Department of Cultural Affairs NYCulture City of New York Department of Cultural Affairs NYCulture City of New York










Percent for Art

   Colin Chase

Elegy for El-Hajj Malik Shabazz, Etched Glass Windows and Bronze Lettering, 1997

    See Also Breath and Mandala

Elegy for El-Hajj Malik Shabazz

Completion Date:

1997

Medium:

Etched Glass Windows and Bronze Lettering

Dimensions:

n/a

Location:

Audubon Ballroom

Address:

3940 Broadway, Manhattan

Architect:

Davis, Brody, Bond

Sponsor Agency:

Economic Development Corporation

Design Agency:

n/a

 
Elegy for El-Hajj Malik Shabazz is intended to function as an archway around the main entrance to the ballroom. Colin Chase has designed a series of etched glass windows which revolve around the X motif. There are six panels, four above the doors and one on either side of the doors. The artist explored the X as it is used as a symbol of inversion, as an hourglass, and as an unknown factor. The upper left and right panels were further combined with concentric circles of a target and a geometric subdivision that emphasizes the flow of time. The two central panels combine the X with an arch made of Kufic calligraphy that illustrates an Islamic prayer.

About the Artist...
Born in Newark, New Jersey, Colin Chase received his M.F.A. from the University of Michigan School of Art and Design and his B.F.A. from Cooper Union School of Art. His work has been included in one person and group exhibitions and several galleries including Jamaica Arts Center, Socrates Sculpture Park, The Studio Museum in Harlem, and the Neuberger Museum of Art. He is a former resident of the Institute for Contemporary Art, P.S. 1 Museum and Longwood Studios. Colin Chase is represented by the June Kelly Gallery in New York.

Artist Quote...
This commission was a wonderful opportunity for me to expand beyond the work that I create in the studio. Perhaps one of the greatest things about public art is that it gives artists the opportunity to expand into new mediums and work with people that they would not come into contact with in the gallery or the studio. -- Chase, 1997