News & Awards: Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 8, 2013
No. 006
www.nyc.gov 

NEW YORK CITY FELONY CRIME DATA DEPICTED FOR FIRST TIME ON INTERACTIVE MAP

Website Displays Neighborhood Crime Data by Category, Location and Rate Per 1,000 Residents

The City of New York today debuted an interactive crime map that enables the public to search and access basic data on felony crime occurrences by location. Accessible at maps.nyc.gov/crime, the website provides felony crime information for the prior calendar year, current year and by month within the current year. Its launch fulfills Local Law 39 of 2013, which mandates the publication of an interactive crime mapping website. The map was built by the Department of Information Technology and Telecommunications (DoITT) using Google products with crime complainant data as reported to the NYPD. Crime statistics by precinct have been available on the Police Department's website since 2003 and are updated weekly at http://www.nyc.gov/html/nypd/html/crime_prevention/crime_statistics.shtml.

New York City Police Commissioner Raymond W. Kelly said: “With unprecedented population levels, New York City is safer than ever, with homicides on pace this year to fall below recent historic lows. This administration has relied on data to drive its crime fighting, and this map helps enhance New Yorkers’ and researchers’ understanding of where felony and violent crime persists.”

Chief Information and Innovation Officer Rahul N. Merchant said: “DoITT employs innovative technology to improve the accessibility of critical public information. The interactive crime map builds on report data and presents it visually in neighborhoods across the five boroughs, keeping the public informed about what is going on in their community.”

The public can search basic data on felony crime occurrence by address, zip code, or police precinct. The map displays crimes at the nearest street segment or intersection to the report location. Filters for specific crime type display the results by select year or month in one of three ways: precinct level, showing crime incidents per 1000 residents as a shaded map (chloropleth); graduated points which correspond to the number of crimes at a given location; or as a "heat map” that marks crimes by concentration in the selected area.

The crime data reported in the map represents the seven major felony crimes as defined by the New York State Penal Law.

 

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Contact:

Lara Torvi (DoITT) (646) 769-2296

John J. McCarthy (NYPD) (646) 610-6700