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The Newtown Creek Digester Eggs

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Among the most dramatic elements of Newtown Creek’s new plant are its eight futuristic, stainless steel-clad digester eggs.  Processing as much as 1.5 million gallons of sludge every day, the eggs are visible from vantage points in Brooklyn, Queens and Manhattan and serve as a landmark for travelers on several of the City’s highways and bridges.

Blending Form and Function
Digesters play a critical role in processing sludge, the organic material removed from sewage. Inside the digesters – given heat, lack of oxygen and time, bacteria break down the sludge into more stable materials. This natural process converts much of the sludge into water, carbon dioxide and methane gas, leaving what is called “digested sludge.” This material, in turn, is dewatered to form a cake, which, after additional processing, can be used as fertilizer.

Illuminating the Night Sky
At night, the digester eggs' dramatic lighting reminds all who see them of their elegant combination of engineering and art. Lighting designer Hervé Descottes used a layer of blue light to identify and unify the water treatment plant and to set it apart from the surrounding city.  He also used other lights as well. Bright white lights define the plant’s various functional areas, such as the loading docks, which blaze in contrast to the blue monochromatic field. Shimmering lines, some of them yellow, are used to demarcate pedestrian walkways and to contrast with the blue light.



Lighting Ceremony

Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant
The Newtown Creek plant, located in Green Point, Brooklyn, is the largest of New York City's 14 wastewater treatment plants.
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 Visitor Center

Visitor Center at Newtown Creek
The visitor center, designed by Vito Acconci, serves as a destination for school trips, and features installations describing how the city’s sewer system works.
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Newtown Creek Waterfront Nature Walk
The George Trakas–designed Waterfront Nature Walk provides the first public access to the Newtown Creek waterfront in decades.
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