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Dry Cleaning Information

A new regulation concerning chemicals used in the dry cleaning process was enacted last year which goes into effect on February 11th, 2014. The new rule requires dry cleaning establishments to post a sign which lists the primary chemicals used in their dry cleaning facility. The intention of the sign is to permit consumers to gain information about the composition and potential risks associated with their use by going to our website to look up those specific chemicals.

For Businesses That Are Using Perc (perchloroethylene) as their primary solvent

Dry cleaning establishments that use perc in their cleaning process will be required to post a sign (8 ½ x 11) that includes the name of the store, the manufacturer of the perc product (examples: Dow Chemical, Vulcan Chemicals), as well as their DEP air permit number and Right To Know ID number.

For Businesses That Are Using Chemicals Other Than Perc as their primary solvent

Dry Cleaning establishments using non-perc chemicals will be required to post a sign (8 ½ x11) that includes the name of the store; the primary chemical substance used in the cleaning process, as well as the DEP air permit number (if applicable), and any Right To Know (RTK) ID number if the facility files under the RTK Law.

Note: regarding non-perc cleaners, the signs only require the commercial brand name of the primary chemical used (examples: DF2000 Fluid; Green Earth SB-32).

If your dry cleaning process uses both perc and non-perc chemical methods you will be required to post both signs.

The required signs, in fillable form, may be downloaded here for printing:

New Rule Effective February 2014 and you can read it in its final form here:





Non-Perc MSDS
 
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Perc MSDS
 
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Dry cleaners

Perchloroethylene (Perc)
Perchloroethylene (perc) is a chemical used in the dry cleaning process that if ingested can adversely affect human health. DEP has promulgated rules and permitting requirements for dry cleaners in New York City and is working to limit exposure to perc throughout the city.
Learn more


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