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Information for Building Owners and Contractors

Dust from lead paint is the most common cause of childhood lead poisoning. New York City banned lead paint for residential use in 1960. Even so, older buildings may still have lead paint on walls, windows, doors, and other surfaces. New York City's Local Law 1 of 2004 requires landlords to address lead paint hazards by investigating their property for any conditions that may cause peeling paint and safely making repairs.

NYC’s Primary Prevention of Lead Poisoning in Housing Law (Local Law 1 of 2004)

Local law 1 applies to New York City apartments in buildings built before 1960 (or between 1960 and 1978 if the owners knows that the building has lead paint) with 3 or more apartments and a child under the age of 6 lives in the apartment. If buildings covered by Local Law 1, building owners must:

  • Find out if any children younger than age 6 live in the building and inspect those apartments for lead paint hazards every year
  • Use lead safe work practices and trained workers when fixing lead paint hazards and when doing general repair work that disturbs lead paint
  • Hire firms certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) when disturbing more than 100 square feet of lead paint, replacing windows, or fixing violations issued by the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD)
  • Repair lead paint hazards before a new tenant moves into an apartment
  • Keep records of all notices, inspections, repairs of lead paint hazards, and other matters related to the law.
  • Give a copy of the clearance dust wipe results to the tenant after the post-work clean-up is completed
Lead-Safe Work Methods

Building owners must use safe work practices and trained workers to fix lead paint hazards and when doing general repair work that disturbs lead paint.  Safe work practices include:

  • Never dry scrape or dry sand lead paint
  • Post warning signs around the work area
  • Tell tenants to stay out of the work area
  • Clean the work area with wet mops and HEPA vacuums every day and after the work is done
  • Remove all items that can be moved from the work area
  • Cover furniture that cannot be moved
  • Seal floors, doors, and other openings with plastic and waterproof tape
  • Hire a professional to check lead dust levels after the clean-up is completed

While repair work is happening, building owners must make sure trained workers clean the work area every day with wet mops and HEPA vacuums. For more information on lead safe work methods, call 311.

Federal Regulations:  The EPA “Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule” took effect on April 22, 2010. To learn more about this rule, you can check the EPA website. You can also call the EPA at 732-321-6671 for more information. You must still comply with all NYC local requirements including Local Law 1 of 2004 and all pertinent Health Code requirements..  Sign up for a free training class on RRP and Local Law 1.

Fax commencement of work and submitting lead dust sample reports to: 347-396-8926

 

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