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Overview

All DDC’s pilot projects have saved energy over their equivalent baseline code-compliant building, using energy modeling for design decision-making. Consequently, New York City is projected to save $1,030,000 from the projects below, as well as the related atmospheric emissions. Savings range from 8% to 65% of a building’s annual energy cost, and are calculated to payback in 2.1 to 16 years. Conservation methods vary by project, but daylighting techniques, coupled with high performance electric lighting systems and controls, have been one important energy conserving strategy for most of these projects. Geothermal systems are utilized in five projects, resulting in both energy conservation and the virtual elimination of on-site fossil fuel related emissions. Renewable energy sources including fuel cells and photovoltaics have been incorporated on a limited number of projects.

 
Bronx County Hall of Justice
Design commenced 1995

Energy use reduced 27% over a baseline New York Energy
Conservation Code
(1999)
Annual energy
savings of $330,200
(1999 rates)
Emissions reduced:
NOx – 3,690 pounds,
SO2 – 10,890
pounds, CO2 – 1,007
tons
Ozone depletion
reduced
Peak power usage
reduced

Daylight harvesting for most spaces
Light shelves with reflective surfaces, for daylight penetration
Crenellated, self-
shading curtain wall;
glass is insulated, low-
emissivity, with fritted
glass pattern
Displacement
ventilation
High-performance
lighting with
occupancy controls
Demand-based
ventilation for
courtrooms and jury
deliberation rooms,
controlled by CO2
sensors
Engine driven, gas-
fired chiller, variable
frequency drives, and
high-efficiency
motors/pumps

ACS Children's Center
Design commenced 1998

Energy use reduced – 33% over a baseline NYS Energy
Conservation Code
Electric energy
reduced use – 24%
from lighting systems
plus 14% in related
chiller down-sizing
Annual energy
savings of $94,000
(1998 rates)
Emissions reduced:
CO2 – by 506
tons/year (38%),
NOx by 1,529
pounds, SO2 by
1,988 pounds
Payback – 7.6
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Ozone depletion
reduced
Systems-operations
integrated

Daylighting of
occupied spaces
High-performance
lighting, with daylight
and occupancy
controls
Light-colored
reflective materials
Replacement of
historic windows with
high-performance,
argon gas filled,
insulating, low-e
glazing
Existing envelope
improved with foam-
in-place insulation –
increased R value and
elimination of thermal
bridging
Modular chillers
Con Edison steam
for heating
Variable-air-
volume system with
variable speed drives
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensor
Heat recovery from
ventilation air and
steam condensate
Commissioning of
systems

Queens Botanical Garden
Design commenced in 1999

Energy reduction
of 39% over
ASHRAE 90.1-1999
compliant baseline
Annual energy
savings of $6,573
(2005 rates)
Emissions reduction
– 60 pounds NOx; 38
tons CO2
Peak load
reduction – 11 kW
Payback – 16.5
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Renewable energy
– photovoltaic panel,
16 kW

Geothermal heat
pumps
Daylighting for all
occupied spaces, with
daylight and
occupancy controls
High-performance
lighting
Light shelves for
sun control
Operable windows
High-performance
glass
Demand ventilation
controlled by CO2
sensors
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans and pump
motors
Photovoltaic panels
Commissioning of
all systems

George R Vierno Center Dormitory
Design commenced 1999

Energy use reduced
– 15% over a New
York Energy
Conservation Code
baseline
Annual energy
savings of $71,090
(2006 rates)
Payback – 4.4
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Ozone depletion
reduced System-
operations integrated

Daylighting for
occupied spaces
High-performance
lighting
Envelope improved
with insulation,
insulated metal panels
and high-performance
glass
Concrete
construction – thermal
mass
High-efficiency fans
and pump motors
Two-stage steam
absorption chillers
Commissioning of
systems

Williamsburg Daycare Center
Design commenced 1999

Energy use less
than baseline New
York State Energy
Conservation Code
Ozone depletion
reduced
System-operations
integrated

Daylighting for all
regularly occupied
spaces
Light shelves for
sun control and sun
penetration deep into
the building
High-performance
lighting with
occupancy controls
Compact building
massing
Operable windows
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Energy Star®
appliances
Commissioning of
all systems

NY Hall of Science:
Design commenced 2000

Energy use
reduced 41% over a
baseline NYS
Energy Conservation
Code for the new
wing
Annual energy
savings of over
$60,000 ($45,400
for the new wing and
~ $15,000 for the
existing building)
Emissions reduced
Payback – 10
years simple
payback of energy
conserving measures
for the new wing
System-
operations integrated

Extensive daylighting
for exhibition and staff
spaces
High-performance
lighting, daylight
dimming, occupancy
sensors
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Temperature
stratification in exhibit
hall
Warmest zone
controls for the VAV
system
BMS controls for
the new and existing
mechanical equipment
Demand-based
ventilation in
permanent exhibit
spaces
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans, pump
motors
New efficient
chiller/ controls/
economizer for
existing building

Carl F Kauffeld House of Reptiles:
Design commenced 2000

Energy use reduced
– 20% over the
existing baseline
Annual energy
savings of $58,300
(2002 rates)
Payback – 2.1
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Comfort for reptiles
and visitors
Cleaner burning
fuel
System-operations
integrated

Heat recovery from
exhibit exhaust to
preheat ventilation air
Heating of exhibits
with radiant-heated
“rocks”
Daylighting for
keeper-occupied
spaces and selected
exhibits
High-performance
lighting – ambient and
exhibit. Metal halide
source used in exhibits
where possible. Low-
voltage halogen used
when incandescent
required by animals.
Controls – dual
switching and timers
Envelope improved
with high-performance
glass, and with
insulation at
replacement roof
Replacement of
burners on existing
boilers – gas with oil
back-up
Premium efficiency
fans and pump motors
Commissioning of
systems

Kensington Branch Library:
Design commenced 2001

Fossil fuel use
reduced
Energy use reduced
– 33% over a baseline
NYS Energy
Conservation Code
1991
Annual energy
savings of $9,400
(2002 rates)
Payback – 11
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Ozone depletion
reduced
System-operations
integrated

Geothermal heat
pumps, open loop
water-to-water
Daylighting for all
regularly occupied
spaces, using
windows, skylights,
light shelves, fritted
glass curtain wall
High-performance
lighting, daylight
dimming, occupancy
controls
Natural ventilation
with skylight louvers
and operable windows
BMS system with
remote monitoring
Terra cotta
rainscreen panel
system provides
breathable exterior
wall
High-efficiency
multi-zone variable-
air-volume system and
controls
Commissioning of
systems
Stairs inviting and
centrally located to
encourage use

Lion House Conservation:
Design commenced 2002

Energy use reduced
– 57% over a baseline
ASHRAE 90.1-1999
Annual energy
savings of $140,000
(2003 rates);
emissions reduced
Payback – 6.3
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Renewable energy
offset energy cost
Fossil fuel use
reduced; ozone
depletion reduced

Geothermal heat
pump system with six
standing column wells
Daylighting for
exhibits and public
areas
Dynamic skylights –
Ethylene
Tetraflouroethylene
(ETFE) technology
Fuel cell
Sophisticated heat
recovery protocol,
prioritizing use of
waste heat from
condensers and fuel
cell, steam from zoo’s
co-gen plant
High-performance
lighting
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensors
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans and pump
motors
Comprehensive
commissioning of
systems
Toleration of larger
swings in maintained
temperature

New Sunrise Yard:
Design commenced 2003

Energy use reduced
65% over a baseline
ASHRAE 90.1-1999
Lighting energy use
reduced 85-90% over
a baseline
ASHRAE/IESNA
90.1-2001
Annual energy savings of $61,700 (2005 rates)
Saving 34,300
therms/year of gas and
243,700 kWh/year of
electricity
Payback – 6.2
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures
Ozone depletion
reduced
System operations
integrated

Extensive
daylighting, with roof
monitors, clerestories,
view windows
High-performance
lighting, dimming and
occupancy controls,
timers
Light shelves, fins,
overhangs, diffused
glass for sun control
Natural ventilation
w/ demand fan assist
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Radiant floor
heating in shops and
warehouse
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensors
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans and pump
motors
Energy Star®
appliances
Expanded
commissioning of
systems

Brooklyn Children’s Museum:
Design commenced 2004

Energy use reduced
minimum 20% over a
baseline ASHRAE
90.1-1999
Emissions reduced
Peak energy load
reduced
Photovoltaics offset
energy cost 1.5%
Ozone depletion
reduced
System-operations
integrated

Geothermal heat
pump open loop
system with two
supply/two discharge
wells, each 345 feet
deep
Daylighting and
high-performance
lighting, with daylight
dimming and
occupancy controls
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensors
Building
management system
with digital monitoring
controls
Variable frequency
drives, heat
exchangers, maximum
zone control
Photovoltaic panels
Expanded
commissioning of
systems

Office of Emergency Management:
Design commenced 2004

Energy use reduced
– 8.33% over a
baseline ASHRAE
90.1-1999
Annual savings of
$8,000 (2005 rates)
Emissions reduced
– 67.2 pounds NOx,
44.8 pounds SOx,
and 47 tons CO2
Ozone depletion
reduced
System-operations
integrated

Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensors
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans and pump
motors
Heat recovery
Extended
commissioning of
systems

Glen Oaks Branch Library:
Design commenced 2005

Energy use reduced
– 30% over
ASHRAE 90.1-1999
baseline
Fossil fuel use
reduced
Ozone depletion
reduced
System-operations
integrate

Radiant heating and
cooling in floor
Daylighting for
reading areas, offices,
and public areas, using
a variety of types and
screening techniques
High-performance
lighting with daylight
and occupancy
controls
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensors
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans, and
pump motors
Heat recovery
system
Extended
commissioning of
systems

Weeksville Heritage Center:
Design commenced 2005

Energy use reduced
26% over a baseline
ASHRAE 90.1-1999
Lighting energy use
reduced 22% over
baseline ASHRAE
90.1
Annual energy
savings of $19,700
(2005 rates)
Emissions reduced
for NOx, SOx, CO2,
and PM
Peak energy load
reduced
Ozone depletion
reduced
System-operations
integrated

Geothermal heat
pump open loop
system for heating and
cooling
Controlled
daylighting for all
spaces used by
visitors and staff
High-performance
lighting with daylight
and occupancy
controls
CO2 sensors to
limit energy used to
condition unoccupied
spaces
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
High-efficiency
variable-air-volume
system, fans and pump
motors
Energy Star®
appliances
Commissioning of
systems

Remsen Yard:
Design commenced 2005

Energy use reduced
– estimated at 31%
over a baseline
ASHRAE 90.1-2004
Renewable energy
accounts for 12% of
energy reduction.
Contributes 26% of
annual electrical load
Annual energy
savings of $14,000
(2006 rates)
Payback – 10
years simple payback
of energy conserving
measures (including
PV’s)
Ozone depletion
reduced

Photovoltaic glass
panels (thin film) with
50 kW peak capacity
Daylighting for all
occupied spaces,
skylights
High-performance
lighting, with daylight
and occupancy
controls
Garage unheated
and naturally
ventilated; engine
block heaters
Drain water heat
recovery
Envelope improved
with insulation and
high-performance
glass
Demand-based
ventilation controlled
by CO2 sensors
Commissioning of
all systems



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