City Health Information
Volume 32 (2013) New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene No. 3; 11-18
 

IN THIS ISSUE

 

Influenza Prevention and Control, 2013-2014
  • Vaccinate everyone aged 6 months and older against influenza as early as possible.
  • Give inactivated vaccine to all pregnant women in any trimester.
  • Get your flu vaccination as soon as vaccine becomes available and ensure that your staff does the same.

 

SUMMARY

Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent influenza and its serious complications, such as pneumococcal disease. Recommending and offering vaccine at every patient visit is the most effective way to ensure that your patients are protected. New influenza vaccine formulations are available this season that may offer your patients better protection, including quadrivalent vaccines that protect against 2 B virus strains. New options are also available for patients with allergy to egg protein.

Everyone aged 6 months and older should be vaccinated against influenza, especially people in high-risk groups, including infants and young children, pregnant women, older adults, and patients of any age who have chronic medical conditions or are immunocompromised, and their close contacts. Children in day care and school are a major source of influenza infection and should be vaccinated early, preferably as soon as vaccine becomes available, to reduce community transmission. All health care workers should be vaccinated as early as possible to reduce their own risk of infection and prevent the spread of influenza to their patients, colleagues, and families. New York State now requires Article 28, 36, and 40 health care and residential facilities and agencies to report the vaccination status of health care workers. Get your flu vaccination as soon as vaccine becomes available and ensure that your staff does the same.

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