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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 15-17

March 25, 2015

Contact:

deppressoffice@dep.nyc.gov, (845) 334-7868

Department of Environmental Protection Encourages Anglers to Use Expanded Access to Reservoirs, Streams and Creeks as Trout Fishing Season Begins

The New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) today reminded anglers that its upstate reservoirs and dozens of properties along creeks and streams will be open for fishing when trout season begins April 1. Twenty-two reservoirs and lakes, covering roughly 36,000 acres, will be open for fishing from shore or from boats that have a valid DEP boat tag. Most of these reservoirs and lakes include habitat for cold-water species such as trout and warm-water species such as smallmouth and largemouth bass. New York’s trout season generally runs until Oct. 15. However, the trout fishing season on certain New York City reservoirs is open year-round or closes later than Oct. 15. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation outlines statewide fishing regulations, including information on licenses, catch limits, and stocking, on its website.

“New York City’s reservoirs and the streams and creeks that feed them offer some of the best fishing in the world,” DEP Commissioner Emily Lloyd said. “In recent years, DEP has improved access and expanded programs for recreation at our reservoirs and the upstream tributaries that have long been celebrated for excellent trout fishing. As anglers prepare for the first cast of the season, we encourage them to take advantage of these opportunities throughout the watershed.”

DEP this year has distributed a fishing brochure to help guide anglers through the process of getting their free DEP access permit, and take certain precautions that help protect water quality and prevent the spread of invasive species. The brochure also includes valuable information about fishing conditions and fish species at each of the 22 reservoirs and lakes. (See the table below.) The brochure, along with angler maps, can be found at the DEP website by clicking here. 2015 also marks the third year that state-certified outdoor guides are permitted to offer their services—including guided fishing trips—on water supply reservoirs and lands. A list of certified guides that are approved for the program on water supply lands and waters can be found by clicking here.

In addition to its reservoirs and lakes, New York City also owns protected land in the watersheds that include roughly 210 miles of frontage along rivers, streams and creeks that are suitable for trout fishing. Some open parcels that offer excellent trout fishing include:

Delaware County

  • Spring Valley Recreation Unit in the Town of Meredith includes a 12.5-acre pond that’s ideal for fishing. Access is off Waterman Road.
  • Weaver Hollow Recreation Unit in the Town of Andes includes 3,000 feet of frontage along unnamed stream. Access is over Weaver Hollow Road.
  • Bryants Brook Recreation Unit, also in Andes, includes more than 3,000 feet of frontage along Bryants Brook, located off State Route 28.
  • Mallory Brook Recreation Unit in the Town of Hamden includes more than 800 feet of frontage along the Mallory Brook. Access is located off County Route 26.
  • River Road Recreation Unit in the Town of Walton includes more than 2,000 feet of frontage on the West Branch Delaware River. Access is off East River Road.
  • Carey Road Recreation Unit in the Town of Delhi includes more than 5,000 feet of frontage on the Little Delaware. Access is located off State Route 28.
  • The Bloomville Recreation Unit in the Town of Stamford includes more than 3,000 feet of frontage along the West Branch Delaware River. Access is off County Route 18.

Greene County

  • Railroad Bend Recreation Unit in the Town of Hunter includes more than 3,400 feet of frontage along the Schoharie Creek. Access is located off County Route 83.
  • Batavia Recreational Unit in the Town of Ashland includes more than 3,000 feet of frontage on the Batavia Kill. Access is located off State Route 23.

Putnam County

  • Boyd Corners South Recreation Unit in the Town of Kent includes more than 2,200 feet of frontage along the West Branch Croton River. Access is on State Route 301. A valid DEP Access Permit is required for this site.
  • Dean Pond Recreation Unit, also in Kent, includes more than 4,000 feet of frontage along the Horsepound Brook. Access is located off Horse Pound Road. A valid DEP Access Permit is required for this site.

Sullivan County

  • North Side Recreation Unit in the Town of Neversink includes a half mile of frontage along the Rondout Creek. Access is along Sundown Road.

Ulster County

  • Trout Creek Recreation Unit in the Town of Wawarsing includes more than 1.5 miles of stream frontage along the Trout Creek. Access is located off Yagerville Road.
  • Woodland Valley Recreation Unit in the Town of Shandaken includes 900 feet of frontage along the Woodland Creek. Access is along Woodland Valley Road.

Maps of these recreation units and others where fishing is available can be found on the DEP website by clicking here. Fishing on all city-owned reservoirs and lakes, along with some of the recreation units listed above, requires a free DEP Access Permit. An access permit can be obtained through DEP’s online permitting system, found at www.nyc.gov/dep/accesspermit. Those with questions about permitting may also email recreation@dep.nyc.gov or call (800) 575-LAND. Those fishing on streams that run across water supply lands should carefully check signs in those recreation units to determine whether a permit is required.

In addition, fishermen should be aware that boats are not allowed on DEP reservoirs and lakes until they are free of ice. With only seven days until the start of trout season, most reservoirs in the water supply system remain covered in thick ice because of this winter’s extremely low temperatures.

The breadth of fishing opportunities on City reservoirs and land underscores DEP’s effort to support the recreation and tourism economies in the watershed by opening more properties to recreation. There are currently more than 126,000 acres of City property open for recreation in the watersheds, including the reservoirs. Of that, 63,769 acres are public access areas that can be used without a permit for fishing, hiking, snowshoeing and other forms of low-impact recreation.

DEP manages New York City’s water supply, providing more than one billion gallons of high quality water each day to more than 9 million New Yorkers. This includes more than 70 upstate communities and institutions in Ulster, Orange, Putnam and Westchester counties who consume an average of 110 million total gallons of drinking water daily from New York City’s water supply system. This water comes from the Catskill, Delaware, and Croton watersheds that extend more than 125 miles from the City, and the system comprises 19 reservoirs, three controlled lakes, and numerous tunnels and aqueducts. DEP has nearly 6,000 employees, including almost 1,000 scientists, engineers, surveyors, watershed maintainers and other professionals in the upstate watershed. In addition to its $70 million payroll and $157 million in annual taxes paid in upstate counties, DEP has invested more than $1.7 billion in watershed protection programs—including partnership organizations such as the Catskill Watershed Corporation and the Watershed Agricultural Council—that support sustainable farming practices, environmentally sensitive economic development, and local economic opportunity. In addition, DEP has a robust capital program with nearly $14 billion in investments planned over the next 10 years that will create up to 3,000 construction-related jobs per year. For more information, visit nyc.gov/dep, like us on Facebook, or follow us on Twitter.

More Information

NYC Department of Environmental Protection
Public Affairs

59-17 Junction Boulevard
19th Floor
Flushing, NY 11373

(718) 595-6600