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Projects & Proposals > Citywide > Privately Owned Public Space Printer Friendly Version
Privately Owned Public Space

Privately Owned Public SpacesCurrent Public Plaza Standards History
2007 Text Amendment 2009 Follow-up Text Amendment Inventory

  Note:

These pages present Privately Owned Public Spaces as they were described in Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, by Jerold S. Kayden, The New York City Department of City Planning, and the Municipal Art Society of New York, published by John Wiley & Sons, 2000. These pages are not regularly updated and do not describe all Privately Owned Public Spaces as they exist today.


privately owned public space: Clinton and Upper West Side Manhattan CDs 4 and 7
Maps:
The map, below, shows privately owned public spaces in Manhattan CDs 4 and 7 using the classes defined at the right. Selecting a public space on the map will link to the entry in the Table with a fuller description of the public space. Tagged addresses on the map may have additional spaces classified as hiatus, circulation or marginal.
map legend

The classifications attributed to each space are taken directly from Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, by Jerold S. Kayden, The New York City Department of City Planning, and the Municipal Art Society of New York, published by John Wiley & Sons, 2000.

clinton and upper west side - manhattan community districts 4 and 7 243: 200 West 79th Street - Gloucester 242: 201 West 70th Street - One Sherman Square 241: 2025 Broadway - Nevada Towers 240: 1991 Broadway - Bel Canto 239: 145 West 67th Street - Tower 67 238: 130 West 67th Street - Toulaine 237: 80 Central Park West 236: 10 West 66th Street 235: 2 Lincoln Square - Two Lincoln Square 234: 75 West End Avenue - West End Towers 233: 1 Lincoln Plaza - One Lincoln Plaza 232: 1886 Broadway - 30 Lincoln Plaza 231: 61 West 62nd Street - One Harkness Plaza / Harmony Atrium 230: 44 West 62nd Street - Lincoln Plaza Towers 229: One Central Park West - Trump International Hotel and Tower 228: 30 West 61st Street - Beaumont 227: 45 West 60th Street - Regent 226: 200 West 60th Street - Concerto 55: 1000 Tenth Avenue - St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center 54: 555 West 57th Street - BMW 53: 347 West 57th Street - Colonnade 52: 322 West 57th Street - Sheffield 51: 330 West 56th Street 50: 825 Eighth Avenue - One Worldwide Plaza 49: 650 West 42nd Street - River Place

PRIVATELY OWNED PUBLIC SPACE - Classifications are defined below.
Select a "Destination" Public Space from the table for a more detailed profile.

CLINTON                              Manhattan District 4
ID Building Address Building Name Public Space Classification
49 650 West 42nd Street River Place Public Open Space Neighborhood
50 825 Eighth Avenue One Worldwide Plaza Elliptical Arcades Marginal
      Plaza Destination
(under renovation)
      Subway Access Areas Circulation
51 330 West 56th Street   Plaza Marginal
      Arcade Marginal
52 322 West 57th Street Sheffield Plaza Neighborhood
      Arcade Marginal
53 347 West 57th Street Colonnade Plaza Marginal
54 555 West 57th Street BMW Plaza Hiatus
      Arcade Marginal
55 1000 Tenth Avenue St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center Public Open Space Neighborhood

UPPER WEST SIDE               Manhattan District 7
ID Building Address Building Name Public Space Classification
226 200 West 60th Street Concerto Public Open Space Neighborhood
227 45 West 60th Street Regent Residential Plaza Neighborhood
228 30 West 61st Street Beaumont Additional Residential Plaza Marginal
      Arcade Marginal
      Residential Plaza Hiatus
229 One Central Park West Trump International Hotel and Tower Plaza Hiatus
230 44 West 62nd Street Lincoln Plaza Towers Plaza Marginal
231 61 West 62nd Street One Harkness Plaza/ Harmony Atrium Covered Plaza Hiatus
232 1886 Broadway 30 Lincoln Plaza Covered Plaza Marginal
      Landscaped Plaza Neighborhood
      Mandatory Arcade Circulation
      Special Permit Arcade Marginal
233 1 Lincoln Plaza One Lincoln Plaza Arcade Circulation
      Plaza Hiatus
234 75 West End Avenue West End Towers Public Open Spaces Neighborhood
235 2 Lincoln Square Two Lincoln Square Covered Plaza Destination
      Mandatory Arcade Circulation
      Special Permit Plaza Circulation
Return to Map
236 10 West 66th Street   Arcade Marginal
      Plaza Marginal
237 80 Central Park West   Arcade Marginal
      Plaza Marginal
238 130 West 67th Street Toulaine Arcade Marginal
      Plaza Marginal
239 145 West 67th Street Tower 67 Residential Plaza Hiatus
240 1991 Broadway Bel Canto Covered Plaza Neighborhood
241 2025 Broadway Nevada Towers Plaza Marginal
242 201 West 70th Street One Sherman Square Plaza Marginal
243 200 West 79th Street Gloucester Plaza Marginal

New York City's Privately Owned Public Spaces
Classifications

The classifications attributed to each space and the definitions of the classifications listed below are taken directly from Privately Owned Public Space: The New York City Experience, by Jerold S. Kayden, The New York City Department of City Planning, and the Municipal Art Society of New York, published by John Wiley & Sons, 2000.
Destination space is high-quality public space that attracts employees, residents, and visitors from outside, as well as from, the space's immediate neighborhood. Users socialize, eat, shop, view art, or attend a programmed event, although they may also visit the space for sedentary, individual activities of reading and relaxing. The design supports a broad audience: spaces are usually sizable, well proportioned, brightly lit if indoors, aesthetically interesting, and constructed with first-class materials. Amenities are varied and frequently include some combination of food service, artwork, programmatic activities, restrooms, retail frontage, and water features, as well as seating, tables, trees, and other plantings. From time to time, a single amenity like a museum will be so compelling that it alone transforms the space into a destination space.
Neighborhood space is high-quality public space that draws residents and employees from the immediate neighborhood, including the host building and surrounding buildings within a three-block radius. Users go to neighborhood space for such activities as group socializing, taking care of children, and individual reading and relaxing. Neighborhood spaces are generally smaller that destination spaces, are strongly linked with the adjacent street and host building, are oriented toward sunlight, are made with good construction materials, and are carefully maintained. Amenities typically include seating, tables, drinking fountains, water features, planting, and trees, but not food service and programmatic uses sometimes found at destination spaces.
Hiatus space is public space that accommodates the passing user for a brief stop, but never attracts neighborhood or destination space use. Usually next to the public sidewalk and small in size, such spaces are characterized by design attributes geared to their modest function, and include such basic functional amenities as seating. Hiatus spaces range from high to low quality in terms of design, amenities, and/or aesthetic appeal.
Circulation space is public space that materially improves the pedestrian's experience of moving through the city. Its principal purpose is to enable pedestrians to move faster from point A to point B, and/or to make the journey more comfortable by providing weather protection for a significant stretch. Circulation space is sometimes uncovered, sometimes covered, and sometimes fully enclosed. It is often one link in a multiblock chain of spaces. Size, location, and proportion all support its principal mission. Functional amenities that provide a reason to linger are not taken into account when classifying a space as a circulation space.
Marginal space is public space that, lacking satisfactory levels of design, amenities, or aesthetic appeal deters members of the public from using the space for any purpose. Such spaces usually have one or more of the following characteristics: barren expanses or strips of concrete or terrazzo, elevations above or below the public sidewalk, inhospitable microclimates characterized by shade or wind, no functional amenities, spiked railings on otherwise suitable surfaces, dead or dying landscaping, poor maintenance, drop-off driveways, and no measurable public use.

Privately Owned Public Space:
Introduction
Downtown -- Manhattan District 1
Greenwich Village -- Manhattan District 2
Clinton and the Upper West Side -- Manhattan Districts 4 & 7
Central Midtown -- Manhattan District 5
East Midtown -- Manhattan District 6
Upper East Side -- Manhattan Districts 8 & 11
Downtown Brooklyn -- Brooklyn District 2
Long Island City -- Queens District 2

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