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Projects & Proposals > Brooklyn > Bedford-Stuyvesant South Printer Friendly Version
Bedford-Stuyvesant South Rezoning - Approved!
Existing Zoning
Introduction | Existing Context and Zoning | Proposed Zoning | Public Review

Neighborhood Character
Land Use Map
Land Use Map
PDF Document View Larger Image
Bedford-Stuyvesant is a predominantly residential neighborhood, well-known for its historic three – four story brownstones with small front yards and stoops, churches, and institutions.  With the completion of the Fulton Street elevated line and the Brooklyn Bridge in the late 1880s, Bedford-Stuyvesant developed as a middle class community for those commuting to jobs in Downtown Brooklyn and Manhattan.  Brownstones and larger brick and terracotta apartment buildings were constructed for the neighborhood’s many prosperous residents. 

After the completion of the A subway line below Fulton Street in the 1930s, many middle class African-Americans began to move to Bedford-Stuyvesant, creating one of New York's oldest middle class African American communities.  Following World War II, Bedford-Stuyvesant suffered a period of decline resulting in many vacant lots, underutilized sites, and a sizable amount of city-owned property.  In response, local community organizations emerged to help facilitate the rebuilding of Bedford-Stuyvesant into the vibrant community it once was. One of the best-known of these civic groups is the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation, the first community development corporation in the United States, located in the heart of Bedford-Stuyvesant on Fulton Street.  It was formed in 1967 with the help of Senators Robert F. Kennedy and Jacob K. Javits and has served as an example for other communities throughout the country.

In the 1960s and 1970s public redevelopment initiatives resulted in the construction of numerous public and publicly assisted housing developments mainly along Gates Avenue and along Fulton Street.  Most recently, in 1992, the City approved the Saratoga Square Urban Renewal Area at the community district’s eastern boundary with Ocean Hill-Brownsville.  This resulted in approximately 1,350 units through the rehabilitation of vacant city-owned buildings and the construction of new home-ownership housing.

In 1971, the Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the Stuyvesant Heights Historic District, located in the southern central section of Bedford-Stuyvesant.  The historic district encompasses 13 blocks of brownstones, apartment houses, and churches that are representative of the diverse architectural styles of late 19th and early 20th century New York City.

Existing Character
Brownstone Residential Districts: MacDonough Street between Patchen and Ralph Avenues
Brownstone Residential Districts: MacDonough Street between Patchen and Ralph Avenues
Stuyvesant Heights Historic District: MacDonough Street between Tompkins and Throop Avenues
Stuyvesant Heights Historic District: MacDonough Street between Tompkins and Throop Avenues


Today Bedford-Stuyvesant is experiencing renewed private reinvestment and is being developed with new stores and restaurants and private, market-rate housing.  However, the new construction, with curb cuts and large parking pads in the front yards and buildings set back from the street line, is out of character with the existing historic brownstone building form.  The proposed rezoning would protect the existing historic neighborhood scale and character while maintaining opportunities for new apartment building construction along streets that now are developed with mid-rise apartment buildings and allowing for residential growth with incentives for affordable housing along the Fulton Street transit and retail corridor. 

Present-day Bedford-Stuyvesant is characterized by a variety of residential building types including brownstones, mid-rise and high-rise apartment buildings.  The neighborhood’s primary commercial corridors, Fulton Street to the south and Broadway to the east, are supplemented by smaller-scale commercial activity on the north and south avenues.  Bedford-Stuyvesant is very well-served by public transportation, with the A and C trains running along Fulton Street, the J and Z trains along Broadway, and the G train along Lafayette Avenue, as well as several bus routes throughout the neighborhood.  There is also a Long Island Rail Road station located at Nostrand and Atlantic Avenues. 


New business on Fulton Street between Classon and Franklin Avenues
New business on Fulton Street between Classon and Franklin Avenues
Subway station at Franklin Avenue and Fulton Street
Subway station at Franklin Avenue and Fulton Street


Risley Dent Towers: Fulton Street between Marcus Garvey Boulevard and Lewis Avenue
Risley Dent Towers: Fulton Street between Marcus Garvey Boulevard and Lewis Avenue
Apartment Buildings on North-South Avenues: Renaissance Apartments on Nostrand Avenue between Hancock and Halsey Streets
Apartment Buildings on North-South Avenues: Renaissance Apartments on Nostrand Avenue between Hancock and Halsey Streets


NYCHA Public Housing: Brevoort Houses on Fulton Street between Patchen and Ralph Avenues
NYCHA Public Housing: Brevoort Houses on Fulton Street between Patchen and Ralph Avenues
North-South Avenues: Ralph Avenue between Madison Street and Putnam Avenues
North-South Avenues: Ralph Avenue between Madison Street and Putnam Avenues


Boys' High School: Marcy Avenue between Putnam Avenue and Madison Street
Boys' High School: Marcy Avenue between Putnam Avenue and Madison Street
Interfaith Medical Center: Albany Avenue between Herkimer Street and Atlantic Avenue
Interfaith Medical Center: Albany Avenue between Herkimer Street and Atlantic Avenue 


Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza: Fulton Street between New York and Brooklyn Avenues
Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza: Fulton Street between New York and Brooklyn Avenues
Underbuilt Commercial Buildings: Nostrand Avenue south of Fulton Street
Underbuilt Commercial Buildings: Nostrand Avenue south of Fulton Street


Vacant Lots: Monroe Street between Bedford and Nostrand Avenues
Vacant Lots: Monroe Street between Bedford and Nostrand Avenues


Out-of-Context Development: Herkimer Street between Albany and Kingston Avenues
Out-of-Context Development: Herkimer Street between Albany and Kingston Avenues
Out-of-Context Development: Madison Street between Stuyvesant Street and Malcolm X Boulevard
Out-of-Context Development: Madison Street between Stuyvesant Street and Malcolm X Boulevard



Existing Zoning
Current Zoning Map
Current Zoning Map
PDF Document View Larger Image
Currently, the rezoning area is predominately zoned R5 and R6 with C1-3, C1-4, and C2-3 commercial overlays generally on Fulton Street and some of the north/south avenues. There are some commercial and manufacturing districts along Fulton Street and Atlantic Avenue.  Most zoning designations within the rezoning area have been in place without change since the New York City Zoning Resolution was adopted in 1961.
R5
An R5 zoning district, which is currently mapped over approximately 30 percent (61 blocks) of the rezoning area, is located in the center of the rezoning area. It includes the Stuyvesant Heights Historic District, roughly bounded by Throop Avenue to the west, Monroe Street to the north, Ralph and Howard Avenues to the east, and Fulton, Chauncey, Bainbridge, and Decatur Streets to the south.  R5 is a residential zoning district which permits all housing types with a 40-foot height limit and a maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR)of 1.25.  R5 regulations allow an FAR of 1.65 on blocks that are predominantly built up to encourage infill construction, but any building utilizing infill zoningcannot exceed a height of 33 feet and must have an 18 foot front yard.  Community facilities, such as hospitals, schools, churches and medical offices are permitted with a maximum FAR of 2.0 with no height limit.  Off-street parking is required for a minimum of 85 percent of the dwelling units in standard R5 districts and a minimum of 66 percent of the dwelling units in R5 Infill.

R6
Approximately 68 percent (140 blocks) of the rezoning area is zoned R6.   R6 is a height factor district with no height limits and which permits tower construction on large lots.  The maximum FAR in R6 is 2.43 for residential buildings and 4.8 for community facilities.  The optional Quality Housing program permits an FAR of 2.2 on narrow streets and 3.0 on wide streets but limits building heights to 55 feet and 70 feet, respectively.  Off-street parking is required for a minimum of 70 percent of the dwelling units and a minimum of 50 percent of the dwelling units when the Quality Housing program is utilized.


C4-3
There are two areas zoned C4-3 in the southern half of Bedford-Stuyvesant.  One is to the west along Fulton Street, generally bounded by Bedford Avenue to the east, Halsey and Macon Streets to the north, Nostrand Avenue to the west, and Herkimer Street and Atlantic Avenue to the south.  The other was mapped in 2003 as proposed in an application by the Department of Housing Preservation and Development to foster retail development to the east along Atlantic Avenue between Suydam Place and Buffalo Avenue.  The C4-3 district regulations permit commercial buildings up to an FAR of 3.4, residential buildings with a maximum FAR of 2.43, and community facilities with a maximum FAR of 4.8.  Typical commercial uses in C4-3 districts are department stores, theaters, and other commercial offices that serve a larger region than just the local neighborhood. The C4-3 district has no height limits. 


M1-1
M1-1 zoning is mapped in five areas:
  • a block on Fulton Street between New York Avenue and Brooklyn Avenue which contains the Bedford-Stuyvesant Restoration Plaza, a retail and office center;
  • a block front along Nostrand Avenue between Gates Avenue and Monroe Street, which contains a residential building;
  • an area along Atlantic Avenue between Brooklyn and Nostrand Avenues, which contains a mixture of residential and industrial buildings and vacant land;
  • an area along Atlantic Avenue between Kane Place and Howard Avenue, which contains a mixture of industrial buildings and vacant land; and
  • an area along Atlantic Avenue between Nostrand and Classon Avenues, which contains auto-related uses, a post office and a few residential buildings. 

The M1-1 district permits light manufacturing and commercial uses up to 1.0 FAR and certain community facility uses up to an FAR of 2.4 with no height limit.


Commercial Overlays
There are commercial overlays permitting local commercial retail uses along the north/south avenues and along Fulton Street.  The C1 commercial overlays allow small-scale retail and service shops needed in residential neighborhoods and are generally along Franklin, Nostrand, Tompkins, Lewis, Howard, Ralph and Saratoga Avenues and Marcus Garvey and Malcolm X Boulevards.  The C2 overlays allow a slightly broader range of service uses, such as funeral homes and repair services, and are along Fulton Street and on Bedford Avenue.  C1 and C2 districts have a maximum commercial FAR of 1.0 when mapped in R5 districts, and a maximum commercial FAR of 2.0 when mapped in R6 districts.  C1-3 and C2-3 are typically mapped at a depth of 150 feet from the street line.

 

Introduction | Existing Context and Zoning | Proposed Zoning | Public Review


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Brief explanations of terms in green italics can be viewed by clicking on the term. Words and phrases followed by an asterisk (*) are defined terms in the Zoning Resolution, primarily in Section 12-10. Consult the Zoning Resolution for the official and legally binding definitions of these words and phrases.

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