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Projects & Proposals > Manhattan > Hudson Yards Printer Friendly Version
Hudson Yards
The Area
Overview | Area | Original Proposal as Adopted | EIS | Follow-Up Actions/Bonus Contributions
Financing | Prior Planning Studies

Aerial view of Hudson Yards
Aerial view of surrounding
neighborhoods
Hudson Yards is the area generally between West 30th Street on the south, Seventh and Eighth avenues on the east, West 43rd Street on the north, and Twelfth Avenue on the west. It is bordered by Clinton to the north, Chelsea to the south, Hudson River Park to the west, and the Garment Center and Midtown to the east. The area, currently, is isolated from the subway system, has few public amenities and little open space and is primarily characterized by large tracts of underutilized land. The land uses in the area are mainly transportation, commercial, industrial, parking lots, garages, and residential. Public facilities and open space comprise very few of the uses within the area.

Several significant buildings and transportation facilities are located in and around Hudson Yards. Major Transportation facilities include Pennsylvania Station, the proposed Moynihan Station to be constructed within the Farley Post Office building, and the Port Authority Bus Terminal. Major buildings in the area include the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, Madison Square Garden, 450 West 33rd/Daily News building, and the commercial office buildings located at One and Two Pennsylvania Plaza.

Superblocks along 33rd Street
Superblocks along
33rd Street
Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, on 11th Avenue
Jacob K. Javits Convention Center, on 11th Avenue
The area is predominantly organized along Manhattan's grid of streets and avenues creating the typical 200 foot by 800 foot blocks. Although most of the blocks conform to the street grid, a series of superblocks extend from Seventh to Twelfth avenues along the south side of West 33rd Street. These superblocks are a consequence of the railroad network that links Pennsylvania Station with the Long Island Railroad storage and maintenance yards. The superblocks also extend from West 34th to West 39th streets between Eleventh and Twelfth avenues to accommodate the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. In addition to the superblocks, the Lincoln Tunnel and its access ramps disrupt the regular street grid. The Lincoln Tunnel is comprised of three separate tunnels, two of the entrances are between Ninth and Tenth avenues and one between Tenth and Eleventh avenues.

Detailed Aerial View of Hudson Yards
Aerial view of
the transportation
infrastructure network
Transportation infrastructure is the dominant feature, establishing a gritty industrial character and bleak pedestrian environment in the area. The Lincoln Tunnel and its access ramps cover approximately 15 acres between Ninth and Eleventh avenues, the MTA Rail Yards cover 26 acres from West 30th to West 33rd streets between Tenth and Twelfth avenues (Eleventh Avenue bridges over the Yards dividing the Yards into two sites: the Eastern Yards and Western Yards), and the open Amtrak Empire Line railroad cut is visible from West 36th to West 39th streets between Tenth and Eleventh avenues. The infrastructure also bifurcates the area by disrupting the development pattern and establishing blank walls along the street edges.

MTA Railyards
The MTA Railyards
crossed by 11th Avenue
Light industrial uses are scattered throughout the rezoning area, primarily concentrated in three areas, between Tenth and Eleventh avenues, across from the Javits Convention Center, in the Garment Center between Eighth and Ninth avenues north of West 35th Street, and between Seventh and Eighth avenues south of West 31st Street. The light industrial uses east of Eighth Avenue are concentrated in large loft buildings and include garment and printing uses. The area across from the Javits Convention Center is primarily auto related and vehicle storage uses.




Javits Convention Center plaza
Javits Convention
Center plaza
 
Lincoln tunnel cuts at 9th Ave. and 35th St.
Lincoln tunnel cuts at
9th Ave. and 35th St.
 
34th Street
34th Street
Streetscape along 38th Street between 10th and 11th Avenues
Streetscape along 38th
St. (10th & 11th Ave.)
 
Residential buildings along 9th Avenue
Residential buildings
along 9th Avenue
 
Lincoln tunnel accessramps at 39th Street
Lincoln tunnel access
ramps at 39th Street
 
Amtrack cut at 39th Street
Amtrack cut at 39th Street
The only permanent public open space is the hard-scape plaza across from the Javits Convention Center. Several small community parks have been created on Port Authority property through an agreement with the community. In addition, privately owned public space is located at One and Two Pennsylvania Plaza, and on the south side of West 42nd Street between Eleventh and Twelfth avenues.

The character of the proposed rezoning area differs significantly from one area to another. Along Ninth Avenue from West 35th Street to West 40th Street, the area is primarily residential buildings with five to six story walk-up apartment buildings with ground floor retail. Though there is a strong built context of residential buildings, there are several parking and underbuilt lots.

West of Ninth Avenue between West 35th and 40th streets, the area is primarily low scale, with one to three story commercial and industrial buildings, some walk-up apartment buildings, and larger loft buildings. The area is dominated by the presence of infrastructure, primarily the Lincoln Tunnel approaches between Ninth and Tenth avenues and the open Amtrak railroad cut between Tenth and Eleventh avenues. Much of the land that isn’t utilized for infrastructure uses are auto related uses or surface level bus and automobile parking. The lots west of Ninth Avenue are generally larger, the street walls are not continuous, and there are fewer ground floor retail uses.

West 34th Street from Eighth Avenue to Eleventh Avenue is a mixed-use corridor of commercial and residential uses. The level of development, including size and heights of buildings, is greatest near Eighth Avenue. Commercial and residential buildings include pre-war apartment buildings and converted loft buildings. West of Tenth Avenue, the level of development is lower scale and the uses more commercial and industrial.

West 31st to West 33rd streets from Eighth Avenue to Eleventh Avenue is primarily the open rail cuts that serve Pennsylvania Station. There are several large buildings that have been developed above these cuts, including the 450 West 33rd/Daily News building on Tenth Avenue, the Farley Post Office Building, and Madison Square Garden.

The area south of Pennsylvania Station is characterized by large loft structures of twelve to sixteen stories interspersed with low rise buildings and parking lots. Many of these buildings have been converted to commercial uses.

West 42nd Street to the west of Eighth Avenue is a mixture of high rise residential, theaters and entertainment uses, and low scale commercial uses. West 42nd Street has experienced a significant number of new, high-rise residential developments over the past several years. There are still several parking lots and low-scale buildings with entertainment, community facility, or industrial uses within this portion of West 42nd Street.
High-rise residential development along 42nd Street
High-rise residential
development along
42nd Street
 

The Garment Center between Eighth and Ninth avenues is comprised of loft buildings of twelve to sixteen stories interspersed with low-rise buildings and parking lots. There is still garment related uses in these larger loft buildings, however, commercial uses are becoming more common. There are a few residential uses within the area.

Existing Zoning
TThere have been few zoning changes in the area since the adoption of the 1961 Zoning Resolution, which mapped manufacturing districts in much of the area. The area - particularly west of Ninth Avenue - continues to remain zoned predominantly for low- and medium-density manufacturing. Several small areas have been rezoned to commercial districts, primarily along West 42nd Street, Ninth Avenue, and across from the Javits Convention Center on Eleventh Avenue.

Existing Zoning
PDF Document Existing zoning map

Currently, the majority of the lot area within the rezoning area is zoned for manufacturing with the remaining area zoned commercially. The major manufacturing designation is M1-5 with a floor area ratio (FAR) 5.0. Commercial designations vary, with C6-2 and C6-4 districts with FARs of 6.0 and 10.0 respectively being the most common.

The allowable FARs within the rezoning area are generally 5.0 and 6.0 FAR with scattered areas of higher density. Areas of higher density include the West 42nd Street corridor, the Special Jacob K. Javits Convention Center District along Eleventh Avenue, and the superblock between Ninth and Tenth avenues and West 31st and West 33rd streets.

There are four special zoning districts that are wholly or partially within the area. The Special Jacob K. Javits Convention Center District was adopted in 1986 to promote development across from the Javits Convention Center between West 34th and West 39th streets. A portion of the Special Garment Center District is located between Eighth and Ninth avenues from West 35th to West 40th streets. The district includes preservation requirements for garment-related manufacturing uses in the midblocks. The other two special districts, the Special Clinton District and the Special Midtown District, are located at the periphery of the rezoning area.





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