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Projects & Proposals > Citywide > Open Industrial Uses Printer Friendly Version
Open Industrial Uses
Introduction
Introduction | Updates | Report | Advisory Committee | Contact Us

Open Industrial Uses

The Open Industrial Uses Study (OIUS) is designed to support and grow the City’s working waterfront and industrial businesses, while making industrial areas greener, stronger, safer and more resilient to climate change.

Background
The Open Industrial Uses Study resulted from recent initiatives, including Vision 2020: New York City’s Comprehensive Waterfront Plan, North Shore 2030: Improving and Reconnecting the North Shore’s Unique and Historic Assets, and in reviewing the City’s industrial policies, including those relevant for Industrial Business Zones (IBZs) and Significant Maritime and Industrial Areas (SMIAs).
Six primary use categories of study
Primary Categories
Industrial uses, including many that operate in open yards, are prevalent throughout industrial areas in all five boroughs and tend to concentrate along the city’s waterways. Unenclosed or open industrial uses are permitted within the city’s manufacturing districts, including  auto dismantling, recycling, processing of construction and demolition debris, asphalt and cement manufacturing, scrap metal processing, and general storage of equipment and aggregate. Open uses that do not provide adequate environmental controls create objectionable influences on neighboring businesses and residents and pollute the city’s soil, air and waterways. Despite advances in technology, the establishment of best management practices, and stricter federal air and water quality standards, zoning standards (Section 42-20) regarding the performance of open industrial uses have not changed since the adoption of the 1961 Zoning Resolution. A variety of other laws and regulations also apply, but regulatory gaps and enforcement challenges exist, and some facilities do not comply with contemporary industrial and environmental standards.

Open industrial uses are essential to New York City’s economy, they provide critical jobs, infrastructure, and services citywide.
Open industrial uses are essential to New York City’s economy, they provide critical jobs, infrastructure, and services citywide.  
A range of structural controls to limit off-site impacts will be evaluated for deployment at open industrial sites.
A range of structural controls to limit off-site impacts will be evaluated for deployment at open industrial sites.
These uses could be vulnerable to the potential impacts of climate change. Open piles and outdoor storage can be carried offsite by wind, rain and flood waters.
These uses could be vulnerable to the potential impacts of climate change. Open piles and outdoor storage can be carried offsite by wind, rain and flood waters.

In 2011, DCP conducted field surveys in six industrial areas as case studies – Eastchester and Hunts Point in the Bronx, Jamaica in Queens, both the Brooklyn and Queens areas along Newtown Creek, the East New York and Flatlands/Fairfield IBZs, and the North Shore of Staten Island. The information gathered has provided an understanding of the number of such uses in each study area, their size, and issues associated with each type of use. In cooperation with partner City agencies and in coordination with the State and industry, community, and environmental stakeholders, DCP is advancing this study to identify actionable recommendations that will limit offsite impacts from these facilities.


Objective

The OIUS will assess cost-effective pollution prevention controls and stronger safeguards for open uses and storage of hazardous and non-hazardous materials at industrial facilities. Implementing cost-effective pollution prevention controls at these facilities will improve the business climate in industrial areas, retaining important industrial businesses and fostering new businesses and jobs in areas near open industrial uses. The study will generate recommendations for zoning text amendments or other legislation, as well as assess incentives that may assist in the implementation of such controls. This would reinforce other City efforts to improve the business and natural environment, protect communities, while also increasing resilience to climate risks.

Open Industrial Uses



 

Department of State Logo This material was prepared for the New York State Department of State, with funds provided under Title 11 of the Environmental Protection Fund.
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