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Sustainable Design

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Overview

As a result of research done for these pilot projects, DDC now requires the use of materials with recycled content for the following products: fly ash or blast furnace slag in concrete products, steel, engineered wood, fireproofing, insulation, gypsum board, ceramic tile, ceiling tiles and panels, carpet, rubber flooring and plastic toilet partitions. The NYC Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Laws of 2005 have reinforced these DDC experiences by highlighting sustainable products and requiring their use in City building and renovation projects. Construction and demolition waste recycling has been very successful on DDC projects, despite the limited availability of site staging areas – up to 90% – because nearby waste processors have developed sophisticated sorting facilities to accept mixed waste from urban projects.

 
Bronx County Hall of Justice
Design commenced 1995

Daylight maximized
to 95% of rooms,
including courtrooms
Daylight carefully
controlled for comfort,
privacy, security
Optimized fresh air
quantities
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde

Air intakes located
near roof, away from
street-level pollutants
Daylighting uses
narrow plan
organization, insulated
glazing, clerestories,
light shelves
Glazing with varying
levels of transparency,
depending on usage
CO2 monitors
control fresh air in
courtrooms and jury
spaces
Specifications for
low-emitting paints
and other products
Separate ventilation
for interior service
areas
Expansive glazing,
operable windows and
occupant controls for
thermal comfort

ACS Children's Center
Design commenced 1998

Optimized fresh air
quantities
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Daylight maximized
for all occupants
Views outside
maintained
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating, and cooling
Building systems
and occupants
protected from
construction
contamination

CO2 monitors
control fresh air
Air intakes located
at roof – away from
street-level pollutants
Added light shelves
to existing tall
windows to bring d
aylight deeper into the
space
Floor layout kept
open; open work
areas at windows and
enclosed offices at
interior with borrowed
lights
Air quality
management during
construction
Specifications for
low-emitting paints,
flooring, adhesives,
sealants, cementitious
spray insulation
Materials that easily
absorb contaminants
avoided in children’s
areas, e.g. carpet
Separate ventilation
for interior service
areas
Expansive glazing,
operable windows and
occupant controls for
thermal comfort

Queens Botanical Garden
Design commenced in 1999

Optimized fresh air
quantities
Building systems
and occupants
protected from
construction
contaminants
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Daylight to 78% of
rooms, and views of
90%
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating and cooling

CO2 monitors
control fresh air
Air quality
management during
construction
Specifications for
low-emitting paints,
carpets, adhesives,
sealants, non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Separate ventilation
for interior service
areas
Expansive glazing,
operable windows,
and occupant controls
for thermal comfort

George R Vierno Center Dormitory
Design commenced 1999

Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
and urea formaldehyde
Daylight maximized
Views outside
maximized
Natural light to all
regularly occupied
spaces

Specifications for
low-emitting paints,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Borrowed lights in
all detainee areas and
office areas

Williamsburg Daycare Center
Design commenced 1999

Daylight maximized
and views outside
captured
Optimized fresh air
quantities
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating and cooling

Light well to bring
in natural light to
interior hallway and
offices
Light shelves and
reflective surfaces
increase daylight
penetration
Specifications for
low-emitting paints,
carpets, adhesives,
sealants, non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Separate ventilation
for interior services
areas, walk-off grilles
Operable windows
and occupant controls
for thermal comfort

NY Hall of Science:
Design commenced 2000

Daylight maximized
to exhibit areas and
enclosed offices
Views outside for
regular occupied
personnel space
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating, and cooling

Diffused natural
light from translucent,
insulated fiberglass
panel system for walls
and roof
Expansive glazing,
operable windows and
occupant controls for
thermal comfort

Carl F Kauffeld House of Reptiles:
Design commenced 2000

Environment
optimized for reptiles,
visitors, and keepers
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Daylight maximized
where appropriate
Building systems
and occupants
protected from
construction
contamination

Separate systems
and controls for each
use area
Keeper’s work
area with operable
windows, natural
ventilation
Specifications for
low-emitting paints,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods

Kensington Branch Library:
Design commenced 2001

Controlled daylight
maximized; views
outside maximized
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating, and cooling
Building systems
and occupants
protected from
construction
contamination
Sound from HVAC
components
controlled

Expansive low-
emissivity glazing,
controlled from glare –
atrium skylights with
louver-controlled sun
filters, clear north-
facing windows, light
shelves/fritted glass on
the east, deep-set
south facing windows
Natural ventilation;
air intakes remote
from street traffic
Low-emitting
paints, adhesives,
sealants non-urea-
formaldehyde wheat-
board
Separate ventilation
for interior areas;
walk-off grilles
Air quality
management during
construction planned
AC units mounted
on roof curbs; sound
attenuators in
ductwork

Lion House Conservation:
Design commenced 2002

Optimized fresh air
quantities
Extensive
daylighting, including
ultra-violet light
required for animals
Building systems
and occupants
protected from
construction
contamination
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
and urea
formaldehyde
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating, and cooling

CO2 monitors
control fresh air
delivery
HVAC systems
designed to deliver
100% outside air
Low-velocity
under-floor air
distribution system
Exhibit areas with
UV transmitting
skylights, and Low-E
skylights elsewhere
Air quality
management during
construction required;
flush-out before
occupancy required
Low-emitting
paints, carpets,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods

New Sunrise Yard:
Design commenced 2003

Optimized fresh air
quantities
Daylight maximized
to 98% of rooms
Shops shielded
from sun glare
Views outside
maximized to 96% of
rooms
Protection of
building systems and
occupants from
construction
contamination
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Occupant-
controlled lighting,
heating, cooling, and
ventilation

Natural ventilation,
controlled
automatically and by
user
Air quality
management during
construction required,
including flush-out
Low-emitting
paints, carpets,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Separate ventilation
by use, walk-off grilles
between functions
Expansive glazing,
primarily north-facing,
diffused, shaded, or
otherwise controlled
Operable windows
and occupant controls
for thermal comfort

Brooklyn Children’s Museum:
Design commenced 2004

Optimized fresh air
quantities
Protection of
building systems and
occupants from
construction
contamination
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Daylight maximized
to all public areas
Acoustics
improved

CO2 monitors
control fresh air
Air quality
management during
construction; pre-
occupancy flush-out
planned
Low-emitting
paints, carpets,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Separate ventilation
for interior service
areas
Geothermal system
eliminated noise-
producing equipment
from roof

Office of Emergency Management:
Design commenced 2004

Optimized fresh air
quantities
Protected building
systems and
occupants from
construction
contamination
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde

CO2 monitors
control fresh air
Air quality
management during
construction
Specifications for
low-emitting paints,
carpets, adhesives,
sealants, non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Separate ventilation
for interior service
areas, walk-off grilles
at entrances
Building flush-out
prior to occupancy
Integrated pest
management program
established

Glen Oaks Branch Library:
Design commenced 2005

Daylight is
maximized to more
than 75% of rooms,
including below-grade
spaces
Optimized fresh air
quantities
Building systems
and occupants
protected from
construction
contamination
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Occupant comfort
enhanced

Daylight brought
into the building
through a variety of
devices – view
windows, monitors,
and skylights. Direct
sun diffused by
graphic films, channel
glass, and skylight
shaping
CO2 monitors
control fresh air
Winter
humidification included
Permanent
monitoring system for
temperature and
humidity
Air quality
management during
construction; flush-out
planned
Low-emitting
paints, carpets,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods

Weeksville Heritage Center:
Design commenced 2005

Daylight is
maximized to more
than 75% of rooms
Views outside
maximized to over
90% of rooms
Optimized fresh air
quantities
Building systems
and occupants
required to be
protected from
construction
contamination
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde

 

Daylight brought
into the building
through a variety of
strategies
CO2 monitors
control fresh air in
areas of high and
variable occupancy
Expansive glazing,
operable windows,
and occupant controls
for thermal comfort
Air quality
management during
construction; flush-out
planned
Low-emitting
paints, carpets,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods

Remsen Yard:
Design commenced 2005

Protection of
building systems and
occupants from
construction
contamination planned
Reduced exposure
to toxins, volatile
organic compounds,
urea formaldehyde
Daylight maximized
for 75% of regularly
occupied rooms
Views outside
maximized for 90% of
regularly occupied
rooms

Facility has very
few regularly occupied
areas (20% of total) –
these are grouped and
located on the second
floor with view
windows
CO2 monitors
control fresh air
Air quality
management during
construction is planned
Low-emitting
paints, carpets,
adhesives, sealants,
non-urea-
formaldehyde
composite woods
Fresh air intakes
located away from
dusty yard operations



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