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Discrimination against Muslims, Arabs, and South Asians in New York City Since 9/11

Discrimination against Muslims, Arabs, and South Asians in New York City Since 9/11

Asians in New York City Since 9/11 revealed that Muslims, Arabs, and South Asians believed that discrimination against them intensified following the attacks on the World Trade Center although the incidents went largely unreported.

Based on a survey conducted by the Commission in the Muslim, Arab, and South Asian communities, the report documented perceived incidents of discrimination in the areas covered by the City’s Human Rights Law – employment, housing, public accommodations, and bias-related harassment or violence. The survey was conducted in English, Arabic, Urdu, Hindi, Bengali, and Punjabi. The survey served to strengthen the Commission’s connections with these communities and has helped shape education, prevention, and enforcement efforts.

The survey revealed:

  • 69% of the respondents believed they were the victim of one or more incidents of discrimination or bias-related harassment;
  • 31% of the respondents believed that they did not experience discrimination following the attacks on the World Trade Center;
  • 79% indicated that their lives had been negatively affected by 9/11, regardless of whether or not they believed they had directly experienced any discrimination;
  • 17% of the respondents sought assistance from a government agency or community organization:
  • 83% of the respondents did not ask for help because they were afraid, believed that nothing would be done, did not know who to contact, or thought the incident did not warrant reporting.

Download this report (in PDF) online below, or call 311 or (212) NEW-YORK to receive it by mail.

English