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Projects & Proposals > Manhattan > Ladies' Miles Rezoning Printer Friendly Version
Ladies' Mile Rezoning - Approved!
Objectives
Objectives | Land Use & Neighborhood Character | Existing Zoning | Proposed Zoning

Ladies' Mile Proposed Zoning Map
Proposed Zoning Map - Ladies' Mile
Zoning Map PDF View larger map in PDF

This application seeks to rezone a 5- block area in the Flatiron District. The area is located on the midblocks between Fifth and Sixth avenues, from the centerline between 16th and 17th streets to the south, to 22nd Street on the north. Except for two properties in its southwest corner, the entire Rezoning Area is located within the Ladies Mile Historic District.

The area is currently zoned M1-6M a 10 FAR district that allows for a mix of manufacturing and commercial uses. Though M1-6M zones allow for limited residential conversions, new residential construction is prohibited (see Existing Zoning). This application proposes to rezone the area to C6-4A a 10 FAR contextual district which would allow for a similar mix of uses and would allow for as-of-right residential construction and conversion (see Proposed Zoning).

The proposed application is intended to:

  • Update the zoning to reflect the current mixed-use character of the area
    The area has transitioned from a largely commercial and manufacturing center to one with a lively mix of office, retail, institutional and residential uses. Today, the area contains almost 350 residential units and just three percent of the jobs in the area are in the manufacturing sector.
  • Allow for residential development on underutilized lots
    The area contains several undeveloped sites that have remained as parking lots for decades because there has not been a demand for new commercial or manufacturing space in the area. The proposed zoning would allow the parking lots to be developed with residential buildings, putting those sites into more productive use and helping to address the city’s housing shortage.
  • Strengthen and preserve the area’s built character
    The existing zoning permits building types that do not reflect the prevailing character of the surrounding area. The lack of effective zoning controls governing height and setback encourages tower development without height limitations that contrasts sharply with the existing built character of the neighborhood. The proposed zoning would ensure that any new development will be in character with the built context of the surrounding historic district.

Concurrent with the zoning map amendment (C 040331 ZSM), an application has been filed for zoning text changes (N 040332 ZRM) that would clarify the zoning text, allow street wall heights to be raised to 150 feet, and grandfather a previously approved special permit. On June 21, 2004, the Department of City Planning and the private co-applicant submitted a revised application for the proposed zoning text amendment that restores the current requirement for a special permit from the Board of Standards and Appeals for any new eating and drinking establishment in the area with a capacity of over 200, and any eating and drinking establishment of any size with dancing (see Zoning Text Amendments Zoning Text Amendments).

The applications have been submitted jointly by the Department of City Planning and a private applicant. The private applicant controls two parking lots in the rezoning area which it intends to develop with residential buildings. The private applicant has separately submitted two special permit applications for below-grade parking garages on its two development sites. These garages would replace the parking provided on the parking lots that are likely to be developed under the proposed zoning.


Public Review
On March 22, 2004, the Department of City Planning certified the ULURP application for the proposed zoning map amendment, initiating the public review process. The application for the zoning text change, a non-ULURP action, was referred for concurrent review. On April 8, 2004, Community Board 5, by a vote of 26 in favor, 3 opposed and 1 abstention, adopted a resolution to disapprove the application with conditions. On May 14, 2004, the Manhattan Borough President recommended conditional disapproval of the proposal. The City Planning Commission held a public hearing on the proposal on May 26, 2004. On June 21, 2004, the Department of City Planning and the private co-applicant submitted a revised application for the proposed zoning text amendment that restores the current requirement for a special permit from the Board of Standards and Appeals for any new eating and drinking establishment in the area with a capacity of over 200, and any eating and drinking establishment of any size with dancing. On June 23, 2004, the City Planning Commission voted unanimously to approve the revised zoning text change application and the rezoning application. (PDF Document Read the CPC reports). On August 12, 2004, the City Council voted to unanimously approve the applications.

For more information on the Ladies’ Mile Rezoning, call the Manhattan Office of the Department of City Planning at (212) 720-3480.




Objectives | Land Use & Neighborhood Character | Existing Zoning | Proposed Zoning

 


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Brief explanations of terms in green italics can be viewed by clicking on the term. Words and phrases followed by an asterisk (*) are defined terms in the Zoning Resolution, primarily in Section 12-10. Consult the Zoning Resolution for the official and legally binding definitions of these words and phrases.





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