News & Reports

Rockaways Economic Advancement Initiative: Workforce Development Program Request for Proposal
CEO, in collaboration with Small Business Services (SBS), NYCHA, and Citi Community Development, is launching a new initiative to connect Far Rockaway residents to high-quality, full-time employment by expanding place-based strategies that promote economic empowerment and mobility.
  
The selected vendor will contribute to positive employment outcomes in close coordination with the Far Rockaway Workforce1 Career Center and the Workforce1 system with a particular focus on residents of the six NYCHA developments in Far Rockaway. Furthermore, this investment in Far Rockaway is intended to be a pilot program that will inform best practices which can be replicated on a city-wide scale in other targeted communities with similar structural challenges as well as used to enhance the Workforce1 system’s approach to promoting access and opportunity for higher quality, full-time employment among all New Yorkers.

Questions are due to SBS by October 27th, a pre-proposal conference call is being held November 3rd, and final applications are due November 17th, 2014.

Click here for the RFP (in PDF)

DYCD, CEO, YMI, and Policy Studies Associates release new qualitative evaluation of the Cornerstone Mentoring Program
Launched in 2012 as a component of the NYC Young Men’s Initiative (YMI) in partnership with the NYC Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), the YMI Cornerstone Mentoring Program supports youth in grades five through nine during their transitions from elementary to middle school, and middle school to high school, by cultivating positive personal relationships and community involvement. Employing a group mentoring model with a ratio of one mentor to four youth, Cornerstone promotes participant growth using dialogue, role modeling, trips, as well as academic support. The program targets youth of color living in or near public housing who are at risk of dropping out of school. Participants in school year 2013-2014 were 59% Black and 35 % Latino. Cornerstone is administered by the Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) and operates in 25 DYCD Cornerstone Community Centers located in New York City Housing Authority facilities.

Key Findings

  • Mentoring program participants reported positive attitudes about their abilities to do well in school and beyond, compared to non-mentoring participants.
    Cornerstone participants were more likely to report feeling confident and capable of achieving success in school when supported by a mentor. Mentors reinforce the importance of school through regular check-ins and by addressing challenging school situations that disrupt academic success. Mentoring relationships provide support to help youth to stay in school and achieve academic goals.
  • Mentoring program participants reported high levels of trust and positive relationships with their mentors.
    Cornerstone promotes participant growth by connecting youth to caring mentors who help mentees to navigate race and class issues, and to build healthy relationships with their peers and adults. Mentees reported that they were able to talk to the mentors about their needs and concerns.
  • Mentoring program retention is higher compared to traditional afterschool programs (43% vs 35%).
    Engaging and enriching experiences help to bolster voluntary commitment to the program. Participant data suggests that mentoring participants were more connected to Cornerstone programming than their peers who were not enrolled in the mentoring program. On average, mentoring participants attended 397 hours of Cornerstone programming, compared to 174 hours of traditional afterschool programming attended by nonparticipants.

YMI Cornerstone Mentoring Report (in PDF)

New NYC Center for Economic Opportunity Report Shows Sector Strategy Making an Impact for Low-Wage Workers
The New York City Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO) is pleased to announce the release of an evaluation report from Westat on NYC Sector Focused Career Centers. This report shows that Sector Centers produced higher employment rates, greater job stability, and substantially higher wages compared with traditional career center participants. When compared with similar clients at Workforce 1 Career Centers, SFCC participants increased their earnings by an average of $5,800 over the course of a year.

CEO launched its first sector center in 2009 with the NYC Department of Small Business Services. An earlier report from Westat (2010) found positive impacts on employment and wages. The follow-up report released today (which covers a longer timeframe and includes new Sector Centers) continues the trend of positive findings.

Learn more about the positive impacts of Sector Centers in the full report (in PDF)

CEO, YMI, and Urban Institute Release New Qualitative Evaluation of The CUNY Fatherhood Academy
Launched in 2012 as a component of the NYC Young Men's Initiative and with funding from the Campaign for Black Male Achievement at the Open Society Foundations, the CUNY Fatherhood Academy(CFA) is a 16?week high school equivalency and college preparatory program serving New York City fathers aged 18 to 24 years. Participants are 62% Black and 38% Latino. The program uses a cohort-model and promotes responsible parenting, college readiness, and work among unemployed and underemployed fathers.

Key Findings

  • CFA Increased HSE Attainment by nearly 9% compared to the NYS average
    This is notable as CFA serves young fathers who are disconnected from education and employment, and who have high rates of criminal justice system involvement. In only 16 weeks, the program helps its participants earn high school equivalency (HSE) diplomas at rates above the NYS average (61.3% average pass rate among CFA participants, compared to 56.4% average among all 19- to 24-year-olds in New York State).
  • Community of Fathers was a Draw for Participants
    The program's focus on fatherhood was the primary draw for participants. The fathers value the parenting workshops and peer learning opportunities, and highlight the bond that develops between cohort members as key to program retention.
  • College Campus Location Impacted Participant Confidence and Motivation
    Stakeholders and participants credit CFA's location on the LaGuardia Community College campus as a source of motivation and self-confidence for the fathers. The campus setting helps CFA participants develop a sense of belonging and possibility, which the fathers report was missing in HSE programs they had experienced elsewhere.

Read CEO's Findings at a Glance (in PDF) or read Urban Institute's Full Report (in PDF).

The New York City Young Men's Initiative: Working to Improve Outcomes for Black and Latino Young MenMetis Associates' June 2014 report, "The New York City Young Men's Initiative: Working to Improve Outcomes for Black and Latino Young Men," presents findings from a cross-program evaluation of the Young Men's Initiative (YMI). It examines the influence of YMI on New York City agency programming and practices and identifies best practices in serving the needs of young men of color. In addition, it presents recommendations for strengthening YMI.

Highlights from the report include:

  • YMI has resulted in changes to City agency practice, bringing increased attention to major issues affecting young men of color.
  • YMI has enhanced networks within city government, between city agencies and service providers, and among service provider organizations. Agency staff report closer and more direct relationships with provider organizations, while providers report more receptive and collaborative relationships with city agencies.
  • Service provider organization staff and YMI program participants report improved education and employment outcomes, and a range of positive personal outcomes, including increased self-efficacy, improved interpersonal and conflict mediation skills, and a greater sense of personal and community responsibility.

NYC YMI Metis Evaluation Full Report (in PDF)
NYC YMI Metis Evaluation Findings at a Glance (in PDF)

FY13 data has been releasedCEO Releases Fiscal Year 2013 Performance Data on CEO and YMI.

Work Progress Program Application for Fiscal Year 2015 Now Open
CEO in partnership with the NYC Human Resources Administration is seeking qualified youth service providers to deliver the Work Progress Program (WPP) in fiscal year 2015 (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015). WPP is a subsidized wage program designed to complement existing youth services programs by providing participating low-income young adults with work experience. The original WPP pilot in spring 2012 selected 17 youth service providers across the five boroughs to serve over 300 participants. Since then, the program has expanded to serve over 600 participants through more than 20 service providers.
Apply (in PDF)

NYC Recovers Application for Fiscal Year 2015 Now OpenCEO in partnership with NYC Human Resources Administration is seeking qualified service providers to deliver NYC Recovers in fiscal year 2015 (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015). NYC Recovers is a subsidized wage program designed to provide Hurricane Sandy-affected residents with general employment opportunities and to place unemployed New Yorkers in recovery-related work within Sandy-affected communities. Since December 2012, NYC Recovers providers have served neighborhoods including those on the Rockaway Peninsula, Breezy Point, Gerritsen Beach, Brighton Beach, Broad Channel, Coney Island, Gravesend, Red Hook, St. George, Dongan Hills, New Dorp Beach, Tottenville, Throgs Neck, and Lower East Side.
Apply (in PDF)

Poverty and Evidence-Based Governance
The New York City Center for Economic Opportunity by the Nelson A. Rockefeller Institute of Government (RIG) analyzes CEO’s innovative processes and impact. The Institute describes CEO as “more than an anti-poverty agency. It is an ongoing experiment in governance, one that addresses a complex public problem through innovation, testing, and problem measurement.” The report goes on to consider CEO as a potential national model in making government policy smarter and more effective.

Poverty and Evidence-Based Governance - The New York City Center for Economic Opportunity - March 2014
(in PDF)

 

Shop Healthy NYC!Health Department and Center for Economic Opportunity Release Shop Healthy NYC Report Detailing Success of Program in Its First Year
The Health Department and the Center for Economic Opportunity released the results from the first year of the Shop Healthy NYC program showing the program has been successful in increasing both awareness and promotion of healthier foods in low income neighborhoods. Shop Healthy NYC is a voluntary program that works with communities to increase access to healthy foods. The results of the new report show that in its first year, Shop Healthy NYC increased promotion and access to healthier foods in 170 neighborhood stores, reached more than 80% of bodegas and supermarkets in the neighborhood, and increased the proportion of advertising for healthy foods and the stocking of healthier food options.

Read the press release
Read Shop Healthy NYC Evaluation report (in PDF)

 

Health Department and Center for Economic Opportunity to Release Report Showing Success of Shop Healthy NYC in Bringing Healthier Food to Low-Income
Neighborhoods

Download the media advisory (in PDF)

 

CEO and MDRC Release First Policy Brief on Paycheck Plus
In partnership with the social policy research firm MDRC, the New York City Human Resources Administration, the Department of Consumer Affairs, and the City University of New York, CEO is piloting a local demonstration project to simulate the expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to low-income single workers without dependent children, with the goal of increasing employment and earnings. The five-year pilot includes a rigorous evaluation led by MDRC to help inform policy discussions focused on poverty and work supports. An MDRC policy brief on this initiative, released today, describes major milestones reached in the first year of the Paycheck Plus demonstration – specifically the recruitment and enrollment of over 6,000 individuals into the study.

Paycheck Plus simulates an expanded EITC for single adults and tests its effects on employment, earnings, and other outcomes including child poverty. Low-income, single individuals were randomly assigned using a lottery-like process to either a “program” group, eligible for the new EITC-like wage subsidy, or a “control” group, eligible only for benefits under the current system. Paycheck Plus offers an expanded benefit to single adults of up to $2,000, which participants in the program group are eligible to receive for up to three years. The evaluation will follow individuals over a four-year period – tracking their employment, earnings, and other outcomes. Interim reports will be issued annually and the study will conclude in 2018 with the release of a final impact report.

The EITC is widely considered to be the most successful antipoverty program in the United States, and policy leaders have long advocated a more robust EITC for single workers. Paycheck Plus marks the first time government is putting the idea to the test.

Read more about Paycheck Plus in MDRC’s new policy brief.

 

Mayor Bill De Blasio and CEO Release Latest Citywide Poverty Measure
Mayor Bill de Blasio and the New York City Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO) announced that they have submitted to the City Council the Mayor's Annual Poverty Report. The 2005-2012 analysis, incorporating the latest data available, showed that as the economy emerged from recession in 2012, citywide poverty remained statistically unchanged from the previous year. Yet the poverty rate remains at troubling levels, especially when considering the number of New Yorkers living at or near the poverty line. This report highlights the importance of the social safety net in reducing poverty and identifies populations where the poverty rate is increasing at a somewhat faster pace than the rest of the city. The report also highlights some of the City's new antipoverty initiatives targeting problems cited in the report. Learn more

Some highlights from the report include:

  • While the city's economic and employment conditions improved since the 2008 recession, a large percentage of the city's population (45.6 percent) continued to live near the poverty line in 2012, compared to 30.7 percent in the official federal measure.
  • The poverty rate for working age adults (18-64 years of age) who were employed full-time, year-round, rose by 1.8 percentage points from 2008, reaching 8 percent in 2012.
  • Increases in poverty were particularly pronounced for Asian New Yorkers (a 6.6 percentage point increase, totaling 29 percent) and non-citizens (a 5.3 percentage point increase, totaling 29.9 percent).

"This report highlights the urgency of our policy and legislative agenda," said Mayor Bill de Blasio. "The data clearly shows that too many New Yorkers are struggling to get by, and the city must do more to address their needs. We are committed to helping level the playing field, while ensuring that New York continues to be a vibrant economic city for all."

 

SaveUSA Increases SavingsSaveUSA Increases Savings
Since 2011, SaveUSA, a tax-time savings incentive program, has provided the opportunity for low-income families in four cities to set aside part of their tax refund to save more in short-term, non-retirement savings. An MDRC report on this program, released today, demonstrates that low-income families can, in fact, save and that this program helps turn low-income non-savers into savers. MDRC is using a randomized control trial (RCT), the gold standard in evaluation, to determine the impacts of SaveUSA. Their report, “Encouraging Low- and Moderate-Income Tax Filers to Save: Implementation and Interim Impact Findings from the SaveUSA Evaluation,”shares impact findings on participants 18 months after they enrolled in the program in 2011.

MDRC found that after 18 months:

  • 79 percent of SaveUSA participants had non-retirement savings, eight percent more than regular tax filers.
  • SaveUSA participants had an average of $512 more in savings than regular tax filers.
  • SaveUSA participants also have more positive attitudes toward savings, with over 85% viewing savings as "very important."

The average household income of SaveUSA participants is under $18,000, and about 74 percent of account holders maintained their savings for about a year, receiving a 50 percent match, up to $500. MDRC did not find any impact on overall financial well-being 18 months after enrollment – SaveUSA participants were able to save without incurring more debt, but their financial picture was not improved by the program. MDRC will continue to study the effects of SaveUSA through 36- to 42-months after program enrollment. The final report, scheduled for late 2015, may shed light on possible impacts to participants’ overall financial health.

Read more about the effects SaveUSA has on participants in MDRC’s new report.


CEO Announces 2013 Data-Driven Provider Award Winners

CEO and the NYC Young Men’s Initiative (YMI) are pleased to announce the winners of the 2013 Data-Driven Provider Awards, recognizing providers of CEO and YMI programs that improve services for low-income New Yorkers through data-driven decision-making. The awards celebrate both robust data collection and high performance that met or exceeded program targets during the period of July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013. 

CEO and YMI are committed to using performance management and evaluation to ensure program participants receive the highest quality services and target outcomes are achieved. High performing community-based providers were invited to apply for an award if a program had a minimum of five providers. They were asked to assess how they use data to improve their program performance. City agency partners in collaboration with CEO reviewed all applications and selected the winners. This is the first annual award and we hope to expand the process in the future. CEO and YMI thank its partners and all providers who submitted applications.

Award Winners
Click on the links below for descriptions of the programs and to see more information about the providers. An (*) indicates a program expanded or created with support from the NYC Young Men’s Initiative.

Advocate, Intervene, Mentor (AIM) Program administered by the NYC Department of Probation*
Winner:Good Shepherd Services

Arches: Transformative Mentoring Program administered by the NYC Department of Probation*
Winner:Harlem Commonwealth Council

CUNY Accelerated Study in Associate Programs (ASAP) administered by the City University of New York
Winner: Bronx Community College ASAP

Financial Empowerment Centers administered by the NYC Department of Consumer Affairs’ Office of Financial Empowerment
Winner:Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation

Teen ACTION administered by the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development*
Winner: WHEDco

Young Adult Internship Program administered by the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development*
Winner: Catholic Charities Brooklyn and Queens

Young Adult Literacy Program administered by the NYC Department of Youth and Community Development*
Winner:BronxWorks

PhotoVoice
This summer 18 young people from the Brooklyn neighborhoods of Brownsville, Red Hook and surrounding communities were able to participate in PhotoVoice, a participatory photography program that teaches a documentary style of photography focused on issues related to their neighborhoods and self-exploration. The goals of this program were to empower participants, inform policy-makers and raise awareness about issues facing these young people.

PhotoVoice was funded by the Center for Economic Opportunity, and was launched in collaboration with four Brooklyn organizations – The Red Hook Community Justice Center, the Brownsville Community Justice Center (both projects of the Center for Court Innovation/Fund for the City of New York), the Brooklyn Arts Council and United Photo Industries.

Participatory photography gives youth the opportunity to engage visually in dialogues that may often exclude them. This project employs professional photographers to teach participants photography skills and engages students through a series of workshops, class critiques and field trips, and culminates in a final exhibit. Teaching Artists named Brenna McLaughlin and Janay McNeill facilitated these workshops and students crafted visual stories from their own unique perspectives.

View Photos from Brownsville (in PDF, 20.5MB)

View Photos from Red Hook (in PDF, 10.3MB)