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Projects & Proposals > Bronx > Hunts Point Printer Friendly Version
The Special Hunts Point District - Approved!
Existing Context and Zoning
Overview | Existing Context and Zoning | Proposed Actions | Public Review


Existing Context
The Hunts Point peninsula occupies 690 acres in Community District 2, Borough of the Bronx. The East and Bronx rivers surround the Hunts Point peninsula on three sides. The Bruckner Expressway and the CSX/Amtrak rail corridor create the northern boundary of the peninsula and separate it from the rest of Community District 2.

Two stations on the #6 subway line (Hunts Point Avenue and Longwood Avenue) are located along Southern Boulevard, which is just west of the proposed rezoning area.  In addition, the Bx 6 bus line runs along Hunts Point Avenue, Spofford Avenue and Food Center Drive. Freight rail serves the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center on the east side of the peninsula. The area has access to the Bruckner Expressway (I-278).

329 acres of the peninsula are occupied by the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center. The distribution center consists of three markets – Produce Market, Meat Market and newly built Fulton Fish Market.

The 22 block Hunts Point residential neighborhood is located on the north-western portion of the peninsula, and is predominately characterized by a mix of row-houses and medium density apartment buildings varying in height from two to eight stories.  The neighborhood is completely surrounded by manufacturing uses, including non-compatible uses such as scrap yards and waste transfer stations.

New Fulton Fish Market Manida Street - Residential Neighborhood: medium density apartment houses and row houses on Manida Street.

New Fulton Fish Market

Manida Street - Residential Neighborhood: medium density apartment houses and row houses on Manida Street.



There are some small local retail shops along Hunts Point Avenue, but the residential community and the employees lack retail options in the area. The peninsula is under-served by large grocery stores or supermarkets. Hunts Point is also home to a growing arts and culture scene, led by the Point, which has been a vibrant and pro-active community center in the neighborhood. The remainder of the peninsula is comprised of a diverse mix of small industrial businesses, including food-related, manufacturing, construction, utility, auto-related, warehousing /distribution, and waste-related uses such as waste transfer stations.

There is an inherent conflict between food-related uses and waste-related and other heavy industrial uses on the peninsula. Waste-related businesses can generate odors and rodents that are detrimental to food-related businesses as well as the nearby residential uses. Current zoning allows new waste-related uses and food related uses to locate side by side which hinders the City’s efforts to develop an agglomeration of food industries in the area. Current zoning does not provide a transition of uses between Hunts Point Food Distribution Market and adjacent heavy industrial uses, which can be detrimental to the expansion and operation of the Market.

Other note-worthy land uses on the peninsula include DEP’s Hunts Point Water Pollution Control Plant, the New York Organic Fertilizer Company, a barge used by the Department of Corrections for detentions of persons awaiting trial, a former Department of Sanitation marine transfer station to the south, new Barretto Point Park and Tiffany Street Pier to the south, Hunts Point Riverside Park to the east, the Point community center, and the Bronx Charter School for the Arts to the north.

An open scrap yard on Barretto Street Tiffany Street Pier
Barretto Point Park
An open scrap yard on Barretto Street Tiffany Street Pier
Barretto Point Park

New Fulton Fish Market Prison barge in Hunts Point

Hunts Point Riverside Park
Prison barge in Hunts Point


About eight percent of the industrial area, excluding the Hunts Point Food Distribution Center, is vacant land/ buildings and about five percent consists of parking lots, salvage yards and waste-related uses. The land in the peninsula is limited and its use should be maximized to spur economic development and job opportunities for the community.

Open auto-related uses and residential development on Hunts Point Avenue
Open auto-related uses and residential development on Hunts Point Avenue
Open junk yard in Hunts Point
Open junk yard in Hunts Point

Hunts Point’s negative image persists in the city despite the fact that it houses one of the largest food distribution centers in the world and a thriving platform for small industrial businesses, which provide approximately 10,000 jobs. The presence of a vibrant residential community and the emergence of a thriving visual and performance arts scene represented by the Point could be strengthened. Moreover, open industrial uses like scrap yards, storage of parts and materials, junk yards, etc. negatively impact the physical appearance of Hunts Point, and hence diminish the value of the land and property as well as contribute to the negative image of the peninsula.


Zoning:
Land Use and Existing Zoning
Land Use and Existing Zoning
PDF Document View a larger image
The peninsula primarily consists of manufacturing uses surrounding a 22 block residential area. For the most part,  M1-1, M1-2, and M2-1 districts surrounds the residential neighborhood, which is zoned R6. An M3-1 district covers the remainder of the peninsula. Residential uses are not permitted in any of the manufacturing zones.

R6
An R6 zoning district is currently mapped over 22 blocks at the heart of the Hunts Point peninsula This residential district is made up of a mix of row-houses and medium-density apartment buildings varying in height from two to eight stories. R6 is a height factor district with no height limits, and encourages small apartment buildings on smaller zoning lots and tower construction on larger zoning lots. The maximum FAR in R6 is 2.43 for residential buildings and 4.8 for community facilities.  The optional Quality Housing program permits an FAR of 2.2 on narrow streets and 3.0 on wide streets but limits building heights to 55 feet and 70 feet, respectively.  Off-street parking is required for a minimum of 70 percent of the dwelling units.

M1-1
The 44-block area immediately surrounding the residential core is zoned M1-1 for the most part.  These blocks contain a mix of uses, including warehouses, food distributors, auto repair shops, sanitation related businesses, construction-related businesses, and scattered non-conforming residences, as well as several vacant lots. Drake Park is also located within this rezoning area.  M1-1 districts generally permit light industrial, commercial and limited community facility uses.  Manufacturing and commercial uses have a maximum FAR of 1.0 and community facilities have a maximum FAR of 2.4.  There are no height limits, and building heights and setbacks are governed by the sky exposure plane. The commercial, manufacturing, and community facility parking requirements vary with use. 

M2-1
The northeast corner of the peninsula is zoned M2-1.  The 8-block area contains a mix of uses including single-story warehouses, wholesale distributors, industrial, auto and trucking repair and parking, and food manufacturers and distributors. The Bronx Charter School for the Arts is located on Longfellow Avenue just north of Garrison Avenue. The existing M2-1 district has a maximum commercial/manufacturing FAR of 2.0 and parking requirements vary by use.  M2-1 districts occupy the middle ground between light and heavy industrial areas. A range of manufacturing uses are permitted, but most commercial and community facilities are not allowed in the M2-1 zoning district.

M1-2
The half-block area east of the residential core is zoned M1-2. It includes single-story industrial buildings, contractor’s yard, and two non-conforming residences. The existing M1-2 district has a maximum commercial and manufacturing FAR of 2.0, and community facilities have a maximum FAR of 4.8. There are no height limits, and building heights and setbacks are governed by the sky exposure plane, and parking requirements vary by use.

M3-1
Much of the Hunts Point peninsula is zoned M3-1, which allows the heaviest industrial uses. This area contains a mix of uses including a water-pollution control plant, a fertilizer manufacturer, food distributors and manufacturers, warehouses, woodworking shops, restaurants, retail, auto repair shops, and truck and bus parking lots. M3-1 districts are for heavy industries that generate noise, traffic, or pollutants. Even in M3 districts, uses with potential nuisance effects are required to conform to minimum performance standards. Community facility uses are not permitted in M3 districts. The M3-1 district has a maximum commercial/manufacturing FAR of 2.0 and parking requirements vary by use. 

C1-4 Commercial Overlay
Local retail is located along Hunts Point Avenue and Lafayette Avenue, which are mapped with a C1-4 commercial overlay within the R6 residential district. Local retail and service uses are permitted in the C1-4 overlay. Commercial overlays are mapped within residential districts. In mixed residential/commercial buildings, commercial uses are limited to the ground floor. In C1-4 overlays mapped in R6-R10 districts, the maximum commercial FAR allowed is 2.0.

See PDF Document Zoning Comparison Chart.




Overview | Existing Context and Zoning | Proposed Actions | Public Review

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Brief explanations of terms in green italics can be viewed by clicking on the term. Words and phrases followed by an asterisk (*) are defined terms in the Zoning Resolution, primarily in Section 12-10. Consult the Zoning Resolution for the official and legally binding definitions of these words and phrases.
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