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Projects & Proposals > Staten Island > S. I. Growth Management Printer Friendly Version
Staten Island Growth Management
Overview

Overview
Residential Regulation Changes - Approved August 12th, 2004
Commercial Overlay Boundary Changes/Eliminations - Approved October 11th, 2005
LDGMA Follow-Up Text Amendments - Approved December 8th, 2005
Commercial Regulation Changes - Approved December 21st, 2005
Commercial Rezonings - Approved December 21st, 2005
Work in Progress


Preserve Neighborhood Character
Preserve Neighborhood Character
In July of 2003, Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg announced the formation of the Staten Island Growth Management Task Force. The Task Force, co-chaired by City Planning Director Amanda M. Burden and Borough President James Molinaro, was charged with examining issues of overbuilding and development, and identifying short-term solutions, potential legislative changes, and strategic long-term planning initiatives to protect and enhance Staten Island's quality of life.

From 1990 to 2000, Staten Island (Richmond County) was the fastest growing county in New York State. Over that decade, the borough grew by 65,000 people and added 24,000 new housing units – an increase of approximately 17 percent -- leading to concerns about overdevelopment. In many cases, the new housing was overly dense and out-of-context with the built character of surrounding homes, undermining the quality of life of residents and the integrity of their neighborhoods.

In December 2003, the Task Force released the Staten Island Growth Management Task Force Final Report, with recommendations for improving residential development on Staten Island, encouraging appropriate commercial development and identifying long-term planning needs.

After an intensive four-month effort involving the Task Force and other city agencies, the Department of City Planning (DCP) proposed changes in zoning regulations for residential development and, on May 24, 2004, referred the proposal for public review. All three Staten Island community boards, the Borough Board and Borough President overwhelmingly supported the proposed changes.  After City Planning Commission and City Council approval, the new regulations became effective on August 12, 2004 (PDF Document Read the CPC Report).

City Planning continued to work with the Task Force and the Department of Buildings (DOB) and proposed a series of zoning text and map amendments to implement additional Task Force recommendations for commercial and residential districts.  All of these proposals have been adopted by the City Council. The Task Force continues to work with DCP to clarify and strengthen regulations for residential development and to encourage appropriate development in the borough’s commercial zoning districts. The on-going Work in Progress and other issues raised by the Task Force members will be addressed at the next meeting of the Task Force.


Task Force Achievements

  • On August 12, 2004 the City Council adopted the Lower Density Growth Management Text Amendments, as proposed by Mayor Bloomberg's Staten Island Growth Management Task Force. The new regulations apply to any development in residential districts within a designated "Lower Density Growth Management Area". Primarily affecting R1 through R5 residential zoning districts, the new regulations maintain and enhance existing neighborhood character by reducing the density of new residential development, and by ensuring better quality site design. Requirements for yards and open spaces between homes and for off-street parking increase, and stricter guidelines are imposed for developments along private roads.

    Simultaneous with adoption of the new zoning text, the entire borough of Staten Island was designated New York City's first "Lower Density Growth Management Area", a designation that could apply to other communities facing similar challenges: extensive new home construction -- often at odds with prevailing neighborhood character -- limited or distant mass transit, and high car ownership. In September, 2004, Throgs Neck in Bronx Community District 10 became the second such area.

  • On October 11, 2005 the City Council adopted the Task Force proposals to change or eliminate 21 commercial overlays as approved by the City Planning Commission (CPC) on September 14, 2005. The Commission’s modifications reflected testimony from commercial property owners at the CPC public hearing. By removing or changing the commercial overlays, inappropriate residential and commercial development is precluded, and the lower density growth management regulations apply.

  • On December 8, 2005 the City Council adopted follow-up text amendments to the Lower Density Growth Management (LDGMA) regulations. These amendments clarify regulations for minimum lot area, minimum lot width and open space in rear yards in residence districts.

  • On December 21, 2005 the City Council also adopted text amendments proposed by DCP to establish commercial zoning regulations that prohibit residential-only development in commercial overlays and districts in the Staten Island LDGMA. Only retail or mixed-use development (residential above commercial or community facilities) is now permitted in overlays and certain commercial districts; in regional commercial districts only non-residential uses are permitted as-of-right. In all commercial districts, street trees and landscaped buffers between residential and non-residential uses are required.  

  • On December 21, 2005 the City Council adopted zoning map amendments recommended by the task force to ensure that future development is consistent with the existing character and with the concurrently adopted commercial zoning regulations. The zoning map changes affect three commercial areas in Castleton, on New Dorp Lane and at Arthur Kill Road and Richmond Avenue.

  • Maintain Staten Island's Town Centers
    Maintain Staten Island's Town Centers
    The Task Force is continuing to pursue further changes that will create a new commercial district to be mapped in select locations to encourage the preservation and revitalization of pedestrian-oriented mixed-use development neighborhoods – which historically are many of Staten Island’s Town Centers. The new district rules will build upon the existing built form and transit connections found in these town centers and provide appropriate building heights, envelopes and parking locations. In addition, in conjunction with recommendations of the Mayor’s Staten Island Transportation Task Force, additional rules requiring access between large commercial parking lots have been proposed. DCP is drafting recommendations for Task Force review in 2007.



Overview
Residential Regulation Changes - Approved August 12th, 2004
Commercial Overlay Boundary Changes/Eliminations - Approved October 11th, 2005
LDGMA Follow-Up Text Amendments - Approved December 8th, 2005
Commercial Regulation Changes - Approved December 21st, 2005
Commercial Rezonings - Approved December 21st, 2005
Work in Progress



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