

  • 14th Street in Manhattan from FDR Drive to the West Side Highway
  • Broadway in Brooklyn from the Williamsburg Bridge to East New York Avenue
  • East Gun Hill Road in the Bronx from Jerome Avenue to White Plains Road
  • Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn from Nostrand Avenue to Empire Boulevard - Start
  • Fordham Road in the Bronx from the Major Deegan Expressway to Southern Boulevard
  • Liberty Avenue in Queens from Woodhaven Boulevard to Van Wyck Expressway
  • Nostrand Avenue in Brooklyn from Atlantic Avenue to Emmons Avenue
  • Northern Boulevard in Queens from Queens Plaza to the Brooklyn Queens Expressway
  • West 96th Street in Manhattan from Central Park West to Riverside Drive

The Bronx

East Gun Hill Road from Jerome Avenue to White Plains Road (0.85 miles)

This section of East Gun Hill Road, between White Plains Road and Jerome Avenue, lies north of the New York Botanical Gardens and south of the Woodlawn cemetery. Montefiore Medical Center lies just east of Jerome Avenue on this corridor. East Gun Hill Road is a major connector to the Bronx River Parkway in the east and the Mosholu Parkway in the west. The corridor is characterized by a mix of upper-floor residential with ground level retail land uses.

East Gun Hill Road is a designated local truck route from Broadway in the west to the New England Throughway in the east. There is an elevated 2/5 subway station at White Plains Road, and a 4 train station at Jerome Avenue. The Williams Bridge Metro North station is located just west of the Bronx River Parkway entrance/exit. The BX10, BX28, BX30, BX41 and BX55 bus routes all operate along a portion of the study corridor.

Fordham Road from the Major Deegan Expressway to Southern Boulevard (2.5 Miles)

This 2.5 mile long east-west corridor begins at the western border of the Bronx Park. It runs through the western half of the Bronx and covers East and West Fordham Road. Fordham Road is characterized by a mix of residential and commercial land uses and is a designated local truck route and a planned corridor for the Bus Rapid Transit Project.

Transit characteristics include the operation of the following MTA-NYCT buses: Bx9, Bx12, Bx17 and Bx22. Fordham Road is also the southernmost point in services provided by the Westchester B-Line transit system and the BL60, BL61, BL62 and BL90. Notable locations of connections with rail transit lines include Jerome Avenue with the No. 4 subway and on Grand Concourse with the B and D trains. Major facilities on the eastern section of this corridor include the Bronx Zoo and Fordham University, both of which are major traffic generators. Overall, the major challenge along this corridor is to balance pedestrian and vehicular needs on this crowded roadway.

Brooklyn

Flatbush Avenue from Nostrand Avenue to Empire Boulevard (2.3 miles)

The section of Flatbush Avenue to be studied runs north-south through the middle of Brooklyn. Flatbush Avenue is a major connector to the Belt Parkway, Kings Highway, and the Rockaways south of the study corridor and Prospect Park, Downtown Brooklyn, and the Manhattan Bridge north of the study corridor. It is characterized by a mix of heavy local retail, residential and institutional uses. There are high pedestrian volumes along the entire corridor and particularly at the southern end where Brooklyn College is located and at the major intersection with Nostrand Avenue known as the Junction. A new Target retail store is also under development at the Junction.

Flatbush Avenue is a designated local truck route between Empire Boulevard and Church Avenue; south of Church Avenue it becomes a through truck route. It is served by numerous subway routes and bus lines, and also commuter van service along the corridor.

Nostrand Avenue from Atlantic Avenue to Emmons Avenue (3.4 miles)

The Nostrand Avenue corridor runs north-south and reaches the southern tip of Brooklyn at Emmons Avenue. It is characterized by a mix of residential and commercial land uses. There are high pedestrian volumes at many points along and particularly at the intersection with Flatbush Avenue where Brooklyn College is located and where new retail development is occurring.

Nostrand Avenue is a truck route from Atlantic Avenue to the Junction with Flatbush Avenue. It is served by numerous subway routes and bus lines, including planned Select Bus Service.

Broadway from the Williamsburg Bridge to East New York Avenue (3.9 miles)

Broadway in Brooklyn leads directly to the Williamsburg Bridge to Manhattan and is a major connector to the Brooklyn Queens Expressway in the west and the Jackie Robinson Parkway in the east. The corridor is characterized by traditional storefronts, constrained street widths and light to moderate pedestrian volumes. Woodhull Hospital is also along the corridor.

The entire length of the study area is a designated local truck route. It is a heavily used bus and subway corridor.

White Plains Road

White Plains Road
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White Plains Road is a north-south road that runs parallel to the Bronx River Parkway on the eastern side of the Bronx Park. The surrounding neighborhood is characterized by a mix of residential and commercial land uses. White Plains Road carries elevated subway tracks for MTA's No. 2 and 5 lines and columns supporting the elevated tracks separate each side of the roadway into a narrow inside travel lane and a very narrow outside travel lane with a parking lane. The outside travel lane is perceived as an ineffective travel lane due to its narrowness and double parking activities. There are four NYC Transit bus routes (Bx8, Bx22, Bx39, and Bx41) serving the study corridor. White Plains Road is a designated local truck route from the Bruckner Expressway in the south through East 233rd Street in the north to the City boundary line. Due to significant residential and commercial activities, this corridor experiences a steady flow of traffic with minimal variation between AM and PM peak period traffic demand. The constrained right-of-way and the resulting congestion from high vehicular volume create challenges for meeting mobility needs for the various users. Download the presentation (pdf) for the Project Advisory Committee Meeting (March 2008). Contains background information, initial observations and next steps. Download the public meeting presentation (June 2008) which contains background information, initial observations and next steps. Download the project update presentation (November 2009).

Manhattan

14th Street from FDR Drive to the West Side Highway (2.2 miles)

Fourteenth Street in Manhattan is a major crosstown route characterized by a mix of heavy retail and residential land uses. The center of the corridor functions as the lower boundary of the Midtown CBD, while the east and west sides serve very dense residential development, as well as parks and plazas.

From First Avenue to the West Side Highway, 14th Street is a designated local truck route. Union Square is a major pedestrian generator and a destination for the N, Q, R, W, L, 4, 5 and 6 subway lines. The 1, 2, 3, A, C, E, F and V lines also have stops on 14th Street and there is PATH access at Sixth Avenue. The L train provides crosstown service under 14th street with stops at First Avenue, Third Avenue, Union Square, Sixth Avenue and Eighth Avenue. The M14A, M14D, M11, M9 and M7 bus routes all operate along some portion of 14th Street. Crosstown bus speeds are cause for concern here.

West 96th Street from Central Park West to Riverside Drive (1.1 miles)

West 96th Street is a major crosstown street serving as a connection to the Henry Hudson Parkway. It is mostly a dense residential corridor, with major retail concentrations where it intersects the north-south avenues. The corridor serves a large amount of through traffic, due to its connections to both a Central Park Transverse Roadway, and the parkway.

The corridor is a local truck route from Central Park to Broadway. The area is served by the 1, 2, 3, B, and C subway lines and the M96 and M106 bus routes. The area around Broadway in particular has very high pedestrian volumes and crossing, due in part to the express subway station located there. The entryway to that station is proposed to be rebuilt in the next couple of years.

West 181st Street

West 181st street
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This east-west corridor is a busy retail street that provides connections to the Washington Bridge, I-95 and Harlem River Drive in the east and Riverside Drive and the Henry Hudson Parkway in the west. It has one travel lane and one parking lane in each direction. The corridor is characterized by mixed land use including retail, institutional and high density residential.

181st Street is a local truck route and is served by subway stations along the 1 and A lines and sees a large volume of bus traffic by the Bx3, Bx11 Bx13, Bx35 and Bx36 bus routes connecting the Bronx and Manhattan. Drawn by the retail and transit concentration, pedestrian volumes are also very high along the corridor. The George Washington Bridge and Bus Terminal and the Alexander Hamilton Bridge are immediately to the south of the corridor and generate a considerable volume of vehicular traffic. The level of activity along the corridor has generated concerns about congestion and safety. Download the public meeting presentation, which contains background information, initial observations and next steps. Download the presentation for the Project Advisory Committee Meeting (June 2008). Contains background information, initial observations and next steps. Download the presentation for the Project Advisory Committee Meeting (June 2010). Download the presentation given to the Transportation Committee of Community Board 12 (June 2011) Download the final report (July 2012, pdf)

Queens

Liberty Avenue

Liberty Avenue
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This section of Liberty Avenue, from Woodhaven Boulevard to the Van Wyck Expressway, runs east-west through the Ozone Park and South Richmond Hill neighborhoods of Queens. Beyond the study area, Liberty Avenue continues east to Jamaica Center, and west to Brooklyn. Along most of the study area, the elevated structure of the A subway line dominated the avenue. There are stations at Rockaway Boulevard/96th Street, 103rd Street, 111th Street and Lefferts Boulevard, where the line ends. The corridor is served by MTA bus route Q112, and is intersected by routes Q7, Q9, Q10, Q11, Q21, Q37, Q41 (at two locations) and Q53, and by express routes QM 15, QM 18 and X64. At the eastern end of the section DOT is studying, ramps lead on and off the Van Wyck Expressway. The avenue is a lined by storefronts and busy with pedestrians, especially around Lefferts Boulevard. The road has one travel lane and one parking lane in each direction, so it is easily affected by double parking, typically by commercial vehicles.

There are 27 signalized and 23 unsignalized intersections along the stretch of Liberty Avenue to be studied. Almost all the north-south streets that intersect this section of Liberty Avenue are single-lane one-way residential streets. The exceptions are 111th Street, Lefferts Boulevard, the north leg of 123rd Street and the south legs of 133rd and 134th Streets, which are two-way, and the north legs of 120th, 121st and 124th Streets, which, though one-way, are wider than the other one-way north-south streets. The north-south streets from 106th street to 110th Street are offset on either side of Liberty Avenue, causing safety and mobility issues for vehicles traveling through on those streets. The same condition exists, to varying degrees, for most of the north-south streets east of Lefferts Boulevard. Download a presentation (pdf) on the Liberty Avenue Corridor

Northern Boulevard from Queens Plaza to the Brooklyn Queens Expressway (2.2 miles)

This corridor runs east-west route in northern Queens and provides a major connection to the Queensboro Bridge. The corridor has direct access to the Brooklyn-Queens Expressway in the east, a location that has undergone a massive reconstruction, and to the Manhattan CBD by way of the Queensboro Bridge in the west. The reconstruction of the BQE has resulted in a change in traffic patterns at the intersection, especially for motorists wishing to access the expressway toward Brooklyn.

Northern Boulevard is a wide corridor with significant auto-related and large, stand-alone commercial retail stores. There are light pedestrian volumes and some residential land uses. The corridor is also a through truck route. There are three subway stops along this portion of Northern Boulevard where the R, V and G trains can be accessed and an N/W station one block away on 39th Ave. The Q101 and Q66 bus routes operate along a portion of the study corridor.

Woodhaven Boulevard

Woodhaven Blvd
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Woodhaven Boulevard is a wide north-south road that runs from Queens Boulevard to the Liberty Avenue / Rockaway Boulevard intersection. At this point, continuing south, Woodhaven Boulevard becomes Cross Bay Boulevard, and connects to the Rockaways. The boulevard has a variety of land uses, including the Queens Center mall and other big box retail, as well as dense residential development and parks, and stretches with more neighborhood-oriented retail. The road has a very wide cross section, with as many as four travel lanes in the main roadway, and 3 lanes on the service roadway in each direction. At major intersections, only the service roadway meets the cross street, while the main roadway utilizes a flyover. The corridor crosses many major roads, including the Long Island Expressway, the Jackie Robinson Parkway, and Atlantic Avenue.

The entire length of Woodhaven Boulevard is a local truck route. The R, V and G subway lines are accessible from Queens Boulevard at Woodhaven Boulevard, and the Q11, Q29, Q53, Q38, Q59 bus lines use at least a portion of the route, with high ridership. The J and Z subway lines are accessible at Jamaica Avenue, and the A train has a station at Liberty Avenue. Pedestrian volumes vary greatly along the corridor, from very large numbers near the Queens Center mall, to sparser conditions in areas without much neighborhood retail. Download the public meeting presentation (pdf) which contains background information, initial observations and next steps. Download the project update from the September 2009 public meeting. Download the project update from the June 2010 public meeting, along with a poster of alternative designs proposed for the corridor.

Staten Island

Amboy Road from Arden Avenue to Clarke Avenue

Amboy Road Map
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Amboy Road is a major arterial that traverses Staten Island's south-eastern quadrant on a north-south axis. It is typically characterized by narrow and often curvaceous single lanes in each direction. Land use and development varies along the corridor, changing from low to medium density residential developments to suburban style strip malls, mixed use areas and undeveloped tracts. Additionally, there are numerous community facilities, such as schools and places of worship that are trip generators. These development characteristics, coupled with the physical constraints of the roadway and travel patterns on Staten Island generate vehicular traffic of all types on Amboy Road at various times of the day. These include deliveries, local shopping, and cross-island trips. Download the presentation for the Project Advisory Committee Meeting (February 2008). Contains background information, initial observations and next steps. Download the recommendations for short and long term improvements (May 2009).